Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 about Design

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Friday 11th March 2011

  • How Not to Design Like a Developer

    by Chrissie Brodigan

    Open source projects, in particular, have long skimped on presentation and packaging (basically, they are the equivalent of "she has a great personality!" in the world of blind dating).

    This talk is on how designer (graphic, UI & UX, all deft ninjas of the visual and editorial) organize and contribute their visual hacks to open source projects, working in tandem with engineers. Specifically, we'll look at how designers can get involved with Mozilla's Creative Collective, as well as how developers can leverage some of lessons learned by Mozilla's workflow and community-organizing techniques to foster their own design communities and inspire individuals to contribute to other open source projects of all sizes.

    People who have contributed to or are working on an open source project, do so in an effort to create and distribute free software (free as in “free speech” v. free as in “drinks on me tonight!”*). This is a great opportunity to get involved with a team and movement (or start your own) that making a better and more awesome internet. As a bonus, contributing to open source is also a great way to enhance your portfolio, discover the brightest people, and create career-inspiring opportunities for yourself and your peers.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 11th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Google Doodles: Burning Man to Pac-Man and Beyond

    by Ryan Germick and Marcin Wichary

    With over 700 fun and geeky custom logos adorning Google’s international homepages, "doodles" have become synonymous with the Google brand. Through a visual feast of never-before-seen high-res art and outtakes, this presentation will examine the history, popularity, and controversy of Google doodles from the perspective of the small team of artists and developers who create them. This being SXSW Interactive, we will highlight the ingenuity behind special doodles like the playable Pac-Man and animated Rube Goldberg/Fourth of July doodles. We also will take a look behind the scenes of the H.G. Wells mystery doodles, the week that the Sesame Street muppets took over Google, the action-packed Olympics series, and more ways we play on our homepage. Finally, we’ll touch on the feedback we receive, lessons learned, the Doodle4Google children’s art competition, what it takes to be a Google Doodler, and the future of Google doodles.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 11th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Creative Workshop: 80 Challenges to Sharpen Your Design Skills

    by David Sherwin

    You're under the gun. Again. Only a few days to come up with a revolutionary new feature for your Web app. Or you've been tasked by your boss to give the company's new mobile experience a little more oomph. In these situations, it can be hard to focus on coming up with breakthrough ideas. But don't worry, help is to the rescue. David Sherwin from frog design, a global innovation firm, will share tools and methods that any interactive professional can use to more consistently brainstorm quality ideas for interactive products and services. This presentation will be illustrated with examples from David's new book "Creative Workshop: 80 Challenges to Sharpen Your Design Skills" (HOW Books).

    At 5:30pm to 6:30pm, Friday 11th March

    In Ballroom G, Austin Convention Center

Saturday 12th March 2011

  • Designing Stuff Kids Will Use and Love

    by Silvia Lovato, Rick Pinchera, Dan Willis and Chris Bishop

    PBS KIDS has been designing non-commercial websites and interactive games for kids for over 10 years. Making an interactive product that appeals, engages and is usable by a child is not as simple as using Comic Sans and replacing an “S” with a “Z”. Children's abilities change rapidly and producers need to ensure that products are developmentally accessible. This session will focus on designing for two audiences: pre-readers (3-5) and readers (6-8), through four case-studies revealing how and why design choices were made based on experience, user testing and informed guesses.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • iPad Design Headaches (Take 2 Tablets, Call Me in the Morning)

    by Josh Clark

    The iPad and its entourage of Android tablets have introduced a new style of computing, confronting designers with unfamiliar aches and pains. Learn the symptoms (and fixes) for a range of new-to-the-world iPad interface ailments, including Greedy Pixel Syndrome, the dreaded Frankeninterface, and the "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" bait and switch. Explore practical techniques and eye-opening gotchas of tablet interface design, all grounded in the ergonomics, context, psychology, and nascent culture of these new devices (both iOS and Android). The presentation inoculates you against common problems with close-up looks at successful iPad apps from early sketches to final design. Genial bedside manner is administered by Josh Clark, author of the O'Reilly books "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps" and "Best iPhone Apps: A Guide for Discriminating Downloaders."

    LEVEL: Advanced

  • It's About Time: Visualizing Temporality

    by Joanna Wiebe

    Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana. I agree about the banana, but I'm not so sure about the arrow. What is the shape of time? Our online calendars, clocks and other models of time often are designed with the understanding that time is a forward-moving arrow. This sounds logical to the Western, English-speaking scientific mind. However, not everyone conceptualizes time as a relentless hurtling forward. Some cultures understand time as a fractal, a spiral, a mandala, a cycle. And a child, playing with the same toy over and over again, lives in a single seamless moment from dawn to dusk. Visualizing temporality is a fundamental issue in interaction design today. For example, we are looking at a future where our work must be useful for both Eastern and Western audiences, who differ in time-oriented cultural traits such as long-term vs. short-term orientation. We also need to be able to provide tools to differentiate the personal, bodily-felt experience of time from clock time. We may want to expand our customers' perception of time, to invite them to stay in the Deep Present. Our beliefs about time and its passage profoundly affect the design of software and interactive media. It's time for interaction designers to understand deeply how our customers know time, whether as an arrow, a spiral or a squiggle. How people slice and dice nature into concepts is fundamental to designing tools people can use to successfully live on the earth, for a long time.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

  • "It's Nature's Way": Innovative Tech Design Through Biomimicry

    by Kathleen Zarsky, Michael Dungan, Chris Allen and Holly Harlan

    A social network that functions like a colony of ants. A database that manages and shares information like a slime mold. What can we learn from the obvious? Millions of years of royalty free R&D embedded in nature holds the answers to many of today’s human centered design challenges. In this presentation, co-facilitated by Chris Allen of The Biomimicry Institute and Michael Dungan of BeeDance LLC, learn how a systems approach that mimics nature’s lessons and resiliency can be adapted to technology design. Biomimicry is a proven design process that asks nature for advice. The application of biomimicry is responsible for the development of successful products ranging from Velcro™ and photovoltaic solar panels to advanced seawater desalination methods and more efficient Japanese bullet trains. Bringing a biologist to the design table to explore innovation in IT application development and optimization can unlock new discoveries. The teachings of specific champions in nature that will lead to break-through design thinking will be offered during the presentation. When approached as mentor, model and measure, organisms and whole systems found in the natural world become powerful collaborators. As B2B and B2C users continue to seek out more robust, fast and reliable forms of technology, the answers may not be in the room, but right outside the window.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • Ordering Disorder: Grid Design for the New World

    by Khoi Vinh

    Everyone's using grids, and grid tools and frameworks are everywhere. But do you truly understand the ins and outs of this powerful design principle, and how it's changing along with new media and platforms? Chances are most digital designers have only a cursory knowledge of the grid's concepts and best practices, overlooking the tremendous value that truly smart grid usage brings.

    In this expansive sequel to his famous 2006 SXSWi talk "Grids Are Good," designer and grid expert Khoi Vinh (NYTimes.com, Subtraction.com) will give a bracing tour of the many ideas packed into his forthcoming book "Ordering Disorder: Grid Principles for Web Design." This solo talk will span the history of grids, take a brass-tacks tour of best practices, and look ahead at some of the most enlightening and innovative thinking that's shaping grid thinking in the future.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • Metrics-Driven Design

    by Joshua Porter

    For every design change you make affecting your user’s experience, do you know if you’re having a positive or negative impact? Are you adding to your organization’s bottom line or eroding it? Are you sure? Or, are you like most design teams who release work through a ramshackle process made up of politics, prayer, and paralysis?

    The health of the business must be the highest priority for designers. With a plethora of fast and cheap analytics tools available that bring us the ability to measure almost anything, we have no excuse not to be measuring every design change we make. From a/b testing small interface tweaks to measuring time-on-site for new users to measuring user satisfaction over long time periods, we can know more about the people who use our software than ever before.

    In this talk, Joshua Porter will provide you with a simple, easy framework for metrics-driven design. By using a combination of research methods as well as powerful new tracking tools, Josh will show you how to align your design priorities with what keeps you in business. You will come away from this talk with a clear idea of what metrics are most important, which ones to focus on, and which ones to ignore. So don’t drive blindly: use metrics-driven design to make sure the impact you’re having is a positive one.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage note

Sunday 13th March 2011

  • Creative and Effective Leadership in Design Environments

    by Sarah Nelson

    A search on Amazon shows 62,000+ books on leadership but almost nothing to help creative team leaders build and sustain a creative environment. Creativity and innovation can be delicate and emotionally fraught processes. Leadership theories are helpful, but what do you do when your star designer suddenly starts mailing it in? Or a project team is frozen in infighting? Or one of your designers just can't find their footing in a new project? When you got your big promotion for being an amazing designer, no one told you that you needed an entirely new skill set. Sink or swim, baby.

    For this session, Sarah B. Nelson gets practical on the topic of creative leadership. From vision development to team alignment, from bottom-up empowerment to top-down intervention, Sarah will inspire you with practical ideas to motivate your team and rouse them to greatness. She will draw on her extensive experience leading creative teams at Adaptive Path and Hot Studio -- and inform the discussion with research and interviews from organizational psychologists, experienced managers, and successful creative leaders.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Dork Intervention: Bringing Design to Agile

    by Kris Corzine and Karl Nieberding

    Agile is broken. With large corporations rapidly adopting agile, it is crucial that these teams include designers to create great products. Agile, by its nature, shortcuts the design process without considering the value that design brings, not only in providing on-the-fly design solutions but also crafting the vision of a product that the team can work towards. In the agile framework available to larger companies, there isn’t structure in place that takes into account the work style of design team members. Why is this important? Because design needs more than 5 minutes. How can designers help teams deliver high quality products while grappling with the excruciating constraints of agile? We are designers on an agile team in the corporate world. These are our stories of triumph and tragedy. Come hear what worked for us and share your own war stories.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Design-Driven Innovation: How Designers Facilitate the Dialog

    by Jim Nieters and Carola Thompson

    In the real world, coming up with a breakthrough idea doesn’t mean it will get to market. By nature, innovative ideas are different and represent new ways of thinking. Getting stakeholders to recognize the value of these market-shaking ideas, buy into and support them, and agree to build them, requires a new kind of design skill: facilitation. This session will show how leading innovation workshops (collaborative design workshops) not only brings UX to the strategy table, but it invents a new table at which strategic ideation and dialog can take place constructively.

    In this session, two designers will show how they have lead very different types of innovation workshops to generate creative new ideas, get stakeholders aligned around those ideas, and drive those innovations to market. They will share their favorite methods for getting cross-functional groups to ideate, filter ideas using the innovation funnel, and align organizations around a common vision for breakthrough evolution. They will also post instructions for conducting successful innovation workshops.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon E, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Non-Visual Augmented Reality and the Evaporation of the Interface

    by Aaron Parecki and Amber Case

    This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We’ll cover alternate types of augmented reality techniques and how they have been saving us time in the past few months. We’ll demonstrate how we’ve been merging available technologies with custom programming to create location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification. Finally, we’ll describe other uses for location sharing, such as automatically turning off house lights when leaving for work, wayfinding with piezoelectric buzzers, geonotes and other mashups that can be done using sms, gps, x-10 and irc as a control hub.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Town Lake Ballroom, Radisson Hotel & Suites Austin-Town Lake

  • Media Tomorrow: The Message is the Messenger

    by Jenn Van Grove, Jeremiah Owyang, Leslie Bradshaw, Joe Chernov and Sarah Evans

    Disruptive technologies and corroding trust in business have combined turn Marshall McLuhan’s adage “the medium is the message” inside out. Information now spreads laterally, triggered not by institution but by individual. The message is the messenger. This panel will explore how four individuals are reshaping the design, consulting, PR and journalism industries by understanding how information is consumed today.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Cure for the Common Font

    by Frank Chimero, Jason Santa Maria, Typographica.org, Stephen Coles and Tiffany Wardle

    Hundreds of new typefaces are released every year by hundreds of vendors. Some of these fonts are good for nuts-and-bolts text, some for showing off. Some work well on the web, while most are just awful. A select few are destined to be classics. The sheer volume and variety of options can be overwhelming. So, understandably, most designers just stick to the same old safe standbys they’ve always used — the ones that came with their computer or they learned about in school. The panelists, all typographic experts, will show how they broke free of tired text, sharing their secrets for selecting type, including best practices and personal case studies.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Town Lake Ballroom, Radisson Hotel & Suites Austin-Town Lake

  • Jeffrey Zeldman's Awesome Internet Design Panel

    by Mandy Brown, Dan Mall, Jeffrey Zeldman and Roger Black

    He brought us The Web Standards Project, A List Apart, Designing With Web Standards, A Book Apart, and so much more. Now legendary blogger, designer, and creative gadfly Jeffrey Zeldman brings us a SXSW panel. There will be discussion. There will be special guests. Quotable insights will fly faster than your fingers can peck them into Twitterific. Combustible wit will fill the room. And in the end, we'll all be a little wiser than we were.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

  • Re-branding Birth Control: Behavior Change through Design

    by Lawrence Swiader and Jennifer Maer

    There is a significant gap between intentions and outcomes related to pregnancy; young adults say overwhelmingly that while they don’t want to get pregnant right now, they also are not fully protecting themselves from pregnancy by the careful, consistent use of contraception.

    This session is about a program designed to address that gap called Bedsider.

    We’ll talk about why the gap exists and look at established theories of behavior change for ways to approach the problem.

    We’ll denote a knowledge gap but offer that for most people, intentions are good.  Sex is complicated, messy, emotional, and driven by desire.  Yet most keep trying to attack the problem with logic.  They speak like doctors, appeal to reason, and show pictures of smiling people who look like they’re about to buy a car.

    This session will detail how to apply design thinking to the problem and re-frame birth control.  For most, sex education usually comes at the wrong time, in the wrong context, in the wrong voice.  How might a different tone and branding of birth control affect adherence?  And how do you test for it in developing a program? We will address those questions in our session.

    We’ll talk about how Bedsider has to fit in visually and verbally—it can’t look like the health department—and the role that language plays in attacking the excuses to not use birth control.  In this session we’ll also address how to design for feedback in an area where “nothing” is the usual reward.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Rio, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

Monday 14th March 2011

  • Neurons Sparking!: Design with the Brain in Mind!

    by M A Greenstein

    **Are you curious about the new brain game design industry?

    **Have you explored the options of including a neuroscientist on your team of interactive and immersive media designers?

    Today, interactive and immersive media design draws on contemporary neuroscience to leverage the best odds of playing "somatosensory," "memory," "dopamine reward” and “inhibitory control” systems in the human brain and extended nervous system. From animated narrative scripting to skill building brain games or “apps”, functional knowledge of the human brain gives the 21st media designer an edge in working across the spectrum of interactive and immersive game media.

    This session starts with two simple, critical questions: What does neuroscience and cognitive science hold for the future of interactive and immersive media design? How can media designers prepare now for a future where "brain smart" games will be the means by which we learn, play, invent and transform lives through interactive media? Join us and find out.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Salon D, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Touching Stories: Designing Digital Magazines for the iPad

    by Matthew Carlson and Matthew Davis

    The launch of the iPad signaled the start of a new era for magazine
    publishing. A single device that delivered the fidelity of print and
    the interactivity of the Web, all wrapped up in a fun and easy-to-use
    form factor gave the industry new reason to hope. There was one trick:
    no one had designed for this brave new medium yet. Editorial teams
    suddenly needed to consider multi-touch gestures, multiple
    orientations, dynamic layout and the integration of rich media into
    the design of their issues. Ink-smudged print teams had to reach out
    to the pixel-based life forms in charge of the company Websites, and
    engage a new breed of Cocoa developers as well. Whole new models of
    information design and user experience we're launched at high velocity
    into the App Store.

    Both speakers were involved in designing some of the first digital magazines that launched on the iPad on April 3rd, 2010. They've spent the last year exploring new ways to experience and engage with magazine content on this exciting new platform. Together they've worked on iPad editions of magazines such as Spin, Dwell, National Geographic, Car and Driver and many others. In this session they'll share hard-earned knowledge and useful insights on how to design for gestural interfaces, how to integrate interactivity smoothly into digital magazines and what it takes to build an issue for the iPad.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Transmedia: What's the Magical Formula for Successful Design?

    by Anthea Foyer

    Deep within our secret laboratory, The Labs team of new media scientists work incessantly to discover the secret ingredients of successful transmedia projects. With the recent acceleration of transmedia projects, there have been a lot of successes and failures. But what are the common elements that determine these outcomes? Is it possible to harness them for your own projects? At this session we will reveal our findings to you, our audience. As with any good experiment, however, this will be a participatory event with the audience having the opportunity to become contributors as well. We know you are a smart audience with much to add to the experiment. After the event, our joint findings will be shared online with the world.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:15am to 11:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom E, Austin Convention Center

  • Comedic Communication: Designing for Pleasure and Play

    by Adam Frucci, Baratunde Thurston, Chelsey Delaney and Lisa Cohen

    Reaching disengaged communities usually doesn’t include building an app or a Web site but creating a more tangible experience—And, inspiring those who are long lost to apathy to even consider taking part in this experience is the first and most difficult step. Designers often end up using stereotypical and common forms of serious, logical argument in communicating pertinent issues.

    But many designers have failed to acknowledge a common tool as one of the most powerful rhetorical strategies for use in their work: humor. The majority of publications within the field of humor research have surfaced in the past decade. Design is the one field that has been barely explored as a humorous rhetorical genre. Neglecting humor’s potential eliminates the chance of mastering a method of communication that has an unlimited usage scope because of its cultural role and human value.

    There exists a need for humor to become better understood in communication design both in use and in evaluation. Humor in design, through this panel, can be explored to establish a way of communicating serious issues in a non-intimidating fashion. Discussions would provide advocacy organizations or individuals with new and more effective methods for deeper poignant messaging. The hope in furthering awareness of humor research in design is to significantly add to the area of design for social change using strong emotional approaches. As Mark Twain said, “The secret source of humor is not joy but sorrow.”

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage sketch note

  • All of the fonts you'll ever need – "Design for Hackers" book reading

    by David Kadavy

    There are plenty of tools and tips available for technically applying design to an application or website; but the classical fundamentals that make websites and products beautiful and engaging remain a mystery. David Kadavy - freelance designer to Silicon Valley clients such as oDesk, UserVoice, and PBworks - will provide a sneak preview of content from his book, "Design for Hackers: Reverse-Engineering Beauty." David will explain important differences to be aware of when choosing fonts, as well as present "all of the fonts you'll ever need.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 14th March

    Coverage video

  • Behavior Design: Stop Being Neutral, Start Influencing Decisions

    by Nick Disabato and Chris Risdon

    Design traditionally focuses on creating products and services that recognize an existing behavior and work to support it. The next wave will be products and services that motivate and incentivize change. Design can help us be better at what we do and make us do better things.

    We are in the age of aware tech. People are receiving vast amounts of data about their own actions and patterns. We need to provide them with clever ways to act on that information. Moreover, companies and organizations are seeking out ways to influence customer choices and create social impact, but many designers are hesitant to pursue work that makes choices for people.

    Design has always had an influence, whether recognized or not. It’s time to start seeing that all design choices have an impact, and to start working towards changing the way we live for the better.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 6:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage slide deck

  • Critical Thinking for UX Designers (Or Anyone, Really)

    by Russ U and Christina Wodtke

    Love creative problem solving, but need something more practical - something specific to User Experience? Russ and Stephen will share with you the exercises they use to solve the REAL problems.

    You'll flex your critical thinking muscle through a series of jumpstarter activities. Even better, attendees will be encouraged to participate, if not embarrass themselves in front of a room full of their peers as they challenge themselves to see past the first, obvious - and often incorrect - answers, and start to flip problems on their heads to see solutions from a different view.

    Session Takeaways

    • Gain a better understanding of what critical thinking is, why it is important in the world of User Experience Design
    • Identify ways to evaluate the visual and verbal messages in your work
    • Spot artificial constraints to focus on the root problem(s).
    • View problems from a different perspective and remove yourself as a consumer/user.
    • Learn how reframing problems can lead to radically different solutions.
    • Dissect problems to uncover solutions you may have previously overlooked.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Design Intersection - Cultural Sustainability, Activism, Social Entrepreneurship

    by Peter Hall and Beth Ferguson

    Our focus is the designers’ role in combining cultural sustainability and social entrepreneurship to find creative solutions to some of the world’s toughest problems. Innovative strategies, systems thinking, distributed production, open design and creative risk-taking are yielding meaningful outcomes regarding climate protection, clean mobility, renewable energy, waste reduction, and social equality.

    Effective utilization of social media, web based maps and the internet have made much of the world dependent on mobile communication devices, which need a constant supply of power to keep roaming. Balancing their impact, new tools such as the Kill-a-watt, energy monitor mobile apps and solar charging stations visually link users with their home/work energy consumption. Others, such as Green Map, livingprinciples.org or Treehugger, put an environmental and social perspective on local resources and developments, motivating action that benefits the commons.

    Designers and social entrepreneurs are forming strong communities of practice and collective identity as desire shifts toward sufficiency and well-being. Entities willing to take a creative risk and a leadership role in adopting holistic design processes are becoming the leaders of our future development. Providing tools for educators to restructure the pedagogy is essential for preparing future creators to face the challenges with sanguine, innovative solutions. Join with us on a journey towards redesigning design.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Room 8A, Austin Convention Center

  • My Title Is Web Designer, Now What?

    by Val Head and Chris Cashdollar

    As agencies and professionals become more entrenched in their processes for creating sites, the role of the web designer has become more nuanced. The skillsets of people who call themselves web designers can vary greatly from one to the next. One may never touch code; one may have their hands in every step of building out their designs; others may be somewhere in between.

    These days it's hard to know what kind of things you should be expected to do as a web designer. Should we continue to add skills outside of the traditional realm of design to our toolbox? Do we focus on becoming design experts? The way we answer questions will affect our careers and how we work.

    In this panel we will discuss what we, as web designers, need to do to adapt to the new trends and ever-changing demands of our craft. We'll talk about what skills a web designer should have in their design toolbox and tackle questions like: should designers know how to code? Where do the skills of a graphic designer and a web designer overlap and where do they differ? And how does the differentiation of role expectations effect design processes?

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Rio Grande A, Marriott Courtyard Austin Downtown/Convention Center

    Coverage transcript

  • Designing for Mobile Web

    by James Pearce

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 4:00pm to 4:15pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom E, Austin Convention Center

  • Anatomy of a Design Decision

    by Jared Spool

    What separates a good design from a bad design are the decisions that the designer made. Jared will explore the five styles of design decisions, showing you when gut instinct produces the right results and when designers need to look to more user-focused research. You'll see how informed decisions play out against rule-based techniques, such as guidelines and templates. And Jared will show you the latest research showing how to hire great decision makers and find opportunities that match your style.

    Of course, Jared will use his unforgettable presentation style to deliver an extremely entertaining and informative presentation.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

  • New Media vs Print Media, Who's Launching Today's Designer

    by Tina Shoulders

    Exploring traditional media vs new media when it comes to launching the career of a designer. Fashion designers and product designers have the ability to be small time rocks stars and household names once their name hits print, so we explore which mode of print media is doing it faster and more effectively. If your name is passed around the web often enough it moves faster from country to country but does that beat being in the style section of a national acclaimed magazine like Vogue? Do people respect tangible media more than they do new media. We will weight the pros and cons of pitching both new media (blogs) and print media all the while arguing that any press is good press.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Hill Country AB, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Designing for iPhone

    by whurley (william hurley)

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 5:45pm to 6:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom E, Austin Convention Center