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Sessions at Software Architect 2011 about .NET

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Tuesday 18th October 2011

  • Patterns and principles that matter in .NET [workshop]

    by Dave Wheeler

    Patterns come in all shapes and sizes. From the GoF Design Patterns for structuring object-oriented code through to some of Martins Fowler’s Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, patterns are everywhere. And, to be frank, some are more important than others.
    In this fun (and heavily code-oriented day), we’ll work through numerous patterns and see how they impact your code and architecture. There’ll be a trip into the world of Inversion of Control (IoC) and Dependency Injection (DI), and how this helps support testing and maintainability.
    There’ll be Models, Views, Controllers and even ViewModels hanging out in the presentation tier.
    We’ll step into the world of the Repository Pattern, with a side order of Unit of Work, and how that helps isolate our domain model from our underlying database.
    And we’ll look at different approaches to constructing the business logic layer, analysing their pros and cons.
    This is a highly practical, code and best-practice focused day for developers and architects who want to ensure that they’re building solid, maintainable and testable code.

    At 9:30am to 5:30pm, Tuesday 18th October

  • Pragmatic .NET architecture [workshop]

    by Oliver Sturm

    Planning application architecture is a complex task which requires detailed understanding of the technological platforms that you’re targeting. This whole-day workshop leads you through the process of creating an architectural concept for a medium size distributed .NET application: data access, distribution, services, layering concerns, UI platforms and presentation patterns – every topic is considered. Oliver lets you participate and benefit from his experiences from project work and consulting – architects, programmers and owners of other job titles are all equally welcome!

    At 9:30am to 5:30pm, Tuesday 18th October

Wednesday 19th October 2011

  • NoSQL solutions on the .NET platform: what’s all the fuss about?

    by Jesus Rodriguez

    Non-relational databases have recently emerged as one of the hottest areas in software development. While many people are under the impression that the .NET platform is behind the curve on this, in fact there are several open source initiatives that bring NoSQL databases to the .NET platform. As .NET developers, we can take full advantage of the benefits of several NoSQL technologies in our enterprise solutions. This session explores various open source non-relational database technologies available in the Microsoft.NET platform, and the techniques and interfaces that can be used to interact with NoSQL technologies such as MongoDB, CouchDB or MencacheDB. We’ll also emphasise the aspects of NoSQL solutions that complement traditional relational database models in areas such as unstructured data indexing, archiving, map reduce techniques, demoralisation, among many others.

    At 11:30am to 1:00pm, Wednesday 19th October

  • MEF in a hurry

    by Dave Wheeler

    The Managed Extensibility Framework, or MEF for short, is an excellent way of structuring applications in .NET. This session focuses on how you might use MEF as more than just a simple IoC container, examining everything from the basics of importing and exporting parts through to dynamic re-composition and flexible deployment catalogs.
    MEF is a rising star in the .NET firmament. Come to this session to see how it might fit into your application architecture.

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Wednesday 19th October

  • Software project SOS

    by Simon Brown

    The more vocal in our industry would have you believe that all software teams consist of agile test-driven craftsmen using the latest and greatest technology. This is the real world though, and a number of things often get in the way. This session puts you in the shoes of somebody that has been asked to rescue a struggling .NET project. What are the problems and how would *you* put the project back on track?

    At 4:00pm to 5:30pm, Wednesday 19th October

Thursday 20th October 2011

  • Designing & building services the web & HTTP way with WCF 4.5

    by Christian Weyer

    The Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) has had basic support for building HTTP-enabled services since .NET 3.5. But now new & powerful features are available that let you design and implement an even more HTTP- and web-centric view on your service-oriented applications. Christian will show you how to build WCF services that can leverage the full power of HTTP. Come and learn how to create & expose HTTP-based services and also consume REST APIs in .NET and on mobile platforms.

    At 9:30am to 11:00am, Thursday 20th October

  • LINQ and the Reactive Framework – a powerful new way to write code

    by Richard Blewett

    Reactive Framework is a new library that uses the new IObservable interface and LINQ to create a compelling new programming model that allows you to build “event” based code with declarative LINQ statements. This talk introduces the Reactive Framework and shows how it can greatly simplify your code.

    At 9:30am to 11:00am, Thursday 20th October

  • Parallel patterns

    by Andrew Clymer

    Herb Sutter famously coined the phrase “the free lunch is over” back in 2005, when it became clear that processor clock speeds were no longer obeying Moore’s law. If developers wanted applications to go faster they could no longer rely on greater clock speeds, they would need to think differently and restructure their code to take advantage of multiple cores in order to get better and better performance. It turns out parallelising all but the most trivial piece of code is challenging. .NET 4 attempts to assist the developer by providing support in the framework to assist parallelising algorithms through the use of parallel constructs like Parallel.For, and Parallel LINQ and a variety of concurrent data structures. The framework vendors would like you to believe that the free lunch is now back, but whilst they can deliver a moderate free lunch, if you truly want a gut-busting free lunch you will have to deploy a range of tricks for your algorithm to take full advantage of those multiple cores.

    At 9:30am to 11:00am, Thursday 20th October

  • Architecting async UIs using C# 5 and beyond

    by Andrew Clymer

    NET 4 introduced the new ‘task’ abstraction, and C#5 will take advantage of integrating this task abstraction into the language via the async and await keywords. Furthermore, the new task abstraction promotes a new way of architecting asynchronous behaviour; in this talk we will explore how to take advantage of these new keywords and other new types and features being exposed in the next version of .NET to deliver far simpler asynchronous Windows UIs.

    At 11:30am to 1:00pm, Thursday 20th October

  • M-V-VM from the ground up

    by Dave Wheeler

    M-V-VM (or Model, View, ViewModel) is a critical pattern for modern WPF and Silverlight development.
    But how do you actually do it?
    And what are the benefits?
    This hard core, deep dive session will examine all aspects of the M-V-VM pattern; its benefits, problems, consequences, and all of its warts.
    This session is a must for anyone working in a modern Windows and .NET application environment.

    At 11:30am to 1:00pm, Thursday 20th October

  • Windows Azure Platform for architects

    by Christian Weyer

    As a solution architect you should be aware of the benefits (and the risks) of Cloud computing. In this session Christian Weyer will walk you through the holistic set of Cloud features that the Windows Azure Platform (WAP) offers. Whether you want to run applications and services in Windows Azure, store data in Windows Azure or SQL Azure or securely communicate with and through the Cloud with the help of the Windows Azure AppFabric: come and see a pragmatic view on WAP and learn which slice of the Cloud may fit for you.

    At 11:30am to 1:00pm, Thursday 20th October

  • Advanced M-V-VM

    by Dave Wheeler

    Most M-V-VM demos stop with a single Model, View and ViewModel.
    Not this session.
    We’ll take a hard look at multiple ViewModels; central commanding (such as File, Save All); isolation and testing; secondary UI and interaction between a View and a ViewModel; and robust and reliable messaging.
    This is an important session for those wanting to move beyond the trivial reference implementations seen in Prism or on the web.

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Thursday 20th October

  • Making WCF simple: best practices for testing, deploying and managing WCF solutions in the big enterprise

    by Jesus Rodriguez

    During the past few years, Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) has established itself as the fundamental technology to enable service orientation in the Microsoft platform. However, adopting WCF in the big enterprise requires complementing the sophisticated capabilities of WCF with efficient practices in areas such as configuration management, unit/load testing, dependency management, and versioning among many others. Enabling these capabilities facilitates the adoption of WCF in the enterprise in an agile and simple manner. This session presents a series of solutions and best practices for addressing important aspects such as configuration management, endpoint discovery, automated unit/load testing, service dependencies, etc. We illustrate these solutions using a series of practical demonstrations that will help developers to implement large WCF solutions in a more efficient and agile manner. Additionally, the session presents three case studies that highlight how customers are implementing some of these solutions to adopt WCF at a big scale in the enterprise.

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Thursday 20th October

  • Entity Framework and the repository pattern

    by Andrew Clymer

    .NET 4 comes with a version of Entity Framework that is fit for purpose. Entity Framework is Microsoft’s ORM, their version of NHibernate. Entity Framework version 1 forced developers to be tightly coupled to Entity Framework, this goes against traditional ORM technology and creates problems for unit testing. Entity Framework 4 fixes this problem via POCO support. However it is still up to developers to work out how to utilise the technology to truly loosely couple application logic from business logic. This talk will take you through these new features and show how the repository pattern can be deployed with Entity Framework to provide a testable and loosely coupled solution.

    At 4:00pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 20th October

Friday 21st October 2011

  • A day of building web applications the .NET 4.0 way [workshop]

    by Richard Blewett and Andrew Clymer

    .NET 4.0 introduced a number of technologies into the .NET world. This workshop looks not only at these technologies but, more importantly, how they can be combined into compelling applications.
    We will cover ASP.NET MVC3, WCF 4.0, Workflow 4.0 and Entity Framework 4.0 along the way, and show you not only the benefits of these technologies but also where they can cause problems.
    During the workshop we will build a functional n-tier application that demonstrates the technologies “in-situ” and shows patterns that you can use to keep your architecture clean.

    At 9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 21st October

  • Inside Prism and MEF [workshop]

    by Dave Wheeler

    If you’re architecting and building big WPF or Silverlight applications, then it’s a fair bet that you should be considering using either (or both) of MEF or Prism.
    The Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF) makes it easy to build pluggable, flexible applications. Prism provides rich guidance and sample (reference) implementations to help you build large, modular applications.
    This workshop provides an intensive day working with these two complementary technologies. We’ll begin by building a modular application comparing and contrasting approaches that we can take using MEF and Prism. We’ll examine shells, catalogues and containers. We’ll drill down into building region-based UIs, and we’ll power through commands and loose pub/sub event architectures.
    Throughout the day, you’ll see how to combine MEF and Prism, and how you might go it alone with just MEF or Prism. Plus you’ll see how to handle issues such as deployment and versioning.
    The session assumes no prior knowledge of MEF or Prism (although we will go deep quickly!), but you should already have a basic knowledge of Silverlight or WPF.

    At 9:30am to 5:30pm, Friday 21st October