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Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 of type Solo on Saturday 12th March

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  • Diversity in the Digital Age

    by Anne Hunter

    With the plethora of niche sites it’s hard to deny that the Internet has increased the amount of social, political and personal groups one can join. But is this cross sharing really creating diversity?

    In this session, Anne Hunter, VP, Advertising Effectiveness, comScore, will provide a comprehensive understanding of how the digital age has affected diversity. Does the democratic nature of the internet with its open sharing of ideas and cultures lead to a natural increase in diversity or are we seeing an end of true niche and specialty groups? Is over-diversification leading to a weakening of subcultures?

    With your grandmother being able to join your band’s fan page how has the demographic makeup shifted? This session will highlight the key differences between visitors. Through understanding key metrics comScore will examine whether or not this democratization has actually created a more diverse audience or simply created a group of samplers versus key users.

    Anne will examine how the digital age has affected demographics differently. For younger generations that have only existed within this schism, how is their idea of diversity different from older audiences? Does a generation, who is more prone to buy a single than an album, less likely to be deeply connected to one group?

    Finally, this session will also examine how diversity changes based on the medium. For example, how does the audience of BET Television compare to their online component?

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

  • How Print Design is the Future of Interaction

    by Mike Kruzeniski

    This session is about how the history of Print Design is becoming an important influence in the evolution of Interaction Design. As a craft, design for printed media has a rich history. Several generations of designers have pushed its boundaries in countless directions. It has been shaped over several hundred years as both a functional and aesthetic discipline, with a deep foundation of principles, practices, theories, and professional dialogue. In comparison, Interaction and UI Design is still a relatively young field. Its history has largely been driven by technology and functional goals. The dialogue around it has been centered on usability, which has been its purpose in the context of technological advancement. The visual language of UI has evolved from that standpoint: that it should evoke the familiar, analog experience of tools, buttons, knobs, and dials. That foundation has led to a very specific visual language in interactive experiences. In the past ten years however, the relevant technologies that support the design of Interfaces - displays, processing speeds, and rendering engines - have matured to a point that they provide a more capable canvas for design. Meanwhile, our culture has become visibly more comfortable with the technologies that surround it. These combination of trends are creating an important inflection point for designers. The aesthetic experience of the digital surface can now be considered and explored in a more sophisticated manner.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • How Progress Bars Change the Way We Live

    by Evan Jones

    Once upon a time slow connections begat the Progress Bar - bloated sites would taunt us with '15% loaded' screens. High-speed promised to kill the beast and free us from their tyranny but yet it lives! Progress bars are being used MORE lately to direct user actions. Look to Farmville and LinkedIn which push their users to collect 100% of their personal information. Incomplete progress bars are an itch that needs to be scratched. They carry the implicit language that declares 'You are here' but more importantly 'The end is in sight'. Game design motivates us through incremental, measurable progress towards a tangible goal but is this the way real life works? Is the progress bar's ubiquity in technology starting to affect the way we measure progress in meatspace? This panel will reach far across time and space to look at the story of progress bars, why they hypnotize us and what we need to do - slay the beast once and for all, or throw ourselves into its partially-complete embrace...

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • iPad Design Headaches (Take 2 Tablets, Call Me in the Morning)

    by Josh Clark

    The iPad and its entourage of Android tablets have introduced a new style of computing, confronting designers with unfamiliar aches and pains. Learn the symptoms (and fixes) for a range of new-to-the-world iPad interface ailments, including Greedy Pixel Syndrome, the dreaded Frankeninterface, and the "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" bait and switch. Explore practical techniques and eye-opening gotchas of tablet interface design, all grounded in the ergonomics, context, psychology, and nascent culture of these new devices (both iOS and Android). The presentation inoculates you against common problems with close-up looks at successful iPad apps from early sketches to final design. Genial bedside manner is administered by Josh Clark, author of the O'Reilly books "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps" and "Best iPhone Apps: A Guide for Discriminating Downloaders."

    LEVEL: Advanced

  • It's About Time: Visualizing Temporality

    by Joanna Wiebe

    Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana. I agree about the banana, but I'm not so sure about the arrow. What is the shape of time? Our online calendars, clocks and other models of time often are designed with the understanding that time is a forward-moving arrow. This sounds logical to the Western, English-speaking scientific mind. However, not everyone conceptualizes time as a relentless hurtling forward. Some cultures understand time as a fractal, a spiral, a mandala, a cycle. And a child, playing with the same toy over and over again, lives in a single seamless moment from dawn to dusk. Visualizing temporality is a fundamental issue in interaction design today. For example, we are looking at a future where our work must be useful for both Eastern and Western audiences, who differ in time-oriented cultural traits such as long-term vs. short-term orientation. We also need to be able to provide tools to differentiate the personal, bodily-felt experience of time from clock time. We may want to expand our customers' perception of time, to invite them to stay in the Deep Present. Our beliefs about time and its passage profoundly affect the design of software and interactive media. It's time for interaction designers to understand deeply how our customers know time, whether as an arrow, a spiral or a squiggle. How people slice and dice nature into concepts is fundamental to designing tools people can use to successfully live on the earth, for a long time.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

  • Know Your Investors: Fundraising Isn't Just About Money

    by Justin Fishner-Wolfson

    In the current environment, the way to raise capital has changed with greater numbers of angel investors and more competition among venture capitalists. Today, entrepreneurs are faced with more and more options, which means more decisions. Taking money is like getting married; your investors are your partners. Pick investors as carefully as you would a co-founder. Entrepreneurs should do diligence on their investors and find out if they will be there when times are tough. Understand how to differentiate between investors and determine the right number of investors for your seed round. Learn the difference between angels, super angels and venture capitalists. Ensure that your investor's incentives are aligned with yours so that they help make your company the next big thing. Understand the market and what is a “good” valuation and what are “standard” terms. Figure out how to create a syndicate that positions your company to succeed. Come armed with your questions on anything from basic investment and venture capital terminology to decisions you’re trying to make to help your company grow.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom E, Austin Convention Center

  • Saturday Yoga

    by Ari Stiles

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Room 8A, Austin Convention Center

  • So Long, and Thanks for All the Babelfish

    by Tim Holden

    Will 2011 be the year of the Universal Translator? As this science fiction dream teeters over the horizon, what can and should we do now to prepare for a time when the translation robot, not the search engine, becomes the single most important audience for your site? Will SEO give way to TEO? Does language need its own subtext markup? And when on Earth is Microsoft Word going to replace its 'Bold' button with a 'Strong' one? Lay aside your Google Goggles and iLingual apps (just for 60 minutes or so), and enjoy a session that's packed full of accessible translation theory, insight into the working processes of web copywriters, and more than the occasional riff on Douglas Adams.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Social Media Mythbusters

    by Peter Kim

    The early days of social media were filled with hope - and even more hype. Social media gurus and experts started popping up everywhere, offering brands assistance based on shaky credentials. Catchphrases became commonplace: customers are in control! Focus on people, not technology! Listen first! You don't need a Facebook strategy!

    Without a doubt, social "stuff" has the potential to change the way businesses engage with consumers, employees work together, and consumers communicate with each other. However, businesses that focus on the learnings of early social media will find themselves no better off than the early pioneers who found themselves with figurative consumer arrows in their backs.

    This session will focus on what worked early on, why it doesn't work now, and what companies need to be thinking about now in order to create and capture value from social business.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In TX Ballroom 5-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Social Media: The Next Generation of Business Engagement

    by Dave Evans and Jake McKee

    **This is a book reading**
    In 2009 I presented my first book, "Social Media Marketing: An Hour a Day." It was very well received (full room, Barnes & Noble sold out while I was speaking.) I've just released my second book, which covers social technology and collaboration at deeper levels in business. I'd love to present this on the Author's Stage at SXSW 2011.

    See more about the new book here:
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obido...

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In TX Ballroom 1, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • The Future of Innovation in Banking

    by Antonio F. Benjamin

    In an era of rapid internet development and innovation, banks have been described as technology laggards. This session will explore the future of innovation in banking and the payments industry. There are literally hundreds of large companies and startups in the payment space from Paypal to 1-person startups. The talk will also dive into “new currencies” and payments are emerging such as Facebook credits and other “alternative currencies”. Is there a future for the banking industry or are banks in danger of becoming relics. The session is not about Citigroup nor its business.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Grand Ballroom, AT&T Conference Center

  • The Lean Startup: 10 Reasons Most Startups FAIL

    by Parker Thompson , Pascal-Louis Perez, Eric Ries and Ash Maurya

    Eric Ries (Co-founder of IMVU / Author & Founder of “The Lean Startup”) is sought after worldwide for the methodology he advocates for both startups and large companies. In this session, Eric explains why most startups fail, how The Lean Startup has revolutionized entrepreneurship, and what you can do TODAY to improve your odds of building a game-changing product. Then you’ll hear case studies on Lean Building from folks who’ve iterated the hell out of their products…and won.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Room 204, AT&T Conference Center

  • Tools and Processes for ADD Project Managers/Entrepreneurs

    by Jason Ford

    Ever since grade school I've been told organization is my number one problem. Like most people involved in the web, I'm creative, technically proficient, and often lacking in focus. I've had to balance managing my personal disfunction with managing huge web projects and now running a startup business (FeedMagnet). More than once I've been introduced with the disclaimer, “Jason is really smart and talented...but he's kind of all over the place.”

    Nevertheless, I've determined to master my disfunction—and I've tried everything. Inbox Zero. GTD. Scrum and Agile. Countless systems involving whiteboards. Moleskines and the Hipster PDA. CRMs, RTM, and other TLAs. I won't claim I've found the holy grail of organization but I've made a lot of progress—and life and business are much more manageable now.

    This session is not for beginners. I'm going to assume you've already tried, or at least heard of, most of the popular project management and personal organization techniques out there. This session is for folks who have been fighting the same fight as me and are looking to learn from my mistakes and successes.

    Specific topics to cover: Why systems work (or don't) for individuals. How to map your individual profile of disfunction. Putting custom-tailored systems in place to meet your specific needs.

    If you have enough focus to have read this far, this session may not be for you—or maybe you are just desperate to figure this out and the session will be perfect.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon D, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • A Bootstrapped Geek Sifts Through the Bullshit

    by Jason Cohen

    After starting three companies, I've found that some widely accepted advice lead me to failure while trusting my (inexperienced) gut lead to success. So many business philosophies profess they're the One True Way, yet different business face different hurdles. With stories, six actionable lessons, and a workshopping of 37signals' philosophy, you'll learn when to follow the rules and when to go your own way.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon AB, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Intrigue Me: Writing Compelling, Credible Content

    by Stephanie Hay

    Although the web as a medium - and the web industry in general - promotes a somewhat informal community culture, its standards are absolute. Competition continues to evolve our definition of "exceptional" in order to efficiently separate the pioneers from the posers.

    But when it comes to content, are the boundaries still too informal? Have we been so focused on conceiving, designing, developing, and marketing the most mind-blowing ideas that we're apathetic to (correctly) adding a space between "log" and "in".

    I say, no way Jose (The question is, do you? And who is Jose, anyway?)

    Since designers and developers have been busy creating intensely standards-based work, it's understandable that they haven't necessarily kept sharp on their written word. But without the universal nature of black-and-white text to complement an online portfolio or describe a unique application, a reader is left alone to categorize, digest, and decide: am I intrigued enough to *do* something?

    In this session, I'll discuss ways in which web specialists can write compelling, credible content that piques interest and encourages action from readers. Attendees will leave with tips to elevate their content game -- whether they're aiming to more successfully write dynamic resumes and cover letters, describe their work in creative portfolios, guide users through enjoyable web interfaces, or convey value to gain one more paying subscriber.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Let's Hook Up: Brands, Celebs, and Non-profits

    by Katie VanLangen, Chris Brewer and Paul Rieckhoff

    Ever wonder how your favorite celebrity became a spokesperson for a national brand? Why your beer of choice is supporting veterans? How your home team chooses the charities that they support? It takes more than a one-night-stand to make these relationships worthwhile. It takes dates, flirting, compromise and commitment. Most importantly, it takes shared goals and vision.

    We'll show you how Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), a national non-profit, non-partisan group supporting our nation's newest generation of veterans has established a multi-year partnership with Miller High Life, the San Diego Padres, and celebrities that support their mission. Together, they are literally changing lives through a program that will give up to $1 million in experiences to veterans.

    In a world where everyone is online and new technology, websites and companies are cropping up everyday, brand loyalty is difficult to maintain. It is critical for brands to ally with the organizations and people that support their ideals, and give their audiences a reason to believe their messaging.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

  • Social Shopping: The Future of Selling Stuff Online

    by Willo O'Brien

    Markets are conversations. As the web continues its neverending voyage toward Social, indie merchants must learn to engage and interact with their existing and future customers in new ways. The era of Social Shopping has begun, so get the info you need to stay ahead of the curve. Learn how to take advantage of the social web to help your indie business make more sales, connect with your community, and build devoted followers around the world. Perfect for small business owners, artists, crafters, musicians, authors and anyone else with something to sell.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Using Twitter to Improve College Student Engagement

    by Rey Junco

    While faculty and staff at higher education institutions have experimented with the use of social media, there has not been a concerted effort to integrate these technologies in educationally-relevant ways. Emerging research in the field of social media, student engagement, and success shows that there are specific ways that these technologies can be used to improve educational outcomes. This presentation will focus on reviewing and translating research on the effects of Twitter on college students into effective and engaging educational practices. Background research on the psychological construct of engagement will be provided and will be linked to engagement in online social spaces.

    In addition to presenting cutting-edge research on how to create engaging and engaged communities, the presenter will review specific ways that Twitter can be used in the classroom and the co-curriculum. The presenter will discuss how academicians can hack existing technologies, specifically Twitter, for educational good and will present the results of his latest research on the effects of Twitter on student engagement and grades.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Hill Country AB, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • What Comic Books Can Teach Mobile Application Designers

    by Anjuan Simmons

    Mobile application design is a conversation that allows the developer to speak to the user. While manuals are able to guide this conversation, nothing is more immediate and enduring than the user interface of the application itself. The small size of mobile device screens requires developers to create user interfaces that communicate to users in ways that are concise yet easy to understand.

    The comic book medium offers many design standards that mobile application developers can use to improve the effectiveness of their graphical user interface designs. Comic books have evolved through the years to maximize their ability to tell a story while confined to two dimensional static images. Comic book legend Will Eisner published “Comics and Sequential Art” in 1985 in order to document his mastery of using graphics to tell a story. This presentation will explore the design principles Eisner shared in his landmark book and specifically apply them to mobile application design. Scott McCloud’s book “Understanding Comics”, which built on top of the foundation laid by Eisner, will also be covered as well as McCloud’s later work “Reinventing Comics”.

    Film makers have used comic books as the blueprint for blockbuster movies like “Spider Man” and “Batman Returns”. The comic book medium can provide a blueprint for blockbuster mobile applications as well. When attendees leave this session, they will know how to throw some Eisner onto their mobile application designs!

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Why Mexico Will Change Your LIfe

    by Gary Hoover

    Most Americans are not aware of the impact that the future of Mexico will have on the future of the United States. We too often perceive it as only a beach destination, and a dangerous, scary one at that. Much the same can be said about the rest of Latin America. Understanding Mexico is the gateway to understanding the balance of the Western Hemisphere. Political and economic journalists are absorbed with China, India, Afghanistan, and Iraq. But over the next 50-100 years, the people and businesses of the United States will be as affected by what happens in Mexico and Latin America as they will be by events on the other side of the globe. Likely more affected. The immigration debates on cable news are symptomatic, failing to probe political, cultural, and demographic realities. Latin America’s 900+ million people may have a very exciting future. How that future unfolds is at least in part up to us “Norte” Americans. In order to achieve the most prosperous and peaceful possible shared future, we need a deeper understanding of the people, culture, and geography of Mexico and Latin America. In my fast-paced presentation, I will hit upon key Mexican and Latin data and trends which will likely shape the future of the United States, focusing on Mexico as a first step in understanding. I will allow 15 minutes for questions and answers.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Rio, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

  • Your Mom Has an iPad: Designing for Boomers

    by John McRee

    It’s a cultural phenomenon that most of us didn’t see coming: baby boomers are taking over Facebook, while the millenials are abandoning it like crazy because it is so last year. After all, what 20-something wants his mom to see his status update about last night’s party?

    This example signifies a trend in technology overall: the assumed late adopters are now joining early adopters as technology becomes increasingly easy and fun to use.  Devices such as the Wii and the iPad have overwhelmingly been adopted by the older and less technologically savvy crowd.

    The trend has significant design implications. As we’re designing for emergent devices, we need to be very aware that we’re definitely not designing for ourselves. User research will become even more critical, with particular attention paid to the more mature crowd as they have different needs from other generations. Security, privacy and ease of use are key attributes for this audience that we may have overlooked, thinking we were designing for younger users.

    During this session, John will discuss specific case studies of companies that saw the benefits of conducting the necessary user research to understand the needs, goals and motivations of the boomer crowd as well as specific design techniques that appeal to a more mature audience. In addition, he’ll also explore whether there is one, common design language that speaks to the needs of multiple generations.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Are Your Customers a Crowd or a Community?

    by Thomas Knoll

    The word "community" is becoming so overused that it is beginning to lose its meaning. Many businesses apply that word to their customers without understanding the value of true community.

    But you are different. You understand there is a difference between fans and family. Let's get our hands dirty, explore these differences, and discover together how much potential there is in converting our customers from a crowd to a community.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In TX Ballroom 1, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • AVAdventure: Digital, Handheld, User-defined Storytelling in Action

    by Adam Stackhouse

    In its purest form, the AVAdventure would utilize no room, no moderator, no panelists, and hundreds of participants.

    Originating from the "Audio Adventure" series of 1693 Productions in Williamsburg, VA, this unique, one-time storytelling experience - specially designed for the participants of SXSW 2011 - will use mobile video devices to take attendees on an interactive journey wherein they define their own narrative. The day of the event, users are sent a link to a hosted video file, instructed to download, and at a predetermined time, press play. As the story begins, users are given instructions, choices, and are introduced to characters creating a experience that is part movie, part concert, and part interactive fiction. The resulting sensation - caught within personal headphones - is compellingly solo and communal simultaneously, and in its miss-it-and-it's-gone temporary existence, distinctly uniting for the participants.

    Here we propose to bring the series - in the Audio/Video format - to SXSW 2011 as a custom-designed experience for attendees unfamiliar with this unique storytelling format. Ideally participants would begin in a starting location of their choice - inside or within brief walking distance of the main event venue. The use of facilities - rooms, projectors, unique areas - could be incorporated as allowed, and if possible, musicians participating in SXSW would be contacted to integrate their work in the custom narrative as well.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

  • Chicken or the Egg? What Search Activity Conveys

    by Vera H-C Chan

    When people have questions they turn to search engines for the answers. Search activity can tell some interesting trends – hottest new gadget, most popular travel destination, or whether it’s going to be a bad flu season.

    By digging deeper, this activity can be used in more compelling ways. For instance, it can be interpreted to foresee trends and develop news stories as billions of searches lend themselves to many narratives. Figuring out the “what-does-it-all-mean” goes beyond declaring the winner in an ever-changing popularity contest, or what’s on top of everyone’s mind day to day. What does the rise in apocalypse-related searches following natural disasters say about our modern society? Are the lookups following Tiger Woods’ story prurient, or are we repeating our ancient fascination with the morality tale? And can search activity project what the masses will decide, even before the masses know themselves?

    By analyzing what people are searching for, societal trends can be determined and some would go as far as to say that search trends can actually predict the future. Analyzing search trends helps us understand the impulses and processes of why people make their choices at that particular moment in time.

    This session will discuss the predictive nature of search and whether search has the power to drive news.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Dear Miss Manners: WTF with the Social Web?

    by Deborah Schultz

    The social web is now a teenager –awkward, arrogant, snarky, fearless, experimental and open. She is shaking things up and having a major impact on our culture, social dynamics and etiquette. What are the new social dynamics and cultural impacts of all these tools and technologies?

    This session will explore the emerging etiquette issues of our participatory hyper-connected world. What are the new rules? How are our relationships, culture and business assumptions changing? Do we understand the impact of this new relationship persistance?

    - Do I have to ask before I post a photo of a friend online? Who has editorial approval?

    - Am I required to respond to every inbound communication I receive or is “ignoring” an accepted response?

    - Where is the line between encouraging participation and being just plain annoying?

    - What are you doing mucking up my activity stream?

    - What the heck is a “friend” anyway?

    How do we design, build and manage these new spaces? What are the new rules of the online commons and the associated appropriate etiquette? This participatory session will ask attendees to contribute their own real world examples and will lay out a new framework for a new social contract. It’s our job to decide what we want our web teenager to be when she is all grown-up.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Internet Crisis Communications in Latin America

    by Oscar Rojas

    This session will be presented in SPANISH. Esta sesión será presentada en ESPAÑOL – Crisis de Comunicación en Internet en Latinoamérica. SXSW Latin America programming hashtag: #sxswLatAm
    The Internet is a great place for people to exchange opinions and complain about the things they don’t like. Enterprises, brands and famous people are continuously exposed to consumer anger. This can sometimes escalate into a crisis for corporate as well as personal brands.
    In this session I’ll try to define and explain what an online communication crisis is and what isn’t. I’ll provide examples of crises, including the most extreme cases, what to do after a crisis and suggestions for proactive actions to protect brands, companies, personal reputations, and how to facilitate conversations with people and consumers in case a crisis arises. My presentation is focused on Latin American companies and audiences, and explain the cultural differences in crisis communications between the U.S. and Latin American countries.
    - If you like our proposal and vote for it, please tell your friends on Twitter!
    I just voted for Crisis Communications On The Internet in Latin America at http://PanelPicker.sxsw.com You can vote for #sxswLatAm programming too!
    - Si te gusta nuestra propuesta y votarás por ella, ¡por favor dile a tus amigos en Twitter!
    Ya voté por Crisis Communications On The Internet in Latin America en http://PanelPicker.sxsw.com ¡Tú puedes votar para programación de #sxswLatAm también!

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Rio, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

  • Mistakes I Made Building Netflix for the iPhone

    by Kent Brewster

    A funny thing happened last spring: Netflix let me build the front end for their iPhone product. Yeah. Me. The punk-rock-API guy.

    The initial conversation went something like this:

    Netflix: "It's five weeks to WWDC. We've got Mobile Safari, our open APIs, it's dark, and we're wearing sunglasses."

    Me: "Hit it."

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Ordering Disorder: Grid Design for the New World

    by Khoi Vinh

    Everyone's using grids, and grid tools and frameworks are everywhere. But do you truly understand the ins and outs of this powerful design principle, and how it's changing along with new media and platforms? Chances are most digital designers have only a cursory knowledge of the grid's concepts and best practices, overlooking the tremendous value that truly smart grid usage brings.

    In this expansive sequel to his famous 2006 SXSWi talk "Grids Are Good," designer and grid expert Khoi Vinh (NYTimes.com, Subtraction.com) will give a bracing tour of the many ideas packed into his forthcoming book "Ordering Disorder: Grid Principles for Web Design." This solo talk will span the history of grids, take a brass-tacks tour of best practices, and look ahead at some of the most enlightening and innovative thinking that's shaping grid thinking in the future.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • Social Media and the NBA: Where It's @

    by Tariq Ahmad

    Research on the NBA is vast. Research on social media is growing. But research on the intersection of the NBA and social media is very limited. I conducted research on how NBA fans use social media (specifically Facebook and Twitter) to support their favorite NBA teams, and results will be discussed. This presentation will also show how social media is changing the way NBA fans connect and keep up with their favorite teams, how teams are reaching out to fans, and how teams can improve their social media presence. Examples of how teams are using social media to connect with fans, as well as suggestions on how teams of all sports and sports leagues can make better use of social media to engage their fans will also be discussed.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In TX Ballroom 5-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • The 90 Minute Solution: Live Like a Sprinter

    by Tony Schwartz

    Are you forever struggling to juggle more demands and get more done? That's not about to change any time soon. Demand is rising inexorably. Here's the problem: we're not meant to run like computers -- at high speeds, continuously, for long periods of time. Rather, human beings are designed to pulse rhythmically between spending energy and intermittently renewing it.

    The sad truth is that most of us don't do either one very well. We may dimly recognize that we're more efficient and effective when we focus on one thing at a time, but we still react, with Pavlovian predictability, to every new call on our attention.

    We know, too, that we work too many hours and sleep too few, but we underestimate the costs. In fact, sleep is more important than food, and our bodies crave renewal and recovery during the day every 90 minutes. Instead, we override these signals with caffeine, sugar and by fueling ourselves with our own stress hormones, diminishing our capacity and our productivity over time.

    Tony Schwartz, bestselling author of The Way We're Working Isn't Working, will lay out a step-by-step approach to a better way of working, grounded in multidisciplinary research and real-life stories from his work with organizations such as Google, Apple, the LAPD and Sony Pictures.

    Take one hour to immerse yourself in the new paradigm Tony lays out – including a series of strategies you can instantly apply -- and you’ll never work the same way again.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 12th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

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