Sessions at PyOhio 2011 with video on Saturday 30th July

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  • Data-Transfer Objects Are a Disease. Meet the Cure.

    by Aaron Oliver

    Data Transfer Objects (DTOs) are commonplace. Every time you want to shuffle data and be object-oriented about it, you crank out a new class. But then someone extends it for their purposes. Badly. Then someone ELSE extends it AGAIN and makes thing worse.

    Learn what makes our brains want to create DTOs, how they've been (ab)used in the past, and how Python's namedtuple makes it all better.

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Python 101

    by Michael Yanovich

    Are you completely new to Python? Have you been wanting to learn Python but haven't had the time? Well give you a crash course on the basics of Python. We'll start off with why Python is unique compared to other languages and then quickly start into basic syntax, data types, and the Python philosophy for coding.

    At 10:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Toilets and Teleports - A study in Model-View-Control (MVC)

    by Howard Mooneyham

    Have you ever wondered how to create a Model View Control program? Come to my talk and we will go through building a simple MVC program, Toilets and Teleports. We will then use one of the benefits of MVC to replace the View with a production quality version with GUI no other changes. I will pass out flow charts and documents showing how the program was created.

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Aspen: A Next-generation Web Framework

    by Chad Whitacre

    Aspen is a Python web framework for both realtime and traditional web apps. It makes the most of the filesystem to reduce boilerplate and configuration to near zero. Simplates are the main attraction, a unique approach that brings logic and presentation as close together as possible--without mixing them. http://aspen.io/

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 30th July

  • PHP to Python with No Regrets

    by Alex Ezell

    At Emma, we are transforming an eight year old PHP codebase into an API-driven service written in Python. Facing down the triple threat of bad data, encoding issues, and a generation of code cruft, we've begun to see the light of day. Come hear how we did it, where we fell down and where we're succeeding.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Django and Google App Engine: Why I'm using Flask and Amazon EC2

    by Ben Rousch

    I'm a lazy coder, but not the good kind of lazy. I dove into Django so I could have one web framework that would work on many kind of hosting setups and for any kind of web project. With some modifications, I could even use the laziest application host, Google App Engine. Some of these decisions didn't work out, so I'll share some of the lessons I've learned the past year or so.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Multi-player Games using Panda3D and Python

    by Peter Carswell

    This two-hour tutorial is designed to investigate the implementation of a multi-player game using the game engine Panda3D. Panda3D's intended game-development language is Python. The concepts involve Object Oriented Programming structures, modeling and texture mapping, key-binding motion, collisions and, finally, networking techniques.

    At 1:30pm to 3:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Names, Objects, and Plummeting From The Cliff

    by Brandon Rhodes

    The assignment statement is often the second thing a new Python programmer learns, right after the "print" statement - but the beginner can get seriously bogged down in all of the concepts that assignment involves! Using a simple analogy, this talk will tackle those issues head-on.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Interactive command-line interpreters with cmd and cmd2

    by Catherine Devlin

    How should your Python program receive commands and deliver results? If an interactive command-line interpreter is right for you, you're in luck - Python's got some great batteries included for you.

    At 2:30pm to 3:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Bringing Modern Python to the Atari

    by Jeffrey Armstrong

    The Atari ST continues to fulfill a niche in the computing world amongst hobbyists. Porting CPython to the 32-bit Atari platforms and clones introduces a number of challenges related to incomplete Unicode implementation, threading issues, and dealing with shared libraries. The attempt at porting Python 2.7.1 and the addition of an Atari-specific Python extension will be discussed.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • SqlAlchemy tutorial

    by Rick Harding

    SqlAlchemy is one of the top 5 'must have' modules for Python. We'll go through why you might want to use an ORM, situations to use the different layers of SqlAlchemy, and some tips and tricks on a real sample application.

    At 3:30pm to 5:30pm, Saturday 30th July

  • Using machine learning tools to cluster twitter users

    by Timmy Wilson

    Journey through the thoughts, hopes, and sad frustrations of an average python developer using modern machine learning tools to analyze the twitter social graph.

    I'll walk through the motivation, tools, and obstacles related to large graph analysis, and talk specifically about the twitter api, graphlab, mongodb, ec2, and using python to glue everything together.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Consuming Web APIs with Python

    by Issac Kelly

    Issac will go over the basics of HTTP apis, what to look for, basic authorization methods, and how to interface with them in your python scripts. There will not be cake.

    At 4:30pm to 5:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video

  • Squinting at Python Objects

    by Brandon Rhodes

    Python classes can gain attributes as if by magic. Thanks to properties, descriptors, and (if all else fails) ``__getattr__()`` and ``__getattribute__()``, the attempt to access ``obj.something`` can result in arbitrary code execution. If you are wondering how your Python program is using memory, this can result in a problem: each time you look to see if something is there, it *is*, because it is pulled in dynamically the moment you look for it. In this talk, you will learn how to prod Python objects gently, and hopefully learn their secrets - and their memory usage - without actually invoking code.

    At 4:30pm to 5:30pm, Saturday 30th July

    Coverage video