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Sessions at Pacific Northwest Software Symposium on Saturday 24th September

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  • AMQP: From Concept to Code Part 1

    by Mark Richards

    Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) is a new way of looking at messaging that is quickly gaining in popularity and use, particularly in the financial services industry. Unlike JMS, which defines a standard API across platforms, AMQP defines a standard wire-level protocol across languages and platforms, finally making true cross-platform messaging a reality. This is a two-part session. In this session (part 1) I will describe what AMQP is and what problems it solves, describe the basic architecture and how AMQP routes messages, and then, through live interactive coding, demonstrate how to build a simple producer and consumer using RabbitMQ to send and receive AMQP messages.

    Agenda:

    • introduction - what is amqp and what problem does it solve?
    • how amqp works - exchanges, binding, queues, and routing
    • amqp exchange types
    • amqp basic architecture and message structure
    • sending and receiving messages using rabbitmq

    Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of messaging; JMS experience or knowledge helpful but not necessary

    At 9:00am to 10:30am, Saturday 24th September

    In Salon A, Westin Bellevue

  • Automated testing tools and techniques for JavaScript

    by Venkat Subramaniam

    Programmers often complain that it is hard to automate unit and acceptance tests for JavaScript. Testability is a design issue and with some discipline and careful design we can realize good automated tests.

    In this presentation we'll learn how to automate the testing of JavaScript using both TDD and BDD tools.

    At 9:00am to 10:30am, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Chelan, Westin Bellevue

  • Cryptography on the JVM: Boot Camp

    by Matthew J McCullough

    Does your application transmit customer information? Are there fields of sensitive customer data stored in your DB? Can your application be used on insecure networks? If so, you need a working knowledge of encryption and how to leverage Open Source APIs and libraries to make securing your data as easy as possible. Cryptography is quickly becoming a developer's new frontier of responsibility in many data-centric applications.

    In today's data-sensitive and news-sensationalizing world, don't become the next headline by an inadvertent release of private customer or company data. Secure your persisted, transmitted and in-memory data and learn the terminology you'll need to navigate the ecosystem of symmetric and public/private key cryptography.

    At 9:00am to 10:30am, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Sammamish, Westin Bellevue

  • Functional Thinking

    by Neal Ford

    Learning the syntax of a new language is easy, but learning to think under a different paradigm is hard.

    This session helps you transition from a Java writing imperative programmer to a functional programmer, using Java, Clojure and Scala for examples. This session takes common topics from imperative languages and looks at alternative ways of solving those problems in functional languages. As a Java developer, you know how to achieve code-reuse via mechanisms like inheritance and polymorphism. Code reuse is possible in functional langauges as well, using high-order functions, composition, and multi-methods. I take a variety of common practices in OOP languages and show the corresponding mechanisms in functional languages. Expect your mind to be bent, but you'll leave with a much better understa

    At 9:00am to 10:30am, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Washington, Westin Bellevue

  • Motivation that Doesn't Misfire

    by Esther Derby

    Many managers ask me, “How can I motivate my team?” The zeroth step in boosting motivation is to stop doing things that demotivate people. But what is a manager to do after that? Prizes, treats, rewards, pep talks, and recognition events don’t cut it. Why? Many of the common attempts to improve motivation rely on an external source of motivation. That assumes that people need a carrot (or a stick) to keep them going. Research shows a contrary conclusion—that intrinsic motivation has more sustaining power.

    In this session, we’ll explore the key elements of intrinsic motivation in the workplace—autonomy, mastery, and purpose. We’ll examine how common management practices either support or work against intrinsic motivation. Then we’ll do an check-up to see where you can tap into autonomy, mastery, and purpose to boost motivation and creativity in your group.

    At 9:00am to 10:30am, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Coeur d'Alene, Westin Bellevue

  • AMQP: From Concept To Code Part 2

    by Mark Richards

    Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) is a new way of looking at messaging that is quickly gaining in popularity and use, particularly in the financial services industry. Unlike JMS, which defines a standard API across platforms, AMQP defines a standard wire-level protocol across languages and platforms, finally making true cross-platform messaging a reality. This is a two-part session. In this session (part 2) I will move beyond "hello amqp" and discuss more detailed aspects of amqp, including such topics as performance, rabbitmq administration, exchange and queue declaration considerations (that topic is really cool), load balancing, how to implement pub/sub in amqp, and how to manage undelivered messages and acknowledge messages. I will demonstrate and explain all of the examples and topics discussed in this session with hands-on live coding.

    Agenda:

    • amqp performance characteristics (how does it perform?)
    • rabbitmq admin console commands
    • pre-defining queues and exchanges
    • amqp routing considerations
    • load balancing
    • publish-and-subscribe model
    • managing undelivered messages
    • message achnowledgement

    Prerequisite: Some knowledge of the concepts of AMQP or Part 1 of this session.

    At 11:00am to 12:30pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Salon A, Westin Bellevue

  • Continuous Delivery Best Practices

    by Ken Sipe

    There is a new “movement” in software development circles called DevOps. It is about the automation of development best practices as well as the automation of the deployment pipeline. Answer this question, “How long does it take your organization or team to push 1 line code of change into production?” That’s what this session is all about.

    See what LinkedIn is doing… a company who is pushing production releases multiple times a day. Their approach may not be best for you, but we can learn from it. This session will look at all aspects of automating the delivery pipeline with a focus on “Continuous Delivery”, a term coined in the Agile Manifesto.

    At 11:00am to 12:30pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Washington, Westin Bellevue

  • Improving Customer Conversations

    by Esther Derby

    It’s not easy to build the right product. People sometimes don’t know exactly what they need, want things that won’t help, and don’t imagine what’s possible. Agile project capture requirements on cards that contain a statement of want and benefit and notes on how to confirm the need is met. The intention isn’t to fully document the requirement on the card, but to make a note and create a reminder for a conversation with the customer. Whether you are using agile methods or traditional requirements, valuable products start with understanding the customers context, their problems, what they want, and how they use a product. However, most people aren’t born with the ability to speak naturally in user stories or fully formed requirements statements. So we must learn how to ask the right questions, draw out pertinent information and understand the customer’s world in those conversations.

    In this session, you’ll learn about different types of questions, and when to use them to learn about how the customer currently uses a product, the problems they experience with the product, and problems that new features in the product might solve. Then, we’ll put that to work in practice interviews.

    At 11:00am to 12:30pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Coeur d'Alene, Westin Bellevue

  • Scala for the Intrigued

    by Venkat Subramaniam

    Scala is a statically typed, fully OO, hybrid functional language that provides highly expressive syntax on the JVM. It is great for pattern matching, concurrency, and simply writing concise code for everyday tasks. If you're a Java programmer intrigued by this language and are interested in exploring further, this section is for you.

    We will go through a rapid overview of the language, look at its key strengths and capabilities, and see how you can use this language for your day-to-day programming. This session will be coding intensive, so be ready for some serious Scala syntax and idioms.

    At 11:00am to 12:30pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Chelan, Westin Bellevue

  • Simpler Cryptography with 3 JVM Libraries

    by Matthew J McCullough

    Cryptography at first seems like a daunting topic. But after a basic intro and the leverage of the Java Cryptography Extension (JCE), it seems downright feasible to add encryption and decryption capabilities to your application.

    Developers weren't satisfied with just the JCE and its plug-in concepts though. Over the last few years, framework architects have made strides in either wrapping or re-writing the approachable JCE in more convenient APIs and fluent interfaces that make effective and accurate crypto down right simple.

    Explore three of these libraries -- Jasypt, BouncyCastle and KeyCzar -- and how they can be leveraged to make your next Java cryptography and data security effort a simple exercise and not a tribulation.

    Jasypt, BouncyCastle and KeyCzar are three open source frameworks that bring unique new crypto algorithms such as elliptic curve cryptography to the enterprise developer, remove repetitive ceremonious setup and tear down coding, and add high level adapters to the Spring and Hibernate frameworks.

    Prerequisite: Basic understanding of cryptography (hashing, symmetric, asymmetric)

    At 11:00am to 12:30pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Sammamish, Westin Bellevue

  • Git Going with Distributed Version Control

    by Matthew J McCullough

    Many development shops have made the leap from RCS, Perforce, ClearCase, PVCS, CVS, BitKeeper or SourceSafe to the modern Subversion (SVN) version control system. But why not take the next massive stride in productivity and get on board with Git, a distributed version control system (DVCS). Jump ahead of the masses staying on Subversion, and increase your team's productivity, debugging effectiveness, flexibility in cutting releases, and repository redundancy at $0 cost. Understand how distributed version control systems are game-changers and pick up the lingo that will become standard in the next few years.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Chelan, Westin Bellevue

  • Gradle: Bringing Engineering Back to Builds

    by Tim Berglund

    Gradle. Another build tool? Come on! But before you say that, take a look at the one you are already using.

    Whether your current tool is Make, Rake, Ant, or Maven, Gradle has a lot to offer. It leverages a strong object model like Maven, but a mutable, not predetermined one. Gradle relies on a directed acyclic graph (DAG) lifecycle like Maven, but one that can be customized. Gradle offers imperative build scripting when you need it (like Ant), but declarative build approaches by default (like Maven). In short, Gradle believes that conventions are great -- as long as they are headed in the same direction you need to go. When you need to customize something in your build, your build tool should facilitate that with a smile, not a slap in the face. And customizations should be in a low-ceremony language like Groovy. Is all this too much to ask?

    Gradle has received the attention of major open source efforts and has chalked up significant conversions by the Spring Integration, Hibernate, and Grails projects. What do these technology leaders see in this bold new build tool? They see not only a better way to build Java applications, but an extensive ecosystem of connecting to existing Ant and Maven build files while expanding the horizon of test, CI, and deployment automation in an easy manner. Join us for 90 minutes and let us take you on this same walk of discovery of the most innovative build tool you've ever seen'.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Sammamish, Westin Bellevue

  • The Busy Java Developer's Guide to Akka

    by Ted Neward

    With the rise of multi-core processors, and their growing ubiquity (on client machines, to say nothing of the server machines on which Java applications most frequently execute), the need to "program concurrently" has risen from "nice-to-have" to "mandatory" requirement, and unfortunately the traditional threading-and-locking model is just too complicated for most Java developers--even the brightest of the lot--to keep track of with any degree of reliability. As a result, numerous new solutions are emerging, each of them with their own strengths and weaknesses, leaving the Java developer in a bit of a quandary as to which to examine.

    In this presentation, we'll look at Akka, a framework/platform specifically aimed at building high-throughput, concurrency-friendly applications in either Java or Scala (or both), with a slew of additional add-on modules to handle issues like persistence, communication (pub-sub, REST, and more), and more. By the time we're done, you'll be able to start looking into using Akka on your own projects, and have a good feel for what your projects would look like when Akka-ized.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Washington, Westin Bellevue

  • Understanding Enterprise Architecture

    by Mark Richards

    Enterprise Architecture (EA) is one of the most misunderstood terms in our industry. Ask 10 people what EA is and you will get 10 different answers. To better understand what EA is and how it impacts your company (and you!) we will go back in time to maritime Britain in the late 1700's. Through exercises in designing a fleet of war ships and making decisions about what to do with the fleet you will understand the various approaches, directions, and implications of EA and how necessary EA is to achieve any company goal. So put your admirals hat on and climb aboard for a maritime adventure you won't forget!

    Agenda:

    • Introduction: What is Enterprise Architecture?
    • EA approaches (Designing the fleet)
    • EA direction (Deploying the fleet)
    • Five Common enterprise architecture pitfalls
    • Enterprise architecture references
    • Summary and QA

    Prerequisite: Not prone to sea sickness, willingness to have fun

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Salon A, Westin Bellevue

  • Working with Complex Adaptive (Human) Systems

    by Esther Derby

    The world abounds with complex theories and complex advice about complex adaptive systems. But most of them aren't very helpful when it comes to knowing what to do to make a system work better. In this interactive session, we'll explore three levers that you can use to influence patterns of behavior in complex adaptive systems...such as software development teams.

    In this session, we'll simulate a small product company and examine the structures, exchanges, and differences that influence how the company worked. Then we'll look for similar levers within our workplaces and develop ideas on how you can use lessons from complexity science to help your team work more effectively.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Coeur d'Alene, Westin Bellevue

  • Build Your Own Technology Radar

    by Neal Ford

    A Technology Radar is a tool that forces you to organize and think about near term future technology decisions, both for you and your company.

    ThoughtWorks' Technical Advisory Board creates a "technolgy radar" 3 or 4 times a year. It is a working document that helps the company as a whole make decisions about what technologies are interesting and where we should be spending our time. This is a useful exercise both for you and your company. This session describes the process we use and how to adapt it to both your company and, more importantly, yourself. For career risk mitigation, you must know what the next big thing is, or at least be able to narrow it to a reasonable list. Attendees will leave with tools that enhance your filtering mechanisms for new technology and help you (and your organization) develop a cogent strategy to make good choices.

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Coeur d'Alene, Westin Bellevue

  • Busy Java Developer's Guide to Android: Basics

    by Ted Neward

    Android is a new mobile development platform, based on the Java language and tool set, designed to allow developers to get up to speed writing mobile code on any of a number of handsets quickly. In this presentation, we'll go over the basic setup of the Android toolchain, how to deploy to a device, and basic constructs in the Android world.

    Attendees should be intermediate to advanced Java developers, as no time will be spent on Java basics, just the Android parts. Attendees are encouraged to bring laptops to the session (and your Android-based device, if you have one) to fill out code as we go, but the limited time frame means a focus on fast delivery of content and example code; have your fingers warmed up (and the SDK downloaded!) before you get here. (Latest Android SDK will also be on a USB key for attendees' use, in case attendees haven't had a chance to download & install.)

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Washington, Westin Bellevue

  • Git Workshop (Bring A Laptop)

    by Matthew J McCullough

    Git is a version control system you may have been hearing a bit about lately. But simply hearing more about it may not be enough to convince you of its value. Getting hands on experience is what really counts. In this workshop, you'll bring your Windows, Mac or Linux laptop and walk through downloading, installing, and using Git in a collaborative fashion.

    The workshop style of this class will allow you to observe and discover the value of this new version control tool first hand. You'll be cloning, creating, commiting, and pushing repositories by the conclusion of this session.

    Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of a version control system. Subversion knowledge is a plus, but not imperative.

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Chelan, Westin Bellevue

  • HTML 5 Overview

    by Brian Sletten

    People are confused about the status of HTML 5. Is it ready? Is it not? What is part of the spec and what isn't? We'll talk about the situation in the "HTML 5 and the Kitchen Sink" discussion, but as always, the proof is in the pudding. We will introduce the most exciting new features of HTML 5 and its related technologies and build examples that use them.

    We will work with real code covering:

    • The new input elements
    • Editable content
    • Canvas Element and its related 2D APIs for drawing and animation
    • Audio and Video elements and how to use fallbacks for codec coverage
    • Browser native drag and drop
    • Local storage
    • Web Workers
    • Websockets
    • The Geolocation API
    • Web DB (SQL in the browser!)

    This workshop will assume no special knowledge of HTML 5 and should be accessible to any web developers.

    Bring your laptops. This is a hands-on workshop.

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Lake Sammamish, Westin Bellevue

  • The Art of Problem Solving

    by Mark Richards

    I commonly think of those of us in the IT industry as problem solvers. Whether developer, designer, or architect, we are all presented with problems and work to find a way to solve them, usually through technology. In my opinion this is what makes this industry so much fun. Let's face it - we all love challenges. Sometimes, however, the problems we have to solve are hard - really hard. So how do you go about solving really hard problems? That's what this session is about - Heuristics, the art of problem solving. In this session you will learn how to approach problems and also learn some the common techniques for solving them effectively. So put on your thinking cap and get ready to solve some easy, fun, and hard problems.
    Agenda:

    • the checklist
    • you know what happens when you assume...
    • you gotta start somewhere
    • hey! keep it clean!
    • we should take the trail to the left...I think...
    • the world is flat (or is it?)
    • techniques summary

    Prerequisite: An open mind and a willingness to learn how to better approach and solve problems

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 24th September

    In Salon A, Westin Bellevue