Sessions at Online Information 2011 about Protocols and Social Media on Wednesday 30th November

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  • SOCIAL MEDIA PROTOCOLS, POLICIES AND LEGISLATION

    by marydee, Peter Griffiths, Graham Coult and John Sheridan

    TRACK 2 - SOCIAL MEDIA: EXPLOITING KNOWLEDGE IN NETWORKS
    SESSION: SOCIAL MEDIA PROTOCOLS, POLICIES AND LEGISLATION

    WHO OWNS YOUR HANDLE: IDENTITY ISSUES WITH SOCIAL MEDIA
    (Marydee Ojala, Editor, ONLINE Magazine, USA)

    WHO SAYS? LEGISLATION AND PROVENANCE ON THE WEB
    (John Sheridan, Head of Legislation Services, The National Archives, UK)

    Not all information is equal. Some information impacts the functioning of the economy or changes people's lives. When high value information, like legislation, statistics or statutory notices are published online, should it be held to a higher standard of authenticity and trust? How do we do this online? This presentation will explore the issues associated with provenance and the web and in particular work to include rich provenance information on legislation.gov.uk, using Linked Data standards. It will explain both the business drivers and benefits for rich provenance information and the technology solution adopted for legislation.gov.uk. In the UK the official version of legislation is published on legislation.gov.uk, with legal status. The National Archives has developed a new set of requirements, that every piece of legislation has with it a machine readable audit trail, that describes every step in its processing, from the document drafted in the department and approved by the Minister, through numerous conversions to XML and on to multiple renditions on the website. What is the relationship between the Word document, the XML and a web page or PDF created from that XML? Has the processing of the information changed it in some respect? What processes were performed to the document and can they be repeated? If there has been manual intervention as part of the publishing process can this be captured too? If you capture all this information, how can it be presented and used? The presentation will address these questions from the practical perspective of a large scale government website, legislation.gov.uk. It will concentrate on the use of semantic technologies to capture and convey provenance information and how these technologies are enabling new standards of "responsible publishing" to be attained.

    PRIVACY, DATA PROTECTION AND GOING GLOBAL
    (Graham Coult, Editor-in-Chief, ASLIB, UK)

    Privacy and Data Protection are terms which are used interchangeably, but actually there is a significant difference (as set out above). Both aspects need to be taken into account when creating an organizational policy both privacy and data protection. European Commissioner Viviane Reding is pushing for the introduction of a right to be forgotten reflecting the fact that in the internet world, we increasingly have to give away personal information in order to be able to access products and services both commercially and those which are free at the point of delivery. This raises questions about what it is legitimate for organizations to collect in terms of personal information from individuals, and how that information is handled and shared once it is collected. This paper (which will consist of two presentations, the second being, subject to approval, the UK Information Commissioner) will give an overview of the development of Privacy and Data Protection regulation, set out what exists of an international policy and agreement, and summarise the key players and influencers in the international sphere, examine the key issues and offer useful pointers on how to do business internationally while complying with expectations and requirements thus minimizing risk and protecting reputational capital.

    The key learning points of this paper are:

    1) The internet age and globalization are bringing attitudinal change among the populations of nations (at differing rates of change). Governments and companies need to keep track of, and respond effectively to, these changes.

    2)Individuals need to be aware of their rights, and also collective ensure that legislators, policy makers and company executives are aware of customers expectations with regard to privacy and data protection.

    3)We need global treaties and standards to support privacy and data protection, not just in the technical field but in the information management field.

    4)The disciplines of information management, records management and also information auditing have a strong contribution to make in delivering on privacy and data protection requirements, and reducing organizational risk.

    Moderator: Peter Griffiths, Writer & Consultant, UK

    At 4:00pm to 5:30pm, Wednesday 30th November