Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 about Journalism on Saturday 12th March

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  • Changing News Rooms and News Consumers

    by Bruce Koon, Andrew Haeg, Emily Bell and Lisa Frazier

    How are newsrooms adjusting to the changing digital news environment? How do they balance transparency and objectivity? How are news consumers responding to information published in new ways? What behaviors and skills are news consumers developing to help them negotiate and evaluate the validity and trustworthiness of the news? What mores and values are emerging from news producers and consumers?

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • The Impact of Social Media Tools in Mexico

    by Amy Schmitz Weiss, Gabriela Warkentin, Judith Torrea, David Sasaki and Javier Garza

    This panel provides a unique perspective to the development and impact of social media tools in Mexico today. This panel features journalists from Mexico who will discuss how they use social media tools in their news organizations on a daily basis. In addition, they will discuss how Mexican citizens are using Twitter as a way to respond the lack of information in the newspapers that are under threat of drug traffickers. As news organizations have been forced to practice self-censorship after so many assassinations and kidnappings of journalists, citizens and even journalists have been using social media as the last resort to spread the news. In addition, Twitter has been used by the local Mexican government to inform the citizenry about dangerous areas because of drug trafficking. The journalists in this panel will discuss their own experience and use of social media, but also how society is using it.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Sabine, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

  • Brand Journalism: The Rise of Non-Fiction Advertising

    by Bob Garfield, David Eastman, Kyle Monson and Brian Clark

    Hard to believe it's been 11 years since The Cluetrain Manifesto, and we're still doing the same f***ing panel. And we're still trying to teach big companies and ad agencies how to communicate like humans, how to listen, and how to use transparency as a messaging tactic.

    Brand Journalism is a way to take those decade-old ideas and incorporate them into actual campaigns (we know, we've done it). The first step is to teach agencies and clients to think like publishers instead of marketers--it's not a new idea, but it's one that is rarely executed well.

    In this panel, Brand Journalism pioneers will share some of the secrets, successes, and obstacles of their award-winning campaigns.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom F, Austin Convention Center

  • Open Wide: New Models for Public Media

    by Greg Pak, Orlando Bagwell, Sue Schardt and Jacquie Jones

    Interactive graphic novel mash ups, mobile transmedia scavenger hunts, service corps? As innovative technologies transform our society, encouraging and strengthening civic participation, conversation and interaction through social and mobile media, great concern still exists regarding the accessibility of credible and up-to-date information among communities of color, low-income users, senior citizens and others. A growing consensus is that today’s public media must do more to fully reflect the public’s needs and engage the entire range of community members at the local level. As noted in the influential 2009 Knight Commission report, Informing Communities: Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age, America needs to support local resources and institutions to ensure that democratic values of openness, inclusion, participation, and empowerment thrive across all appropriate media, engaging members of the public in their role as active citizens. But what are the elements of a 21st century public media that meets the needs of our increasingly diverse and sophisticated publics? Who are the partners poised to realize the vision of Public Media 2.0, to create an ecosystem that is “more local, more inclusive and more interactive,” as the Knight Commission Report put it. Architects of and participants in three provocative prototypes that push the boundaries of public media will share their experiences working with communities of various kinds, with various needs to create new models.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Capitol View Terrace, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Yes, It's Quiz Time: News as Infotainment

    by Evan Smith, Julia Turner and Elise Hu

    Comedy shows and interactive quizzes have become popular ways to consume journalism today. This session will address the successes and limits of providing serious news in entertaining ways.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Bloggers vs. Journalists: It's a Psychological Thing

    by Lisa Williams and Jay Rosen

    I wrote my essay, Bloggers vs. Journalists is Over, in 2005. And it should be over. After all, lots of journalists happily blog, lots of bloggers journalize and everyone is trying to figure out what's sustainable online. But there's something else going on, and I think I've figured out a piece of it: these two Internet types, amateur bloggers and pro journalists, are actually each other's ideal "other."

    A big reason they keep struggling with each other lies at the level of psychology, not in the particulars of the disputes and flare-ups that we continue to see online. The relationship is essentially neurotic, on both sides. Bloggers can't let go of Big Daddy media— the towering figure of the MSM — and still be bloggers. Pro journalists, meanwhile, project fears about the Internet and loss of authority onto the figure of the pajama-wearing blogger. This is a construction of their own and a key part of a whole architecture of denial that has weakened in recent years, but far too slowly.

    The only way we can finally kill this meme--bloggers vs. journalists--and proceed into a brighter and pro-am future for interactive journalism is to go right at the psychological element in it: the denial, the projection, the neuroses, the narcissism, the grandiosity, the rage, the fears of annihilation: the monsters of the id in the newsroom, and the fantasy of toppling the MSM in the blogosphere. That is what my solo presentation will be about: a tale of the Internet, told through types.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • How PBS and NPR Can Support Local Journalism

    by Amy Shaw, Kevin Dando, Tom Davidson and Jan Schaffer

    As the digital revolution decimates traditional local news media, a variety of new organizations are emerging – fitfully – to fill the gaps. Some of their challenges, such as content creation and technology, are relatively easy to solve. But others – building an audience and finding sustainable revenues – are much harder. In this session, you’ll learn about current and upcoming experiments, partnerships and models – and how PBS, NPR and their member stations can support this new local-news ecosystem.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Capitol View Terrace, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol