Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 of type Panel on Sunday 13th March

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  • 15 Slides, Three Writers, Three Ways -- One Hour

    by Jim Coudal, John Gruber and rands

    In this presentation, you will see the same set of 15 slides -- three times. Three different writers will walk through the same set of slides and explain their approaches to getting started, editing ideas, figuring out how to get unstuck, and understanding when they're done. Part improv and part preparation, this presentation will give you three totally different and unexpected perspectives regarding the art of writing.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Beyond the Hype: Mobile App Opportunities In Africa

    by Justin Arenstein

    Africa's 1 billion people are the world's fastest growing market for mobile phones.

    Sales of mobile phones on the continent grew 22% year-on-year in 2009, and are projected to add another 280-million users by 2015. But Africans are not just users: they’re also pioneering ground-breaking new mobile services, leading the world in everything from mobile money to mobile health.

    The speed of growth has, however, created so much sensational hype that it is difficult to tell the real opportunities from misleading exaggeration.

    This panel will cut through the hype, to explore the real opportunities in Africa for mobile app developers: is it all low-tech, or are there markets for cutting edge apps? Where are the most sustainable markets, what kinds of apps / services are most likely to succeed, and which mobile platforms offer best scope for success?

    The panel will also examine the successes and failures of developers who have already taken the plunge, and will evaluate which African mobile developers are best placed for partnerships or other collaborations.

    And, because Africa is pioneering its own world-class mobile services in everything from augmented reality to geo-social and other location-based services, we will explore which of those mobile innovations are poised for global expansion.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon D, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Can The Internet Make Us Happy?

    by Kevin Hansen, Anastasia Goodstein, Dr. Pamela Rutledge, Catherina Rodrigues O'Gorman and Veer Gidwaney

    Can "tweeting" release Oxytocin? Does looking through your friends' Facebook photos or reading the newsfeed impact your mood? This panel will look at how the internet and social networking actually impacts how we feel and will explore opportunities for using technology to help people feel better. We'll discuss the current research as well as innovative sites, applications and other virtual interventions designed to improve our mental health with an emphasis on young people (16-24).

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In TX Ballroom 5-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Daily Deals: Where Ads Become Content

    by Aaron Batalion, Jonty Kelt, Tricia Han and Jim Moran

    Local deals, once relegated to the weekly circular, now drive the fastest growing sector in internet history. Groupon, LivingSocial, BuyWithMe and others created a billion dollar industry almost overnight. Local publishers have influenced our spending for years, but they are finding a powerful new monetization vehicle as offline commerce comes online. Hundreds of publishers have launched Daily Deal products in the last six months, and this is just the beginning.
    The founders of LivingSocial, DailyCandy Deals, Group Commerce and Yipit will discuss the future of the Daily Deal space and how local media companies, apps and directories are adapting to it.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Ballroom F, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Data-Driven Government: Improving the Citizen Experience [Cancelled]

    by Julie Germany, Aneesh Chopra and Matt Lira

    Over the past several years, there have been many discussions regarding how interactive technology can drive change in our nation’s politics – but of perhaps greater importance is how technology can improve the daily functioning of our nation’s government.

    The discussion should not be a partisan one – this panel will bring together leading innovators from both parties to engage in a post-partisan discussion about how technology can improve the public’s interactions with their government.

    This discussion should be about specifics – we can all agree on the broad principles that technology drives change – but we have all heard that conversation before. This panel will focus on the specific progress that has been made, the specific opportunities that exist in the near future, and the specific challenges that need to be addressed.

    As citizens increasingly become on-demand consumers in their daily lives, it is clear that government needs to better utilize interactive technology or it will only be more radically disconnected from the public.

    This is not a political conference, which is precisely why it should be where this conversation takes place – how can the innovations from the creative, marketing and interactive communities be applied to improving our nation?

    Our government needs to modernize. We need to move forward and debate new ideas, focusing on how we can collectively make our government work smarter, faster and better for all citizens.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

  • Decision Trees: YouTube's New Breed of Interactive Storytellers

    by Tony E. Valenzuela, Marc Hustvedt and Rafi Fine

    YouTube's annotations tool opened up a whole new way telling stories, with the rise of interactive videos that let viewers "choose-their-own-adventure" as they navigate through the story. This panel bring together the best and most creative of YouTube's new breed of interactive storytellers to share their secrets of how they pull off these complex creations—including a walkthrough of actual viewer decision trees from their projects.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Room 18ABCD, Austin Convention Center

  • Making Money with WordPress (Without Working at Automattic)

    by Alex King, Brandon Jones, Shane Pearlman and Sonia Simone

    WordPress is free! It does astounding things out of the box. But it doesn't do everything. Therein lies the opportunity. Tons of people are making serious money with WordPress, why aren't you? In this session, each panelist will cover a core business opportunity with WordPress: Customization Services, Design Products & Premium Themes, Premium Plugins, Hosting Services and Content Properties. I'll share how Peter & I grossed close to a million in revenue last year from WordPress related design and development services with the help of a small team of talented freelancers. We'll explore the approach that Brandon, the #1 premium theme seller in North America, used to gross $250k in the last year (not bad for one dude). There are no shortages of opportunity. Get insight into how you can be successful from someone in each of these categories who is killing it and making real money (without working for Automattic).

    1. How do I make my WordPress theme or plugin product stand out in an app marketplace?
    2. How do I land 100k+ WordPress design + development projects?
    3. How do I make money from WordPress support without hating everyone I talk to?
    4. Where does the real revenue in blogs actually come from?
    5. What makes someone pay for something thats free?

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Measuring Social Media – Let’s Get Serious

    by Jason Falls, Christina Warren, Raj Kadam and Kevin Weil

    If you’re in charge of social media for your company, you’re likely struggling to show the executives what exactly all that hard work does for the business. You know it’s worthwhile, and you know there’s ROI, but you don’t have the tools or the resources to scientifically measure exactly what it all means. In fact – it’s probably getting to the point where you’re fed up.

    This panel will gather experts from the social media monitoring and analytics world to share insights into the best ways to measure your social media campaigns without having to go to the ends of the earth to do it. What should you be paying attention to? What doesn’t really matter? How can you make measurement less of a burden and more of a strategic advantage?

    Panelists will share real-world examples of how you can start measuring with accuracy and ease without losing any more sleep.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In TX Ballroom 2-4, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • My Prototype Beat Up Your Business Plan

    by Kristian Andersen, Jeffrey Kalmikoff, Kendra Shimmell and Ade Olonoh

    The business plan, as a tool to lure potential investors, secure early customers, and guide the direction of your business, is a dying construct. Smart entrepreneurs realize that a prototype is worth a thousand business plans. This panel will focus on prototypes as a tool to accelerate the success of your business, and will have a particular emphasis on the role of prototyping in business modeling, fund raising, product development, and sales. We'll talk specifically about how prototyping can allow you to more efficiently allocate resources (both talent, time and money), discover customers’ unmet needs, outsmart the competition, and move potential investors from interested to infatuated.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon AB, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

  • Patients/Caregivers on Facebook: Establishing Boundaries Without Barriers

    by Ed Bennett, Daniel Goldman, Keely Kolmes, Jennifer Shine Dyer and Dana Lewis

    Social media platforms create new challenges for healthcare practitioners and other professionals who actively participate in online communities that have emerged on Facebook, Twitter and similar applications. While it's not unusual for those with chronic health issues and long term medical problems to build close relationships with care providers "in real life" - legal, ethical and practical issues emerge when patients/clients seek to add care providers to online networks.

    How, for example, should a pediatric nurse respond when a cancer patient's mom wants to become a Facebook "friend"? What parameters must be established now that these public conversations could become of an official medical record? What else is preventing medical staff and healthcare organizations from adopting social media?

    Engage with panelists - patients and healthcare workers - who actively use social media and are articulate advocates for its benefits in the complex world of healthcare delivery. Panelists for this session have developed ways to establish appropriate boundaries without creating barriers to health education and empowerment.

    Attendees will develop a more sophisticated awareness of privacy and engagement within online communities. They'll learn how those in the healthcare community have dealt with significant concerns and developed effective ways to resolve ethical conflicts, and will leave the session with a framework for addressing similar concerns within their own networks.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Sabine, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

  • Social Media Is Science Fiction

    by Matt Thompson, Charlie Jane Anders, Maureen McHugh, Molly Crabapple and Annalee Newitz

    What do science fiction stories tell us about how social networking and user-generated content will evolve? How it will affect us as a civilization? Futurists and SF writers will explore real possibilities for the next fifty years of social media - and debunk bad futurism that predicts either total abundance or complete apocalypse.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In TX Ballroom 1, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • The User Generated Revolution, Social Media Overcoming Censorship

    by Julian Siddle

    In 2009 the Iranian government expelled most foreign media organisations and jammed international broadcasts. For the BBC's Persian TV emails, video, Twitter and facebook postings from Iran became the main source of news. Groundbreaking stories were complied using material from viewers and listeners - often sent in with great personal risk to themselves.

    The current protests in Egypt, seem to have begun on Facebook. In the Xingjian province of China government censors were defeated by a tweet - news of a popular uprising amongst the regions Uighurs in this remote province leaked out to the world's media. A military clampdown ensued, but not before foreign media got to the region and heard the Uighurs grievances. Conversely the oppressors use the same social media tools, partly to spread disinformation about their activities, but also in the cases of groups such as the Taliban, to push their beliefs.

    The panel will discuss how censorship and suppression is made more and more difficult to hide by the social media revolution, and the impact of this for traditional media organisations.

    Julian Siddle the inventor of the BBC's technology programme Digital Planet leads the panel with journalists from the BBC Chinese and Persian services who were actively involved in these stories. Examples of UGC - user generated content; videos produced by the public in places with repressive regimes, will be shown during the panel.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Hill Country AB, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage sketch note

  • Too Small, Too Open: Correcting Wikipedia's Local Failure

    by Phoebe Ayers, Michael Trice, Philip Neustrom and Deepina Kapila

    What happens when Wikipedia isn't big enough? This is a key question for those developing closed community spaces. Wikipedia came onto the scene promising to offer a repository for all knowledge, but it turned into the world’s best encyclopaedia—absolutely nothing more, nothing less. A remarkable achievement it is, but one that never managed to store local knowledge with the same reverence as general, global knowledge. This panel will explore how developers are trying to address these limitations by building a different kind of collaborative environment. From local wikis that only allow those who live in the community to contribute to government-sponsored social networks meant to enhance a specific organization, the panel examines the viability of closed and semi-open networks. The panel will specifically look at how you get local communities involved in mass collaboration: 1) What topics generate traffic for local communities? 2) Which current collaborative tools work best for community engagement? 3) What kind of collaborative tools are needed for the future? 4) How do local collaborative environments reach out to community members who lack digital literacy? To answer these questions on local collaboration the panel will involve experts involved with DavisWiki.org and the Department of State, as well as those involved in digital inclusion efforts in underprivileged communities.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

  • A Media-Based Economy for Detroit's Future

    by Benjamin Chodoroff, Diana J Nucera, Adriel Thornton, Mike Medow and Ilana Invincible

    Detroit is what the rest of the world has to look forward to. This panel will explain why there's hope in that statement, when you consider the growing community of citizen journalists, culture producers, technologists and small-business owners who are building a media-based economy at the city's grassroots. Neighborhoods are building mesh wireless networks to expand Internet access through community-owned infrastructure. Hackers teach residents how to build computers from salvaged parts and run them with open source software. Musicians use online distribution to reach global audiences, and party promoters give young people a reason to stay in Detroit. Detroit's emerging media economy is nurtured by its legacy of independent music and culture; by the culture of engineering, building and fixing instilled by our experience with the auto industry; and by the creativity and cooperation that comes out of necessity. For the past four years, the annual Allied Media Conference has helped foster Detroit's media economy, convening thousands of media-makers, activists, artists and technologists in Detroit every summer for a weekend of skill-sharing and strategizing. This panel will offer insights from AMC organizers, and other leading innovators in Detroit's creative culture of art and technology. We invite discussion about what the rest of the world can learn from Detroit and vice versa.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • E-Race: Avatars, Anonymity And The Virtualization Of Identity

    by Wagner James Au, Lisa Nakamura and Jeff Yang

    Back in 2003, photographer Robbie Cooper photographed dozens of portraits of online gameplayers alongside their avatars for a book called ALTER EGO. The book is an incredible illustration of the ways that digital platforms have transformed fixed physical characteristics into a virtual wardrobe that can be donned or dismissed with a few clicks of a button.

    This phenomenon might be trivial if online identity were all "just a game"—but the truth is, the line between online and offline identity has increasingly blurred. Writing about a study he conducted exploring gender identity among MMO participants, researcher Lukas Blinka wrote in the journal Cyberpsychology in 2008 that “the data...shows that younger players tend to identify with — i.e. not to distinguish from — their avatars, and the younger the respondents were, the stronger the phenomenon."

    What are the implications for traditional aspects of identity in a context where they can be so freely and fluidly altered? What does the ability to hide or disguise identity mean in particular for the experience of race — and racism — online? This panel will debate whether digital platforms can enhance racial engagement and understanding, or simply encourage conscienceless and consequence-free acts of hatred and abuse — and explore how online identity is forcing us to confront new ways of thinking about race, ethnicity and gender.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Hill Country AB, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage sketch note

  • Growing Global Movements: Technology and the New Arab Identity

    by Ayah Bdeir and Jon Phillips

    Over the last few months, the Arab world has once again resurfaced as a topic on the world's mind and at the forefront of media. This time however, not in relation to terrorism, but revolution; not violence, but democracy. A new arab identity is emerging... an arab that is literate, socially engaged, politically active, modern, moderate and digitally savvy.

    What is behind this new identity? How has the way arabs perceive themselves affected the way the world defines an arab and vice versa? What role has technology such as the web and social media played in this shift? How much can be attributed to deliberate efforts from within the arab world to redefine its identity through active movements in entrepreneurship, creative expression and science/technology literacy.

    This core conversation is timely with unresolved crises in Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain etc., but also Iran and Libya. Join us for a discussion led by developer and co-founder of Aiki Lab Cultural Center in Damascus, Jon Philips and Lebanese interactive artist and CC fellow Ayah Bdeir, accompanied by various invited arab entrepreneurs, artists, designers and cultural leaders.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Room 5ABC, Austin Convention Center

  • Hacking the News: Applying Computer Science to Journalism

    by Tristan Harris, Trei Brundrett, Jennifer 8. Lee, Upendra Shardanand and Burt Herman

    Reporters and editors work in ways that are still largely tied to old print and broadcast models. Applying lessons from computer science can help make journalism more scalable, flexible and personalized.

    This panel will discuss developments such as object-oriented programming, model-view controller frameworks, database-driven Web applications and social code repositories -- and explore how these principles can be applied to journalism and create the future of storytelling.

    For example, making stories in an object-oriented mindset can help journalists work more efficiently, reusing and building on past work. Stories can be created as structured data that can be mashed up and viewed in more flexible ways by readers. Readers can get personalized stories that highlight what's new to them -- rather than having to read through what they already know to glean the latest news.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Health Data Everywhere: Not a Drop to Link?

    by Roni Zeiger, Indu Subaiya, Gilles Frydman, Aman Bhandari and Jamie Heywood

    The Health 2.0 and Open Gov movements have helped unlock large repositories of data - from user-generated data in hundreds of online communities to mobile devices to federal quality indicators to medical record data within provider organizations. But much remains to be done to connect these disconnected islands of data to generate information that's meaningful and actionable by end users. And what happens when you link informed patient communities with their health data? As Clay Shirky says, it gets weird. And interesting.

    A number of communities have cropped up to promote access to medical data and the integration of user-reported and behavioral data within the clinical decision stream including healthdatarights.org, #healthapps, #health2dev, #73cents, #getupandmove and #WhyPM. With the opening up of health datasets, platform APIs and increasingly sophisticated analytic engines to make user-generated health data clinically relevant, we can finally unleash the wider developer community to build robust and integrated tools to improve health and healthcare.

    This session brings together some of the leading voices in the Health 2.0 movement to discuss and demo technologies that help access, mine, display and distribute control of health information across a wide variety of interfaces and devices. We will also hear how government is opening healthcare datasets for access by the developer community and how patients are increasingly becoming "n of 1" platforms.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Rio, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

  • Influencer Throwdown: Proving Influence Once and For All

    by David Binkowski, Kevin Dugan and Krista Neher

    Influence "experiments" like Fast Company's project do more harm then good when it comes to defining and measuring influence. It's more than how many people you can get to vote for you. Instead of counting the people who reach you need to reach the people who count. Four marketing veterans will weigh in with individual presentation on their real-world examples of influence and discuss the current state of influence. What's real, what's wrong and what's next.

    As part of the interactive discussion attendees will learn
    * different approaches to measuring influence
    * specific examples of influence including the impact it had for a brand
    * ways to identify and measure influence

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon D, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

  • Local Online Communities: Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

    by Ann Baldinucci, Joe Stump, Lane Becker and Micki Krimmel

    Americans are increasingly turning to high tech tools to recreate the small town experience. Join us for a discussion with pioneers of local tech to learn about how location-based technologies are connecting people to create the next generation economy and a more engaged citizenry. We’ll cover tools of the trade, best practices and give you tips on how you can infuse place into your project. Finally, we’ll envision what the ideal connected neighborhood might look like in the future.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Minority Report: Social Media for Decreasing Health Disparities

    by Maryland Grier, Aimee Roundtree, Wenying Sylvia Chou, Greg Beets and Jen McClure

    This presentation will highlight the Connecticut Health Foundation’s (CT Health) partnership approach to decreasing racial and ethnic health disparities through social media. CT Health’s social media goal is to build public will that will move people to act(ion) – and along the way – create a social movement to toward health justice. Cited as one of few foundations of this size that is investing in social media to create dialogue about health disparities beyond academic circles, CT Health has partnered with social media experts, public health professionals, and community advocates and influential leaders. Recognizing there is no clear blueprint for philanthropy using social media to do this work; CT Health will share its path to raising awareness about the consequences and implications of health disparities via social media.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Sabine, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

  • The Five Startups You Meet in the Deadpool

    by Ben Lerer, Emily Hickey, Charlie O'Donnell and Christine Herron

    Former entrepreneur, current investor and innovation community leader Charlie O'Donnell will discuss five different patterns of failure often seen in startups that don't make it. It will cover how entrepreneurs can derisk their ideas, maintain momentum, and take advantage of opportunities early on in a company's life cycle. Patterns of failure include: 1) Failure to zero in on a sector's most pressing pain point. 2) Not leaving enough time or financing to iterate on an idea. 3) Failure to create short term milestones that create value. 4) Failure to capture industry attention and mindshare. - 5) Failure to build a realistic customer acquisition engine.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon AB, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • The Future of Philanthropy: Social Giving Takes Off

    by Sarah Vela, Thon Morse, Dan Patterson, Naveed Lalani and Ehren Foss

    Recent research shows that online giving is growing at a rate of 40% annually. Driving and shaping this activity are some innovative tech startup companies looking to change the very nature of online giving. Using game mechanics, mobile technology, and principals of community management and engagement, these startups are giving younger adults more relevant ways to connect with, volunteer for and donate to nonprofits and causes that matter to them.

    Questions for this panel of industry representatives will include: What's the future for social giving startups? How are they tapping into existing online communities to encourage philanthropy? And what are the down sides to having so-called "middleware" sites and applications in the mix?

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Town Lake Ballroom, Radisson Hotel & Suites Austin-Town Lake

    Coverage audio clip

  • The New Work Style – How Work Is Evolving

    by Jon Ferrara, Sharon Feder, TA McCann, David Hauser and Adam Loving

    The American workforce – cubicles and water coolers may come to mind. But innovation in mobile and cloud has brought a new work style. We work smarter, more remotely and use apps to manage workflow. We’ve fundamentally changed the way we do business.

    This panel will discuss new tools and work thought-processes emerging today.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In TX Ballroom 1, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • The Politics Behind HTML5

    by Paul Cotton, John Foliot and Charles McCathieNevile

    Organizer: Charles McCathieNevile, Opera Software

    HTML5 is the flavor of the month. Steve Jobs thinks it will feed his cat, Google thinks it means whatever they think is good, and the rest of us are waiting to discover what (apart from video, better forms, and interoperable parsing on the web) it actually *is* when it's done. Obviously, there is a lot of interest in the next generation of such an important technology, and a lot of discussion about what it will be, how it works, etc. Where the people go, politics follows close behind. From CSSquirrel to MrLastWeek, from the New York Times to bloggers in Kyrgyzstan, people are also watching the politics. And there is a lot of it. On this panel, the people who have been there take you on a guided tour of the (smoky backroom) discussions and deals that shape HTML5, and looks at what is happening now. Where did HTML5 come from? Who were the players, who are the players, and what do they think? Why is X3D not in HTML5 if MathML is? What happened to accesskey, and why are people unhappy? Why does HTML5 have two licenses, and two specs? This panel *won't* answer your questions about how to include HTML5 in your website. It will explore the thorny questions you want to ask but nobody wants to answer, and we'll maybe have a little fun along the way. \

    Questions Answered:
    * Where did HTML5 come from and why did they do it?
    * How did HTML5 get to W3C, and how is that working out?
    * What is the WHAT-WG's role now, and what will it do next?
    * How come X(3D) is out of HTML5 but (accesske)Y is in it?
    * What are the political drivers for video?

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

  • The Science of Influence

    by Marshall Kirkpatrick, Dan Zarrella, Ramya Krishnamurthy and Michael Wu

    Influential people, from journalists and entrepreneurs to investors and developers are idea-generators shaping the ideas we drool over and discuss et infinitum. But who are these people leading the charge? How did they come to be, and rise above the rest to gather a following?

    Sites like Twitter and Facebook are now testing grounds for quantifying the world’s leaders. But do we understand what influence means and what variables are really at play? We all know that a follower count means nothing, but what does a RT mean? Or better yet, what does an @reply by Scoble mean vs. one from Arrington? Beneath the surface is where the science gets really interesting.

    In this panel you’ll hear from the experts who are distilling influence down to it’s basic components. They’ll explain tips for increasing influence, which variables really matter and the types of influence they are discovering across the web.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In TX Ballroom 2-4, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • What Digital Tribes can Learn from Native Americans

    by Allison Aldridge-Saur, Circe Sturm, Lou Ordorica and Holly Counter Beaver

    Tribalism has become a new buzz concept for social networking, but what is a tribe really? In this panel we will explore what Native Americans know about tribal systems and what holds them together, motivates membership and how to tap into that to support or create lasting tribes. There are 3 fundamental components: leadership, vision and ritual that can be the basis for tribal identification.

    Check out http://www.dgtltribe.com for more info

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In TX Ballroom 5-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage sketch note

  • PepsiCo Post-game: Groupon and Social Commerce

    by Travis Kalanick and Frank Gruber

    Join us with Frank Gruber (TechCocktail) and Travis Kalanick (Uber Cab) following Groupon CEO Andrew Mason’s presentation for a provocative discussion on the increasingly social marketplace. Where is it headed, and what does it mean for retailers, agencies, and consumers? What happens when promotion becomes content, when site pursue self-proclaimed “baffling initiatives,” and when entire ancillary markets of coupon trading rise in their wake?

    At 12:00pm to 12:45pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Meeting Room 2, Austin Convention Center

  • Better Crowdsourcing: Lessons Learned From the3six5 Project

    by John Winsor, Daniel Honigman, Len Kendall and Heidi Hackemer

    365 Days. 365 Voices

    "the3six5" started on January 1st, 2010 and ultimately crowdsourced the story of an entire year from the perspective of a different person each day. The authors come from a variety of backgrounds and geographic locations and together revealed our collective conscious of what took place over the course of 365 days. While the individual tales shared with the public were an amazing result, we'd like to share the learnings and anecdotes that happened behind the scenes of this seemingly simple (but quite the opposite) crowdsourced project that took us from nothing, to a published book.

    Ranging from an unknown senior citizen in Nashville, TN, to a physicist working at CERN in Switzerland, to major personalities like Baratunde Thurston or Ann Curry, guiding this project and PEOPLE every single day as a mere "side project" to our day jobs taught us many things. Many of our fans and authors often made the point that, "the case-study of this project will be just as interesting as the project itself" and we would like to finally share the inside story of the commitment, humor, and stress that came along with bringing this crowdsourced project from January 1st, to December 31st one day at a time.

    This session will serve those who are seeking to develop their own crowd-fueled web content by sharing the mistakes and revelations that the3six5 experiment taught us.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage sketch note

  • Big in Japan: Outreaching to a Unique Market

    by Akinori Koto, Ryan Holmes, Fumi Yamazaki, Marcus Nelson and Robert Laing

    Web and mobile technology have developed differently in Japan than any other country with hardware, features and social communities which are completely unique to this singular market. But Japanese companies are now realizing this introverted market position isn't sustainable and are now looking towards technology from outside and exploring way to create technology for outside of their country.

    Japan has ubiquitous high-speed coverage and a voracious appetite for tech gadgets, however, their tools have developed with entirely different features than other countries. For example: Japan's "Galapo-phones" commonly include streaming TV and multi-character sets, Mixii and Gree each have more than 30 million users on their social networks, and Yahoo is a whole different experience from US counter-part.

    With meteoric growth in Twitter and network tools, Japan aims on becoming the regional leader for emerging social web technologies -- much like their early leadership in consumer electronics and gaming industries. This presents opportunities for collaboration and partnerships but localizing requires more than translation.

    This panel will discuss the unique characteristics of Japanese web and mobile market including tactics for connecting to markets, identifying opportunities, and outreaching to audiences, plus understanding unexpected cultural nuances and consumer expectations.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Salon D, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage sketch note

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