Sessions at PyGotham on Friday 16th September

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  • 1 day Intro to Python, 1 day Intro to Django: Day 1

    by gloriajw

    A two day course taught by four people. The first day will be comprised of Python basics and short exercises. The second day will be a walkthrough of a functional Django site. All instructors and TAs have teaching experience.

    There is no additional cost, but these classes require pre-registration. Limited seating available. Send email to pygotham at thepeoplesconference dot com to register.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 3, Executive Conference Center

  • MongoDB Schema Design

    by Kyle Banker

    One of the challenges that comes with moving to MongoDB is figuring how to best model your data. While most developers have internalized the rules of thumb for designing schemas for RDBMSs, these rules don't always apply to MongoDB. The simple fact that documents can represent rich, schema-free data structures means that we have a lot of viable alternatives to the standard, normalized, relational model. Not only that, MongoDB has several unique features, such as atomic updates and indexed array keys, that greatly influence the kinds of schemas that make sense. Understandably, this begets good questions: Are foreign keys permissible, or is it better to represent one-to-many relations withing a single document? Are join tables necessary, or is there another technique for building out many-to-many relationships? What level of denormalization is appropriate? How do my data modeling decisions affect the efficiency of updates and queries? In this session, we'll answer these questions and more, provide a number of data modeling rules of thumb, and discuss the tradeoffs of various data modeling strategies.

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Planning Your Load Testing: What You Need to Know

    by Mirkeya Capellan

    Planning your load testing can be tricky. Depending on the test requirements, the test may be very valuable or just a waste of time. Why? Well, if you don’t know exactly what to test and which specific areas of the application to target, the results may not be helpful at all. This presentation will cover best practices and tips for planning a load/performance test at your organization. Some of the topics include gathering test requirements, test data collection, scripting, testing tools, test environment, test workload and execution, analyzing test results, and identifying bottlenecks. Learn how to plan your next load/performance test to avoid any pitfalls and maximize the value of testing.

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

  • STEM coming to a stop near you

    by Dora Maria Abreu

    STEM defined. What is STEM and what you can do to increase the STEM knowledge every where!

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Evolution without Migrations: Agile Data with MongoDB and Django

    by Dan Crosta

    Love Django, but hate schema migrations? Need to scale to more than a few gigabytes of data? Tired of flattening your data, only to have your code rebuild the hierarchy? This talk will show you how you can leave JOINs behind and embrace MongoDB for your next Django project. MongoDB's hierarchical document-oriented design makes it a natural fit for web development, and when coupled with Python's easy-going nature, using MongoDB with Django is a breeze. In this talk, learn about MongoDB, the most popular NoSQL database; MongoEngine and friends, the Djangonic MongoDB adapter; and watch as we build a highly-scalable online game before your very eyes.

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • HTML5 and the DOM

    by Mike Taylor

    In this talk we'll cover some of the DOM interfaces that HTML5 has standardized, and some of the new APIs that make working with the DOM suck a little bit less.

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

  • SQLAlchemy, an Architectural Retrospective

    by Mike Bayer

    In this talk I'll walk through some highlights of SQLAlchemy internal design and methodology, based on the upcoming chapter for the "Architecture of Open Source Applications" book. We'll have a little bit of SQLAlchemy philosophy, an overview of the Core, and then a 500-ft view of how the ORM goes about things, with plenty of cool looking diagrams.

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • The Care and Feeding of an Open Source Community

    by Meghan Gill

    A case study on how we built the community around MongoDB, with some lessons learned for anyone building community around open source

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

  • What's the Hubbub on Compliance? Day 1

    by Scott Walters

    "What's the Hubbub on Compliance?"

    You've probably heard about, or been exposed to, many different compliance regulations these days such as SAS70, SSAE16, PCI, HIPPAA, SOX, etc. What do they all mean and why have they been put into place? I will answer those questions and also cover some lessons learned during implementation and on-going support of environments that need to be compliant. I will also go over open source tools that can effective to help met compliance regulations.

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 4, Executive Conference Center

  • Art, Cultural Concern, and Computer Code

    by Annina Rüst

    I will talk about software as art and software and politics using some of my own art+tech projects. This will be followed by an audience participation segment.

    At 11:00am to 11:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Behind the Scenes at Fiesta

    by Mike Dirolf

    This talk will look inside the technology and architecture used at Fiesta (https://fiesta.cc), with a focus on the deployment of Python web apps, processing email, and using MongoDB in practice. The goal is to provide generic insights about the tools we've chosen, rather than information specific to our business.

    At 11:00am to 11:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Moving Fast (with Django)

    by James Socol

    How fast can you deploy a fix to your users? How confident are you with your deploys? We'll talk about setting up a deployment pipeline to get code in front of your users faster and do it confidently. Then we'll talk about the hurdles--cultural, technical, and Django-specific--and how to clear them.

    At 11:00am to 11:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

  • Unifying the Open Source Movement - Behavioral Economics and The First MMRL Game

    by Edward T Hall

    Humanity is going head first into a wall of disaster, and pressing the accelerator. At the same time, we have the free tools that completely change the game. Nothing is happening though! Or it,s too slow. I will explain the emergence of a project that can help humanity harness the power of our inventive capacity, and will attempt to describe what I believe is the missing ingredient to catalyze the open source era.... it leads us to a very serious discussion of laser tag. I am sure you all will enjoy it at the very least :)

    At 11:00am to 11:45am, Friday 16th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

  • MongoDB Replication in Detail

    by Tony Hannan

    MongoDB supports asynchronous replication of data between servers for failover and redundancy. In this session, we'll introduce the different modes the replication, including master-slave and replica sets, and we'll describe how to achieve better durability by adjusting the write concern. We'll also discuss backups and provide some tips on scaling with replication alone.

    At 1:15pm to 2:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

  • Tmux + IPython = Awesome

    by Alexander Gaudio

    This is a two part class aimed at expanding a developer's toolset with both tmux and IPython. In the first half, we will learn about tmux. I will first explain its client-server model and general architecture, compare it to GNU screen, and show some use cases. Then, we will start using it, create a customized profile, and solve a simple distributed computing problem with tmux. In the second half of this class, we will start using IPython. I will first explain what it is and review different use cases. Then, we will start using some basic commands, customize our profile and aliases, integrate python and shell scripting into the same code, and, time permitting, see some of the interactive scientific computing and interactive distributed computing possibilities.

    If you have one, bring a laptop with tmux and IPython already installed.

    At 1:15pm to 2:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Benchmarking RAID arrays & Making Your Database Scream

    by Brennan McNenly

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 4, Executive Conference Center

  • Python is from Pluto, Functional Languages are from Venus: Integrating Python with Erlang, Scala and F#

    by Andrea Wright

    We won't just look at how to use projects that bridge Python and functional languages, we'll walk through the lower-level code that allows the inter-language communication to happen.

    We'll explore different approaches to language interoperability ranging from accessing libraries through universal protocols to embedding foreign syntax in a host source file.

    We'll also discuss techniques for ensuring that your polyglot applications won't read like bad translations and behave in unexpected ways.

    At 2:15pm to 3:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

  • Rapid and Scalable Development with MongoDB, PyMongo, and Ming

    by Rick Copeland

    This intermediate-level talk will teach you techniques using the popular NoSQL database MongoDB and the Python library Ming to write maintainable, high-performance, and scalable applications. We will cover everything you need to become an effective Ming/MongoDB developer from basic PyMongo queries to high-level object-document mapping setups in Ming.

    At 2:15pm to 3:00pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

  • Boosting the numbers: Python for Women and Doing Distributed Organizing of Workshops

    by Lukas Blakk

    The PyStar program is a workshop designed to teach all women (including trans women) and their friends who are looking to learn how to program in a friendly non-alpha-geek environment. The material on the http://pystar.org/ site was originally developed by the Boston Python Workshop which was held March 4/5, 2011. Currently PyStar events use a mix of badges from the PyStar site and their own curriculum. As this project continues hopefully this site will be a hub of learning materials geared at all levels of Python learners, with a focus on teaching people in a safe and supportive manner.

    At 3:00pm to 3:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Monitoring MongoDB

    by Dan Pasette

    Mongo Monitoring System

    At 3:00pm to 3:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

  • OpenBlock: Hyperlocal Django

    by Paul Winkler

    OpenBlock (http://openblockproject.org) is an open-source (GPL) hyperlocal news website / service built on Django. This talk would be an overview of the project: what it does, how it works, its history and future. And a brief live demo.

    At 3:15pm to 4:00pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

  • You Can’t Scan for The Stupid Day 1

    by Charles Henderson

    Every developer wants to develop secure code and automated application security tools are an appealing choice for developers who might be looking for a silver bullet. However, manual security testing isn't going anywhere until the HAL application scanner comes online. This developer centric presentation will use often humorous, real-world examples to illustrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of automated solutions and manual techniques.

    Automated tools have some strengths, namely low incremental cost, detecting simple vulnerabilities, and performing highly repetitive tasks.

    However, automated solutions are far from perfect. There are entire classes of vulnerabilities that are theoretically impossible for automated software to detect. Examples include complex information leakage, race conditions, logic flaws, design flaws, and multistage process attacks.

    Beyond that, there are many vulnerabilities that are too complicated or obscure to practically detect with an automated tool.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 4, Executive Conference Center

  • Intro to Data Visualization

    by Julie Steele

    Have lots of data? Want to turn it into pictures to help you better understand it or explain it to others? This session will address best practices for encoding information through design, and will look at a few ways of doing this in Python.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Markov in Python

    by Keith Avery

    A talk about the uses and implementations of Markov models in Python, with an emphasis on Markov chains. A Markov chain program for generating a language glossary from corpora will be discussed as an example application.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Sharding and Scaling with MongoDB

    by Eliot Horowitz

    This session is a deep dive into the implementation of sharding within MongoDB. We'll review the MongoDB's sharding architecture, which blends ideas from RDBMSes, key/value stores, and large distributed systems like BigTable. We'll then take a look under the hood to show how queries work across a sharded set up, and how data is balanced and migrated.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

  • Singularity 101

    by Laure Parsons

    As a filmmaker, I am not an expert on the Singularity, but I have met many of the leading thinkers on the subject and will be happy to share what I've learned so far. You can go to http://accelerationthemovie.com for more information about me and my project. This session will be interactive. Your questions and input will be welcome.

    At 4:15pm to 5:00pm, Friday 16th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center