Sessions at PyGotham on Saturday 17th September

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  • 1 day Intro to Python, 1 day Intro to Django: Day 2

    by gloriajw

    See Intro description. There is no additional cost, but these classes require pre registration. Limited seating available.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 3, Executive Conference Center

  • A Practical Guide to Non-blocking IO, Coroutines, and Concurrency

    by Robert Hancock

    From the OS on up how coroutines and threads affect the performance of your Python programs and who to deal with them.

    At 9:00am to 11:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Publishing: A Way to Contribute Back to Python

    by Debra Williams

    A talk about publishing in the Python market, and how to build up to that. I will talk about how to identify a real need in the community, how to contribute to the knowledge base in the community via documentation/blogging and the ways that publishing has evolved over the past decade.

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

  • Real-time Web: Gevent and Socket.io

    by Rick Copeland

    There has been a lot of talk lately about how Node.js enables the real-time web, but did you know you can do the same thing with Python? This talk will show you how to use Gevent, ZeroMQ, and Socket.io to build portable Python-powered real-time web applications.

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

  • You Can’t Scan for The Stupid Day 2

    by Charles Henderson

    Every developer wants to develop secure code and automated application security tools are an appealing choice for developers who might be looking for a silver bullet. However, manual security testing isn't going anywhere until the HAL application scanner comes online. This developer centric presentation will use often humorous, real-world examples to illustrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of automated solutions and manual techniques.

    Automated tools have some strengths, namely low incremental cost, detecting simple vulnerabilities, and performing highly repetitive tasks.

    However, automated solutions are far from perfect. There are entire classes of vulnerabilities that are theoretically impossible for automated software to detect. Examples include complex information leakage, race conditions, logic flaws, design flaws, and multistage process attacks.

    Beyond that, there are many vulnerabilities that are too complicated or obscure to practically detect with an automated tool.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 4, Executive Conference Center

  • Being There: Encouraging Diversity in Open Source Communities

    by Steve Holden

    Recently the open source community (or a subset of it) has started to realize that in some ways it compares rather unfavorably with the mainstream IT industry. One such way is gender diversity: the industry's ~20% female staffing is six to ten times better than that of most open source communities.

    Steve draws on his own and others' experience to suggest that there are many benefits to having the geek world better reflect the rich diversity of human society, and on the way offers his opinions on a variety of related and unrelated topics.

    Whisky may be consumed during this presentation [if permitted by licensing regulations and the lunar calendar].

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

  • BOSC: Blender Open Sound Control

    by Luke Schantz

    Blender Open Sound Control is a project enabling the use of Open Sound Control Messages within the Blender Game Engine.

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Coders and non-coders need each other — how do we bring them together?

    by Chrys Wu

    This talk will look at the different cultures and some examples of what's working — and what the benefit is for everyone.

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

  • Benchmarking RAID arrays & Making Your Database Scream Day 2

    by Brennan McNenly

    At 10:45am to 11:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 4, Executive Conference Center

  • Hacking Venture Financing - Offering Return While Maximizing Your Own Gains

    by Joe Williams

    There’s more than one way to finance your business, but it seems the technology world hears the most about venture capital and angel investments. Raising money from each type of investor has its own limitations and the costs may not be initially apparent. This talk will make sense of various equity, debt, and royalty financing methods by comparing a business’ perspective toward financial outcomes to that of each type of investors'. We will also cover why the traditional capital markets for early stage business are evolving. You will learn how to evaluate which capital option (or combination) is best for your own company.

    At 11:00am to 11:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

  • The Holographic Feed: 4D Problem-Solving and Perception Enhancement in Python

    by David Nevins

    A holographic platform will advance digital tool-making capabilities, creating opportunities to rethink interoperability, portability, ownership and security.

    Some of these issues are not as new as they may seem. Precedent set 150 years ago in solving global clock simultaneity applies today in solving interoperability by means of a holographic feed, synchronizing data for rendering.

    As databases get huge, resolution is reduced. 4D renderings enhance and extend the human capacity for pattern matching and act as a kind of perceptual faculty. Renderings of relationships between diverse data types make antecedents and dependencies, cause and effect, more clear.

    Python is ideal because of its versatility importing data formats and outputs. Prototype in Python, Unity 3D gaming platform and MongoDB will be demo'd.

    At 11:00am to 11:45am, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

  • Building scalable websites and APIs with Brubeck

    by James Dennis

    In this talk I intend to teach people who know nothing about Brubeck how to build and deploy an entire site, providing all the commonly needed functionality we expect from other Python web frameworks.

    At 1:15pm to 2:45pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Intro to the Pyramid Web Framework

    by Brian Cajes

    Pyramid is a fast, lightweight, and extensible web framework backed by an active open source community. This talk will provide an intro to Pyramid, compare it to other popular web frameworks, walk through some use-cases (including integration with MongoDB), and give tips for developing web apps using the framework.

    At 1:15pm to 2:00pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 6, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Plover: Thought to Text at 240 WPM

    by Mirabai Knight

    Realtime stenography lets you type as quickly as you can speak, but until now it's required ridiculously expensive hardware and software. Plover is the world's first open source steno software and works with a $45 keyboard.

    At 1:15pm to 2:00pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • pytracemonitor

    by David Jensen

    A debugging utility which records program objects as the program is executing. The objects are printed on screen and/or saved in a file. A simple case is relevent local variables, name of current function as well as line number and source code. A goal is to be simple to use and independent of actual Python systems utilities.

    At 1:15pm to 2:00pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

  • What's the Hubbub on Compliance? Day 2

    by Scott Walters

    You've probably heard about, or been exposed to, many different compliance regulations these days such as SAS70, SSAE16, PCI, HIPPAA, SOX, etc. What do they all mean and why have they been put into place? I will answer those questions and also cover some lessons learned during implementation and on-going support of environments that need to be compliant. I will also go over open source tools that can effective to help met compliance regulations.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 4, Executive Conference Center

  • Powerful Pythonic data analysis using pandas

    by Wes McKinney

    In this talk I will give an overview on the pandas data analysis package for Python, its features, and plans for future development. I'll use various interesting data sets to illustrate the features and give motivation for how the tools can be applied in a diverse set of fields.

    At 2:15pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Python and MongoDB in Astronomy

    by Daniel Foreman-Mackey

    The field of Observational Astrophysics is beginning to focus on huge datasets covering large portions of the sky over long time periods. This yields an immensely rich dataset but the traditional scientific workflow can no longer efficiently work on these scales. As a graduate student in Astrophysics, I will discuss the growing role of Python in our scientific research development cycle and present several case studies where MongoDB has been an integral component of the workflow.

    At 2:15pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 5, Executive Conference Center

  • Go Go Gadget Python

    by Nicholas Waite

    So you know that embedded devices are everywhere. Perhaps you've thought how nice it would be to make a linux USB driver for some windows-only device, or you've got something proprietary you would like to reverse-engineer and repurpose for your next big scheme. We know python can do pretty much anything inside the computer--but how does a software person enter the world of circuits? And once you have some circuits, how can you bring the data back into your box?

    Bridging the worlds of hardware and software, I will show the power of PyUSB & Pyserial to pwn some sweet hardware and charm it over the USB port. From my own trials and tribulations building and hacking real devices, from a simple HID-class USB missile launcher to the custom protocol used in a complex biomedical data acquisition system, you will learn about USB packet sniffing, rapid-prototyping device drivers in python, and deciphering circuit boards and data sheets for fun & profit. I aim to leave you armed and ready to take on hardware of your own.

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 2, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video

  • Machine Learning for Web Developers

    by Al Barrentine

    Machine learning deals with a class of algorithms which improve and evolve as they process more data. It has wide-ranging applications in recommendations, search, spam/fraud detection, facial recognition and other areas.

    The algorithms themselves will be covered but the real focus of this class is on how to use said algorithms in the web applications we work on every day. I'll try to keep the math and notation relatively light. Most of the algorithms you'll need to get started with machine learning are implemented for you in the various libraries. They comprise the "science" of machine learning and I hope you will decide to learn it, but mastering that material is a significant commitment of your time and mental energy (and has some additional prerequisites including a strong understanding of linear algebra). This class will focus on the "art" of machine learning, how to think about machine learning algorithms and integrate them into your web application.

    At 3:15pm to 4:45pm, Saturday 17th September

    In Room 1, Executive Conference Center

    Coverage video