Sessions at Open Source Bridge 2010 about Databases

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Tuesday 1st June 2010

  • Living Together In An Open Cloud World

    by Jonathan Bryce

    With millions of users signing on daily to access their favorite social media services – be it Twitter, Facebook or Digg – a developer’s worst fear is not having the backend support to house and access to such huge amounts of related data.

    Industry efforts to architect next-generation databases that can scale massively by pairing open source databases and content management technologies with cloud-computing are underway. The door is also opening to a whole new world of user benefits which will be made possible by access to data -- cross-cloud -- in non-proprietary databases and content management systems.

    The Apache Cassandra Project and Drizzle are open alternatives to traditional databases that offer new opportunities by using cloud computing to improve performance. Both are going to change the way we think about databases for the next few decades. And, from the content management side Drupal has become the ‘go-to’ open source software for the publication and management of website content.

    In this session, Jonathan Bryce, co-founder of The Rackspace Cloud, will discuss the recent movement – from both developer and vendor – for open cloud initiatives, while also addressing:

    • A basic overview of Cassandra, Drizzle and Drupal with case scenarios for each
    • The unique ways cloud providers are working with open database projects to maximize user experience
    • Traditional, distributed and non-relational databases
    • Enhancing site scale and performance by taking advantage of cloud-based file storage/CDN

    At 4:45pm to 5:30pm, Tuesday 1st June

Wednesday 2nd June 2010

  • Developing Replication Plugins for Drizzle

    by Padraig O'Sullivan

    The Drizzle Project is a fork of the MySQL 6.0 server, aimed at serving large cloud computing environments. One of the many goals of Drizzle is to enable a large plugin ecosystem by improving, simplifying, and modernizing the application programming interfaces between the kernel and the modules providing services for Drizzle.

    Drizzle’s replication system is entirely new and different from MySQL. It uses Google Protobuffer messaging in its application programming interface to communicate changes to the state of one server to another server. Plugins are easy to implement which enable a developer to entirely customize their replication system. This tutorial describes the APIs used in Drizzle’s replication system in depth and walks through the construction of several example plugins demonstrating the flexibility and power of the replication API.

    Topics covered include:

    • Overview of Google Protobuffers message API
    • Overview of the flow of messages through Drizzle’s replication system
    • Understanding the Transaction and Statement messages
    • Understanding the TransactionReplicator and TransactionApplier APIs
    • Overview of Drizzle’s Transaction Log module, which demonstrates an example TransactionApplier plugin
    • Walkthrough of the FilteredReplicator plugin
    • Walkthrough of the MemcachedApplier plugin

    At 10:00am to 11:45am, Wednesday 2nd June

  • Introduction to MongoDB

    by Mike Dirolf

    MongoDB is an open-source, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database. The goal of the MongoDB project is to bridge the functionality gap between a key/value store and a traditional RDBMS. This talk will introduce MongoDB and discuss some of the reasons why MongoDB might be the right fit for your project.

    We'll introduce MongoDB by explaining how it compares to traditional relational databases as well as some other non-relational systems. This will focus on the gains in scalability and flexiblity that make MongoDB an attractive option, as well as some examples of when MongoDB might not be the best fit. Following this introduction we will discuss some specific use cases for MongoDB. This will include examples of interacting with MongoDB from several different languages. We will review some of the advanced features of MongoDB and discuss how they can be put to good use.

    Questions and discussion will be encouraged throughout the presentation. We'll be able to dive deeper into any specific topics of interest to the audience.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Wednesday 2nd June

  • Cassandra: Strategies for Distributed Data Storage

    by Kelvin Kakugawa

    Cassandra is an open source, highly scalable distributed database that's rapidly gaining momentum in the NoSQL community. It brings together Dynamo's fully distributed design and Bigtable's ColumnFamily-based data model to provide a unique data storage solution that is suitable to a wide variety of use cases.

    Professor Eric Brewer's CAP theorem states that a distributed system design can offer at most two out of three desirable properties: Consistency, Availability, and Partition Tolerance. So, how do you provide consistency when your distributed system's primary requirements are availability and partition tolerance?

    In this talk we'll introduce eventual consistency and the four strategies that Cassandra uses to provide it, while still maintaining high availability:
    * Gossip
    * Read Repair
    * Hinted Hand-off
    * Anti-Entropy

    At 3:45pm to 4:30pm, Wednesday 2nd June

Thursday 3rd June 2010

  • Introduction to PostgreSQL

    by Josh Berkus and Christophe Pettus

    Interested in using PostgreSQL for you next project, or migrating to it? This tutorial will go over the basics of PostgreSQL administration and database application design, including coverage of the features available in version 9.0.

    Topics to be covered include:

    • Installation & packaging options
    • Basic performance configuration
    • Basic security configuration
    • Creating your first database
    • Backups, PITR and Replication
    • Common administrative tasks
    • Application design patterns
    • Managing database changes over time
    • Special features you might not know about
    • Tools you're likely to need

    In order to get the most out of this tutorial, all users should bring a laptop with PostgreSQL Version 8.4 and pgAdmin installed. For users unfamiliar with installing PostgreSQL, the One-Click installer is here: http://www.enterprisedb.com/prod...

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 3rd June

  • Relational vs. Non-Relational

    by Josh Berkus

    What kind of database do you need?

    Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.

    When do you want to use a SQL-relational database? When do you want to use a non-relational database? What are the types of non-relational databases available today? What kinds of things is each well-suited for?

    Database geek Josh Berkus will explain how to evaluate the database tasks you need to accomplish, and put you on the road to choosing the database product ... or more likely, products ... which are right for you.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 3rd June

    Coverage note

  • State of MariaDB

    by Michael Widenius

    The talk will describe in detail the new features in MariaDB 5.1 (stable), the new features in MariaDB 5.2 (beta / RC) and what's in the upcoming MariaDB 5.3 (alpha).

    The talk will also explains the challenges we have had to do this fork, and the various systems (like buildbot) that we used to build the binaries and how we are working with the MariaDB/MySQL community.

    This talk also includes information how we plan to continue developing MariaDB so that it still a drop in replacement of MySQL as times goes by.

    At 4:45pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 3rd June