PICNIC '11 schedule

Wednesday 14th September 2011

  • Living Networks, Urban Labs

    by Martijn Kriens, Euro Beinat, Nicola Villa and Peter Roelofsma

    Creating the cities of the future is not something that can be done from an ivory tower. Real life in cities is far more complex than planners and scientists can imagine from their offices. Therefore, we need strong involvement from real citizens that can co-create the solutions of the future together. Living Labs are experimentation environments all over Europe that take on this task. The European network of Living Labs (ENoLL, http://www.openlivinglabs.eu/abo...) unites all these Living Labs in Europe.

    At the PICNIC Festival, we’ll spend a full day exploring projects done by different Living Labs in Europe. The focus is on those that deal with city-based challenges like sustainability, energy efficiency, eHealth and eMobility. This session is organized by the Amsterdam Living Lab, together with ENoLL.

    Short presentations by:
    Bram Lievens: Homecare - Facilitating independent living projects in a cross-border setting.
    Miriam Reitenbach: Health - A living lab approach for creating the care of tomorrow.
    Rene Parker: RLABS - The social revolution
    Ben Kröse: An Interactive Dollhouse - Participatory design for ambient assisted living.
    Dave Carter: Smart Cities - Creating an inclusive and sustainable knowledge society (A local digital agenda for Manchester).
    Eline Westerhout: The Euro-South HUB project
    Alain Risbourg: Speeding the shift of society towards responsible managers.
    Esteve Almiral: Bringing open innovation to cities - the case of urban labs.

    At 10:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Redesigning the Government - Let's Do It Ourselves

    by Ben Schouten, Maurits Kreijveld, Peter Corbett ✈ and Ingrid Mulder

    In this creative workshop, we discuss a future scenario in which citizens create government. What if every citizen becomes a Member of Parliament and what if they distribute tasks such as initiating, budgeting, weighing, prioritizing and monitoring? How can smart infrastructure and social media facilitate these processes? What else is needed?

    The three speakers will share their visions of the future of DIY Government, followed by a discussion with the participants. This discussion will continue afterwards via online social media such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

    The output of this workshop and online discussions will be input for the future study, "Wisdom of the Crowd’," carried out by STT Future Studies.

    For more information, go to:
    www.wisdomofthecrowd.nl

    At 10:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • The Course of Creativity

    by Richard Taylor, Arthur Molella, Robbert Dijkgraaf and Mark Runco

    On Wednesday 14 September at PICNIC Festival 2011, we’ll start the morning with a keynote address (Robbert Dijkgraaf) on creativity, physics, and fine arts.

    The keynote will be followed by three lectures on the processes and mechanisms of creativity as formulated by three different disciplines. These lecturers include:

    ♥Arthur Molella: the socio-historic view
    ♥Mark Runco: the individual psychological view
    ♥Richard Taylor: the statistical coincidence view

    Speakers will share an overview of the key concepts in their domain (e.g., the evolution of innovation, genius and insight, and serendipity) and make an attempt to describe the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena.

    At 10:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Trust Design: The Internet of Things Panel Discussion

    by Katalin Gallyas, Tim Vermeulen, Lilet Breddels, Scott Burnham, usman haque and Richard Vijgen

    Premsela, the Netherlands Institute for Design and Fashion, and Volume Magazine will host a panel discussion during PICNIC Festival 2011 to explore connections between the Internet of things and the concept of trust.

    Premsela's Tim Vermeulen will talk with Trust Design project director Scott Burnham, Lilet Breddels of Volume Magazine, designer Usman Haque, and economic policy researcher Katalin Gallyas about how a challenging and complex issue such as trust can be supported or eroded in a world of networked objects and data-enabled devices. We often talk about “building” trust in the things we buy and the systems and spaces we use. This panel will ask: can we “program” or “access” trust more effectively in an Internet of Things?

    Premsela’s Trust Design www.trustdesign.nl research project was created to explore the relationship between trust and design, focusing on a wide range of design disciplines and applications. Throughout 2011, Trust Design is partnering with Volume www.volumeproject.org to publish four supplementary issues exploring trust and its connection to various design fields and issues. The latest Trust Design/Volume publication details the potential, possibilities, and pitfalls when issues of trust and the Internet of Things meet. This panel discussion will be an opportunity to discuss these issues with practitioners, theoreticians and policymakers. Each issue will add insight to the “rules of engagement” needed to regain trust as basic condition for a functioning society.

    At 10:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • The Best City Never Seen

    It seems that history is full of cities thought up, imagined, and dreamed of, that were eventually never realized. Admirable projects, magnificent places, utopian plans... human fantasy has built many more cities than what we see on a map.

    The Best City Never Seen is a 20-minute tour into the ruins of paleo-futuristic cities hoping to inspire a new way of thinking about cities and discovering the latent potential of the cities we now live in.

    At 10:15am to 10:35am, Wednesday 14th September

  • The Best City Never Seen

    by Lorenzo de Rita

    It seems that history is full of cities thought up, imagined, and dreamed of, that were eventually never realized. Admirable projects, magnificent places, utopian plans... human fantasy has built many more cities than what we see on a map.

    The Best City Never Seen is a 20-minute tour into the ruins of paleo-futuristic cities hoping to inspire a new way of thinking about cities and discovering the latent potential of the cities we now live in.

    At 10:15am to 10:35am, Wednesday 14th September

  • The Architecture of Developing Cities

    by Kunlé Adeyemi

    At 10:35am to 10:55am, Wednesday 14th September

  • New Aging Revolution

    by matthias hollwich

    e have to start a revolution! The way we age in America is inhumane and inadequate. We might live a good life after retirement, but the last three years are hell. There are 17,000 nursing homes in America, and 17,000 reasons to not move into any of them. The dignity of aging needs to be reinstated and we cannot do that by chasing eternal youth.

    New Aging explores a new way for society to deal with aging, by outlining how we can pioneer our own future selves, and how architecture and urbanism can be re-engineered to support new living typologies, service proximities, and social relevance and space. Become part of the New Aging revolution and join the conversation!

    At 11:00am to 11:20am, Wednesday 14th September

  • Urban Art & Urban Transformation

    by Maik ter Veer

    Exploring the limits of art and technology, the Robodock festival invites artists from Europe and North America to create fanciful worlds with state of the art fire shows, industrial installations, multi-media performances and more. Using urban environments as integral part of artistic expression and experimentation, the festival is considered one of Amsterdam's major catalysts of urban renewal. The former NDSM shipyard has been the setting for a number of the city's most flamboyant and visually stunning events such as the "Time, Rythm and Transformation" bonanza in 2007 and "the Fenix Orchestra" in 2010. Robodock's firebirds enchant and rejuvenate everywhere they perform.

    Robodock has chosen PICNIC as the venue from which to reveal their 2012 plans: a utopian communal art project to build the organisation's nomadic home of the future. All aspects of the project embody organic building processes, grassroots initiatives, agility and sustainability. Members of Robodock's large international network will contribute to the "Robo Cube," a talent incubator inspired by Burning Man, BimboTown and the Centre Pompidou amongst others. In this presentation, Maik ter Veer will describe Robodock's colourful history and its bright future with a series of short multimedia elements.

    At 11:20am to 11:40am, Wednesday 14th September

  • Creating a City You Can Call Your Own

    by David Barrie

    "Consultation", "participation", "co-design" and "community" are the popular mantras of responsible city development. But often what is sold or practiced in these terms is not the least bit collaborative or empowering, nor is it in the best interests of local citizens. When this kind of deception is revealed, it can lead to irresponsible behavior—and expressions of social injustice—like those we witnessed in the recent London riots.

    How do we design and deliver fair and equitable development in our cities? How do we foster innovation and create cities that enable citizens to be as productive, successful and happy as possible? How do we get landowners to see social change as part and parcel of their 'license to operate'?

    In this session, David Barrie will talk about a number of for-profit and non-profit projects he's been involved with that have been designed to create vibrant communities centered around shared values, well-being, and local identity. These projects look toward a 'New Deal for Cities', financed in inventively, using public space in imaginative ways and seeking to create new opportunities for people to call their city their own.

    At 11:40am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Another City Is Possible: Dreaming Networked Urbanism, and Doing It

    by Adam Greenfield

    So where do we find ourselves, after a solid decade of smart city rhetoric? What was promised to us, what has been delivered, what were the results, and what remains possible? Which cities have successfully capitalized on emergent technology, and which have made the wrong bets? Whose interests are reflected in smart city discourse, and whose have tended to be overlooked or pushed to the side?

    This session with Urbanscale founder and managing director Adam Greenfield aims to cleave hype from genuine potential, decode the claims currently being made for urban informatics, and lay out a set of criteria by which future proposals can be evaluated.

    At 1:15pm to 1:40pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Living Networks, Urban Labs

    by Nicola Villa, Euro Beinat, Peter Roelofsma and Martijn Kriens

    Creating the cities of the future is not something that can be done from an ivory tower. Real life in cities is far more complex than planners and scientists can imagine from their offices. Therefore, we need strong involvement from real citizens that can co-create the solutions of the future together. Living Labs are experimentation environments all over Europe that take on this task. The European network of Living Labs (ENoLL, http://www.openlivinglabs.eu/abo...) unites all these Living Labs in Europe.

    At the PICNIC Festival, we’ll spend a full day exploring projects done by different Living Labs in Europe. The focus is on those that deal with city-based challenges like sustainability, energy efficiency, eHealth and eMobility. This session is organized by the Amsterdam Living Lab, together with ENoLL.

    Short presentations by:
    Veli Pekka-Niitamo: Living Labbing 4 Business - China case
    Tangey Coenen: IBBT Museum App
    Elisabeth Nilsson: Co-designing Living Lab Fabriken -The Making of an Open Maker-Space.
    Jelle Monstrey: Crowdsourcing Digital Ideas.
    Liz Turner: Learning Living Data - Potential and Limitations for Visualization.
    Jonathan Gray: Open Knowledge Foundation.
    Rudy de Waele: App Circus.
    Marc de Colvenaer: Flemish Living Lab Platform.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Quantified Cities

    by Peter Bihr, Igor Schwarzmann and David Bausola

    There are two sources of data in a city: the physicality and the people. Both are generating huge amounts of data a great deal of which is being shared publicly. For example, buildings broadcast their energy efficiency much as a human records their sporting achievements. What we find at the intersection of these data sets, can be cause for concern or an opportunity to improve.

    Who and what is an occupant of a city of data? Are we facing the creation of data ghosts in the city of data?

    Using methodologies from the Quantified Self community and City Planning, we will produce a model of the blending of self and city in this special hands-on workshop.

    Three 10-minute introductions to the topics will be made by the team at the start of the session, after which we will dive into the workshop for an hour. We’ll be recording the process as a video - so come an be part of the exploration in the new frontier of urban living.

    Quantified Self application developers are strongly recommended to attend.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Quantified Cities

    by Igor Schwarzmann, Peter Bihr, Johannes Kleske and David Bausola

    There are two bodies of data in a city. The physicality and the people; both are generating huge amounts of data that is being shared publicly.

    Buildings broadcast their energy efficiency as much as a human records their sporting achievements.

    Where these data dimensions overlap produces a space that could be a cause for concern or an opportunity to sculpt.

    Who and what is an occupant of a city of data? Are we facing the creation of data ghosts in the city of data?

    Using methodologies from the Quantified Self community and City Planning to examine this phenomena - we shall be blending the self and city together in a special hands-on workshop to produce a working model of this situation.

    Three 10 minute introductions to the topics will be made by the team at the start of the session and then we dive into the workshop for an hour. We’ll be recording the process as a video - so come an be part of the exploration in the new frontier of urban living.

    Quantified Self application developers are strongly recommended to attend.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • The Coure of Creativity: Make the Mechanism

    by Marise Schot, Mike Lee and Miriam Reitenbach

    What does it mean to be creative? And what does it mean to you?

    This session explores various visualization techniques as a medium to support the design process towards the understanding of the phenomenon of creativity. We will provide a diverse set of materials (toy bricks. lego, scrap material, etc.) as a tool to inspire participants and visualize ideas. By building visual associations and using the hand-mind connection, participants can forego the dominant force of words. Visual brainstorming stimulates creativity, externalizes thoughts and helps participants to express insights and ideas actively.

    Facilitated by Waag Society's Miriam Reitenbach & Marise Schot.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Urban Screens in the Electric City

    by Maia Garau, Matt Cottam, Beeker Northam and Chris Heathcote

    Outdoor and public screens are the cheap, new media being installed throughout cities by governments, businesses and advertisers. Could these change the way we live in and use the city? Can the needs and rights of citizens be incorporated into commercial media networks? Will we create new ways of interacting with infrastructure and architecture?

    We'll look at current best practice, some of the problems and benefits, and design together the screens and media surfaces that we want to see in our cities.

    At 1:30pm to 3:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Beyond Smart Cities

    by Tim Campbell

    Popular literature and many high-tech corporations tout “intelligent” and “smart” cities, referring to the wizardry of pervasive electronic connections. Yet wired cities are only the trappings of smartness; they sometimes amount merely to dressing a pauper in prince’s clothing. To achieve the real promise of smart cities – that is to create the conditions of continuous learning and innovation that have led cities like Seattle, Ahmedabad and Curitiba to keep pace with global challenges – we need to understand what is beneath the surface of smart and connected places. “Clouds of trust” (civic connections of confidence) turn out to be an important key. So does “tissue of remembering” (institutional memory). Both are forms of social capital that cities build up as they go about learning from one another, as they are doing by the thousands around the globe.

    At 1:40pm to 2:00pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Playing the City: Designing Slow Experiences for Urban Environments

    by Toby Barnes

    http://vimeo.com/31076862
    The possibility that beneath the surface of the normal exists the unfamiliar, means that what is considered normal must, by definition, include the abnormal.

    Chromaroma is a game that provides players new ways to experience city life, from commuting to hunting ghosts, from way finding to serendipity, and from being Jason Bourne to making a game that takes a year to play.

    We are designing interfaces that allow players to SEE their journeys, and making a game "that shouldn't really exist." Come check it out!

    At 2:00pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 14th September

    Coverage video

  • The Digital Creative City

    by Ricardo Álvarez

    At 2:00pm to 2:20pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Future Cities

    by Carlo Ratti

    The real-time city is now real! The increasing deployment of sensors and hand-held electronics in recent years is allowing a new approach to the study of the built environment. The way we describe and understand cities is being radically transformed - as are the tools we use to design them and impact on their physical structure.

    At 2:20pm to 2:40pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Rioting, Ballet, and Elvis's Hips

    by Ben Hammersley

    "Smart cities, ubicomp, and other technological wonders are all very well, but cities are made of people, and people are weird. Ben Hammersley will look at how cultures and society change, how technology can outpace good manners, and how designers and makers can change the world without getting into a fight, punching an artist, or taking off their ballet shoes. Featuring music, silly jokes, some quantum physics, and no slides whatsoever!

    At 2:40pm to 3:05pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Beyond Badges: A Gamification Design Workshop

    by micah hrehovcsik, Lies van Roessel and Annerieke Heuvelink

    Gamification has been described as the use of game thinking to engage audiences and to solve problems. EGG is a cooperative initiative between TFI, TNO and the HKU aimed at stimulating the games industry through knowledge and consultancy. Using frameworks to educate people about gamification and its possibilities, EGG will present its perspectives on gamification design. During this two-part session, a senior consultant will tell us about gamification design and lead a brainstorm session. The takeaway from this session is a broader perspective on gamification and its design.

    At 3:45pm to 5:15pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Future Cities: Designing for Ownership

    by Michiel de Lange, Carl Lens, Tracy Metz, martijn de waal and Cathy Brickwood

    This is a panel is about "ownership" as alternative design approach to the so-called Smart City paradigm. The session is hosted by Virtueel Platform and The Mobile City, and moderated by Tracy Metz, renowned journalist of NRC. A copy of the new study "Ownership in de hybride stad" (in Dutch) will be available for all participants.

    The “Smart City” paradigm in urban design promises a future in which our cities will be more efficient and sustainable through the use of digital media technologies. That's great, but are cities really all about calculation and efficiency?

    In this session we present “ownership” as an alternative design approach. How can we employ new technologies to keep our ever more complex cities livable and lively for humans? How can we design cities where citizens feel they belong, and feel the city belongs to them as well... where they have the power to act on communally shared issues? In short: how can digital media aid in strengthening a sense of “ownership” among urbanites?

    This session is the official launch of the study “Ownership in the Hybrid City”, conducted by Virtueel Platform and The Mobile City. A copy of the study will be available for all participants.

    This session features talks by Virtueel Platform, Michiel de Lange & Martijn de Waal (TheMobileCity.nl) and Carl Lens (verbeterdebuurt.nl). Tracy Metz of NRC Handelsblad is moderator.

    "Future Cities: Designing for Ownership" is the official launch of "Ownership in de hybride stad", a study conducted by Virtueel Platform and The Mobile City as part of a bigger project on the Hybrid City / Media en de Stad.

    At 3:45pm to 5:15pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • How Advertising Will Heal the World and Your Business

    by mark woerde

    Make this world a better place, win a Nobel Prize and sell more! In just 25 minutes, Mark Woerde unveils new insights and practical knowledge that will make brands grow and bring about a huge positive impact on our world.

    From his recent research involving 16 countries and 24,000 respondents it's clear: the time has come for a radical paradigm shift in branding because of consumers' universal search for meaning. Where in the past branding seemed primarily focused on fulfilling hedonistic individual needs, it's now clear people are waiting for brands that help them help others.

    Just imagine what would happen if even a fraction of the US $450 billion spent annually on advertising went into so-called pro-social marketing.

    At 3:45pm to 4:10pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Living Networks, Urban Labs

    by Martijn Kriens, Euro Beinat, Nicola Villa and Peter Roelofsma

    Creating the cities of the future is not something that can be done from an ivory tower. Real life in cities is far more complex than planners and scientists can imagine from their offices. Therefore, we need strong involvement from real citizens that can co-create the solutions of the future together. Living Labs are experimentation environments all over Europe that take on this task. The European network of Living Labs (ENoLL, http://www.openlivinglabs.eu/abo...) unites all these Living Labs in Europe.

    At the PICNIC Festival, we’ll spend a full day exploring projects done by different Living Labs in Europe. The focus is on those that deal with city-based challenges like sustainability, energy efficiency, eHealth and eMobility. This session is organized by the Amsterdam Living Lab, together with ENoLL.

    Short presentations by:
    Wendy E. Brawer: Sharing Directions to a Sustainable Future with Green Maps.
    Sandra Marin Herbert: MALAGALAB: Developing Smart & Sustainable Urban Areas for the Future.
    Janne Orava: Conference Hotel of Tomorrow - Developing and Implementing Meeting Architecture Service using Living Lab Methods.
    Pieter Ballon: Urban Labs - The Way Forward.
    Markku Markkula: EU2020 Calls for Transformation.
    Ilari Lindy: The World Bank ICT Knowledge Platform for Accountability of Public Service Delivery.
    Alvaro Oliveira: Short Closing by Alvaro.

    At 3:45pm to 5:15pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Redesigning the European City: Amsterdam, Paris...

    by Andrew Bullen

    Redesigning the European City: Amsterdam, Paris ...
    International teams of young designers present their winning
    solutions and we look towards the next European Street Design Challenge in 2012.

    The first European Street Design Challenge at PICNIC in September 2010 succeeded in accomplishing its primary goals: to unite international creatives, designers, festivals and cities in creating a strong and shared vision of an innovative and feasible urban future. The event produced not only inspirational urban design solutions, but also a significant contribution to the debate on the potential of creative European collaboration across diverse cultures.

    The second edition of the Challenge at Futur-en-Seine in June 2011 built on this success. The theme of “unity within diversity” was once again explored, not only on a European level, but within the Paris Region itself. In Paris, as in other major cities, urban designers, architects, politicians, creatives and citizens increasingly face the challenge of creating a sense of connectedness and shared identity between the new, expanding suburbs and the old, historic city centre. For Futur-en-Seine, a “border” area linking the city of Paris and the "@93 banlieue” was defined as the target area for redevelopment by young, international designer teams. The challenge was indeed ambitious – to design a “gateway” or “bridge” between the suburbs to the city centre, which is natural, aesthetically balanced and inclusive.

    The Challenge event at PICNIC 2011 will present the winning projects from Paris 2011 within both a local urban and European design context. Details of the next challenge will be announced, and international teams will be invited to participate in Futur-en-Seine 2012.

    At 3:45pm to 5:15pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Bridging the Digital and Educational Divide in Developing Economies

    by eliyahu starr

    Five billion people in the world today have no access to the Internet. A large part of these citizens live in developing countries and marginalized communities. What are the models that have worked to bridge this type of digital iliteracy gap? What are the costs of large scale programs? What is the role of government, citizens and NGO's?

    Jorge Camil Starr will tell us about the model he has built in Mexico which has benefitted more than 150,000 people in less than 2 years. He will review other models like OLPC and tell us why they are not viable for the developing world. His platform is based entirely on Linux and community building, and it is low cost and exportable to wherever there is a need to for digital access. In addition, he will touch upon the economic benefits of reducing the digital divide.

    At 4:10pm to 4:25pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Art to the People!

    by Victor H Celaya and Ricardo Celaya

    This session will explore the power of art as a communication tool, an instrument to integrate cities and a vehicle for change. ARTO founders will also discuss how disruption plays an essential role in making this happen. They will share their experiences producing innovative art projects with the sole intent of promoting social inclusiveness and empowering people.

    At 4:25pm to 4:40pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • Games in Informal Settlements

    by EmerBeamer

    How can a mobile game contribute to improving life in informal settlements around the world?

    Today, one billion people live in informal settlements and their numbers are growing as migration to cities is increasing. GetH20 Mtaani is a game based on the complexity of life including dealing with the scarcity of water, with crime and the escalation of conflict as well as community development. Co-designed with young people from Nairobi, it is spreading across Kenya and Uganda through mobile game websites, Nokia’s Ovi Store and special youth gatherings.

    Emer will share insights about engaging some of the poorest people in a city with a game about their issues, including the design process and the potential for translating into real world action.

    At 4:40pm to 4:55pm, Wednesday 14th September

  • The Emergence of Brand Philanthropy

    by Laurence Parkes

    The increased control that consumers have over media means we are moving into an era of brand philanthropy. Like the philanthropists of the Industrial Revolution, brands are realizing that to create wealth they must provide services that improve the quality of life of urban dwellers.

    At 4:55pm to 5:10pm, Wednesday 14th September