Sessions at Open Source Bridge 2010 about Community

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Tuesday 1st June 2010

  • HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

    by Devin Chalmers

    My friend Alex is a lighting designer. He had an idea for a HyperCard stack he wanted to write, to help him coordinate lighting cues with a script; unfortunately, his PowerBook 140 is no more, so a written script he has to follow manually is the best he can do. To explore the state of citizen coding in 2010, I've implemented Alex's simple idea as many ways as I could, and we've still got a long way to go.

    So what happened to HyperCard? Photo editing, music production, page layout and publishing—all these dreams of 1980s computation have evolved and matured into world-class software, while HyperCard and its descendents have languished. We know that there are citizen coders, like Alex, who want to contribute. Why can't they? Does creation not scale?

    Computation becomes ever more mainstream, and today we sit at an inflection point: while social networks and devices encourage passive consumption over creativity, we have a unique challenge—and opportunity—to provide tools to help consciously perceive and manipulate our increasingly digital environment. HyperCard's time has nearly come: we are called to widen the reach of code beyond our geek niche.

    Citizen coding candidates touched on:
    - HTML + JavaScript
    - Shoes
    - Processing
    - Cocoa (1990s Apple kids programming environment)
    - HyperCard 2.4
    - Web HyperCard clones - various
    - Sk8
    - Quartz Composer
    - PowerPoint/Keynote
    - RealBasic
    - CouchApps
    - Squeak eToys
    - MacRuby
    - Novell Visual AppBuilder (1994)
    - Self
    - SuperCard?
    - Prototyping tools - var.
    - etc.

    (I'm submitting as a short-form talk, because that's as long as I can imagine my talk being, but this could be a fun long-form workshop as well—do a quick overview & discussion of the problem, split people up into groups, try and get everyone to bang out an idea in some framework they've never seen before, maybe even hash out some concrete ideas for HyperCard 2010.)

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Tuesday 1st June

  • The Second Step: HOWTO encourage open source work at for-profits

    by Sumana Harihareswara

    You might not even realize what obstacles are blocking your colleagues from efficiently collaborating with FLOSS projects. In this presentation, you'll learn how to take the next step in encouraging employees to contribute to FLOSS, with specific recommendations for fixing these issues.

    I'll introduce tools you can use, such as:

    • tuned employee performance criteria and appraisals
    • FLOSS-friendly project management strategies
    • sneaky-yet-sensible PR

    I'll mine my experience as lead project manager and personnel manager at Collabora for examples. And I want to hear your experience and suggestions, too -- for example, can FLOSS leaders help with tactics like sensible copyright assignment policies?

    At 3:45pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 1st June

  • Best Practices for Wiki Adoption

    by Ted Ernst and Steven Walling

    Two wiki enthusiasts —Steven and Ted —will share the best practices they've gleaned from 13 combined years using and teaching others about wiki and collaboration.

    At 4:45pm to 5:30pm, Tuesday 1st June

  • Geek Choir

    by Michael Brewer

    Over the years, many have observed the connection between mathematics and music. In this session, we’ll discuss various OSS tools for music notation and recording, as well as copyright issues, tips on arranging for various ensembles, and online archives of public domain music. But, mostly, we’ll sing, as we did at last year's OSB Unconference. :)

    At 4:45pm to 5:30pm, Tuesday 1st June

Wednesday 2nd June 2010

  • Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

    by Karsten Wade

    Red Hat is admired as a successful business that is an effective catalyst in communities, especially free/libre open source software (FLOSS). People look to learn from Red Hat in how to apply those practices to areas beyond software, such as education, business, and social activism.

    However, when we look at the way other people have enacted these practices, many have adopted a subset of Red Hat's methods, but leave out enough to affect their ability to benefit from a purely free/open stance.

    Many communities are successful in their domain without any idea of why their methods work. Is it pure luck or art? Or is it really a dose of humanism mixed with a long-practiced, and now well-studied, method of developing communities?

    This presentation explores the science behind "communities of practice", then covers a specific set of guidelines included in a new open, community-written guide, "The Open Source Way: Creating and nurturing communities of contributors".

    http://theopensourceway.org

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Wednesday 2nd June