Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 on Sunday 13th March in Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

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  • 15 Slides, Three Writers, Three Ways -- One Hour

    by Jim Coudal, John Gruber and rands

    In this presentation, you will see the same set of 15 slides -- three times. Three different writers will walk through the same set of slides and explain their approaches to getting started, editing ideas, figuring out how to get unstuck, and understanding when they're done. Part improv and part preparation, this presentation will give you three totally different and unexpected perspectives regarding the art of writing.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • App Savvy - Think First, Code Later

    by David Barnard, Natalia Luckyanova, Phillip Ryu, Ken Yarmosh and Christopher Brown

    Before a single pixel is created, a line of code is written, or a marketing plan is conceived, a prospective app should be looked at strategically. Questions like, “What devices should be targeted?,” “Which category provides the best opportunity for success?,” or "How much will this app cost?," can have direct impacts on the actual development process.

    This panel will explore the often overlooked, assumed, or ignored product strategy aspects of application development, describing them conceptually while showing them in practice for successful apps on the App Store.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage slide deck

  • Conde Nast in Start Up Mode

    by Andrew Siegel and Mark Johnson

    There is no doubt that the folks at 4 Times Square are big media, however, in the last year there has been a shift in thinking at Conde Nast, where folks have been creatively working with start ups both inside and out of the company. Hear how.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In S. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Hacking the News: Applying Computer Science to Journalism

    by Tristan Harris, Trei Brundrett, Jennifer 8. Lee, Upendra Shardanand and Burt Herman

    Reporters and editors work in ways that are still largely tied to old print and broadcast models. Applying lessons from computer science can help make journalism more scalable, flexible and personalized.

    This panel will discuss developments such as object-oriented programming, model-view controller frameworks, database-driven Web applications and social code repositories -- and explore how these principles can be applied to journalism and create the future of storytelling.

    For example, making stories in an object-oriented mindset can help journalists work more efficiently, reusing and building on past work. Stories can be created as structured data that can be mashed up and viewed in more flexible ways by readers. Readers can get personalized stories that highlight what's new to them -- rather than having to read through what they already know to glean the latest news.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Open for News: Turning Journalism Inside Out

    by Ian Katz and Jemima Kiss

    What do you think the future of journalism should look like? As technology enables a new era of both journalism and media business, both are being redefined through new tools and practices. Activists, dissidents and whistleblowers have a global platform for protest, and journalists can tap an unprecedented range and depth of sources. But what are the best models for sharing information and collaborating through the internet? Information may want to be free, but how should it be organised? And what do the mechanisms of networked journalism and collaboration look like?

    Journalists, and the organisations they work for, need to incorporate new technologies and adapt the ways they work, breaking down the walls between themselves and readers and placing themselves at the centre of the conversation. What are the limitations of existing tools? How does journalism need to adapt, and how could a network of collaboration help that transformation? What have been the most successful examples of open journalism so far?

    As discussion over the neutrality of the internet intensifies, perhaps we should consider a new, non-commercial internet space free from government intervention - a new interpretation of the fourth estate. A digital public space where copyright and collaboration are reinvented. What can journalism and the media learn from successful 'openness' campaigns of the web, of business and open government?

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In N. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • UX Research & Web Analytics: X-Ray Insights

    by Austin Govella, Louis Rosenfeld and Fred Beecher

    Do you want your website to meet both your business goals and your users' needs? Understanding what people do on your site gives you the x-ray insight crucial to effective business decisions. In this workshop, we'll provide a practical framework for squaring
    quantitative evidence and qualitative insights. We'll see concrete examples from search log and click path analysis. We'll also learn how you can continually measure the quality of a site's user experience.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage slide deck

  • Bloggers Fight Back: Legal Workshop for Music Bloggers

    by Mehan Jayasuriya and Michael Weinberg

    Have you ever received a takedown notice for an MP3 or video you posted on your blog? Did you get clearance from a publicist only to have the label accuse you of illicitly distributing their content? Did Google delete your Blogspot blog? Are you scared to post MP3s on your blog at all for fear of being sued?

    There's a lot of confusion and disinformation out there when it comes to bloggers' rights--especially where the nuances of copyright law are concerned. In this workshop, we'll teach you how to make sure you're in the clear when posting content on your blog, exactly what your responsibilities are as a blogger and how to fight back if you're wrongfully accused. The presenters--both of whom work for the Washington D.C.-based digital rights non-profit Public Knowledge--will bring a wealth of expertise from both sides of the issue to the table. In addition to overseeing Public Knowledge's outreach and new media efforts, Mehan Jayasuriya is a freelance music blogger and photographer who has worked with publications like PopMatters, Stereogum and DCist. Michael Weinberg is a staff attorney at Public Knowledge, where he focuses on telecommunications policy, in addition to copyright reform and entertainment law.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Content First, Everything Else Second

    by Dan Neumann

    The content containers we call websites are failing their users because they put ads and page views before the needs and wants of their users. Users are becoming increasingly fed up and are actively looking for a way around this sponsored content. We are witnessing the emergence of a clear trend, one focused exclusively on making content available to consumers on their own terms. Case in point: Ad Block Plus, far and away the most downloaded plug-in ever. Another example is Safari, which now includes a feature that strips content out of its carefully designed container. Even iPad apps are getting into the mix. Two of the iPad’s most popular apps to-date are Pulse and Flipboard, both of which emphasize readability and relevance over impression-based monetization. In this session, Organic will look at how container cruft, link-bait and social broadcast have made the Web nearly unusable. The speaker will then introduce remedies to the issue, using the examples referenced above as well as a new Organic-designed iPad application that emphasizes content relevance, usability and personalization. The speaker will unveil the application at SXSW, delving into why they built it, how applications like this will shape the industry and, of course, what this means for Web users.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In S. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • The Death of the Death of Longform Journalism

    by Evan Ratliff and Max Linsky

    The web was supposed to kill longform journalism, relegate it to a slow demise in the pasture of print. The stories were just too long, conventional wisdom held. The web was about the efficient delivery of information—who had time to read 5,000 words on a browser, let alone pay for the privilege?

    Longform journalism was going to die. And it almost did.

    But the combination of elegant mobile devices and innovative apps has proven that the audience for longform journalism still exists—and has the potential to grow. Turns out, the problem wasn’t that the stories were too long. People love stories! The problem was that nobody had spent much time thinking about how best, for readers, to present and distribute them digitally.

    At the same moment that many publishers were being forced to give up on the feasibility of longform work, readers were finally given the tools to read pieces when, how, and where they wanted to.

    This panel will discuss: what those tools are, how they’re being used, how some publishers are taking advantage of them, how other publishers are failing to take advantage of them, how the digital reading experience will continue to evolve, why journalists will always be the core audience for longform journalism, the iPad and the Kindle, Instapaper and Readability, and whether or not anyone is making any money from this stuff.

    This panel will not discuss: the upside of paginating long stories.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In N. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Creative JavaScript and HTML(5) Visual Effects

    by Seb Lee-Delisle

    It's time to get creative with JavaScript! Seb Lee-Delisle, Founding partner of BAFTA winning agency Plug-in Media, shows you how to create beautiful visual effects in HTML5 canvas in this 2.5 hour workshop.

    He'll also demonstrate how easy it is to convert 3D points into 2D and show you how to make your very own JavaScript 3D engine.

    Bring a laptop and prepare to get coding!

    At 3:30pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage handout

  • Do Tablets Dream of Electric News?

    by Jennifer Brook and Erin Sparling

    News organizations are investing a lot of faith and hope into news apps for tablets. Although they have embraced the iPad in different ways, similar design, product, and user experience problems have surfaced. What strategies must be applied to craft design experiences that are more illustrious than the browser? Through taming APIs, feeds, and algorithms, can they entice readers, seasoned and new to make an app a part of their daily news consumption ritual? With stakeholders from both the print and digital world, how do teams surface, manage, and design for divergent expectations? We have made it through the launch, and subsequent updates to, the first news iPad apps and will discuss design considerations and constraints we’ve encountered through this process.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In N. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage write-up

  • Embracing NoSQL - Your First Cassandra Project

    by Ryan King, Jared Carroll, Rudy Jahchan, Michael Wynholds and Rob Pak

    What is Cassandra? What is NoSQL? Why are sites like Facebook, Twitter, Google and Digg all using these new technologies? And what does that mean to me?

    The popularity of the NoSQL movement has exploded in the last year or two, as a number of these non-traditional data storage systems have gone from experimental curiosities to powerful production-ready engines that power the largest real-time social networking sites on the Web.

    Born out of Facebook, Cassandra is one of super-hot players in this new movement. We recently had an opportunity to build a new social networking site using it for the first time, and we want to share what we learned.

    In this presentation:

    • You will discover the NoSQL movement and the big players who lead it.
    • You will learn both *how* and *why* you should build your site using Cassandra.
    • You will understand what Cassandra offers, and how it differs from traditional databases as well as other NoSQL competitors like CouchDB and MongoDB.
    • You will walk through real code examples that can help you bootstrap your own Cassandra project.
    • You will see where we stumbled along the way, so you can avoid making the same mistakes.

    Code samples are in Ruby on Rails.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Media Tomorrow: The Message is the Messenger

    by Jenn Van Grove, Jeremiah Owyang, Leslie Bradshaw, Joe Chernov and Sarah Evans

    Disruptive technologies and corroding trust in business have combined turn Marshall McLuhan’s adage “the medium is the message” inside out. Information now spreads laterally, triggered not by institution but by individual. The message is the messenger. This panel will explore how four individuals are reshaping the design, consulting, PR and journalism industries by understanding how information is consumed today.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Social Viewing - The Future of Broadcast?

    by Matt Bonin

    The blurring of the internet and the real world is happening more and more. Over 70% of today’s TV audience also goes online while watching their shows. Social media is an everyday part of our lives. What does the next form of broadcasting and storytelling look like? This presentation will take a look at case studies, explain the technologies and broadcasting partners that allow real time streaming and provide an in-depth examination of our recent project, DavidonDemand.com. This social media experiment sent David Perez to Cannes, France as his life was streamed live 24/7 to the internet with every move controlled by requests from Twitter.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 13th March

    In S. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Investigative Tweeting? Secrets of the New Interactive Reporting

    by Monika Bauerlein

    How did a nonprofit news operation scoop the New York Times and Washington Post in breaking news and on-the-ground photos and video of the BP oil spill catastrophe? And why did drive-by readers suddenly become community evangelists for this coverage, spreading the word about reporters' Twitter feeds, supporting investigations financially, and going vigilante on rude website commenters? We'll tell you step by step how Mother Jones magazine did it and how you can replicate our wild success. We'll also talk about how a print-media stalwart can transform itself into a nimble 24/7 news operation, and why social media is God's gift to journalism. Bring your ideas, this will be an interactive session: We'll highlight 5 other under-the-radar media experiments and why they worked, 10 practical tips media professionals need to learn from Silicon Valley, and work with interested audience members in a (gentle) experimental pitch slam.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In S. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Why Journalists Need to Think Like Geeks

    by Blake Eskin

    Many print journalists, even those who resisted change, are trying to embrace the digital future. Twenty-year veterans take up social media after taking a buyout, and journalism programs now give aspiring reporters basic multimedia skills. But a facility with Twitter or Soundslides combined with an occupational knack for asking questions won't always add up to the skills necessary to redesign a Web site or create an app. The truth is, journalists and programmers think in fundamentally different ways—words vs. code; stories vs. systems—and often have a hard time communicating and collaborating. And the problem is asymmetrical; most programmers can quickly grasp enough about journalism to work with journalists, but it's much harder to get, say, a midlevel editor to understand the basics of software development or database design. I often find myself wishing I could recommend a course to that colleague or to an unemployed journalist that would teach them how the other half thinks. Most of us have had to muddle through on our own, until we have a road to Damascus moment. But there's got to be a better way. How can we teach journalists to think about technology?

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In N. Capitol View, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Why New Authors Should Think Like Indie Bands

    by Gavin St Ours

    The publishing world is wrought with uncertainty. Traditional book sales are down, digital publishing is in its infancy, and publishing houses, faced with shrinking budgets, are forced to shy away from publishing novels written by new, untested authors.

    The rules of the industry are changing. Before approaching agents and publishers, new fiction authors are working to self-publish and grow audiences with social media tools. When they approach a publisher with a new novel and a built-in audience, they take note.

    On this panel, hear from literary agents and authors describe the way the industry is changing and why it doesn't mean doom-and-gloom for unknown fiction writers. They'll share success stories, practical advice, and opinions on the future of publishing.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 13th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol