Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 of type Solo on Monday 14th March

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  • Does the Future Include Synthetic Life?

    by J. Craig Venter

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage write-up

  • Free Your Content! Who Really Owns UGC?

    by J.R. Johnson

    This panel will champion the idea of “Power to the Content Contributor!” We’ll discuss who really owns the content shared by millions of contributors across the hundreds of different user generated content sites. It's among the best-kept secrets in UGC, and the implications here are huge. The seemingly logical means of UGC sites covering their legal bases has actually left open a very meaningful loophole for contributors. Turns out, they’re sitting on the goldmine of UGC… and it’s at their discretion where it lives, and consequently which sites it will benefit. When a site like Yelp is valued at $500 million dollars, it’s only reasonable for people to start considering how they could be benefiting from the content that others are profiting from. Contributors are starting to ask questions… thinking, hey! I just made that site worth millions, but what do I get out of it?

    It’s only a matter of time until a new system emerges in the UGC space, allowing contributors to share some of the revenue being made off of their content. The question is… what will that future model look like? We’ll discuss how it could set up, and which players are poised to take the lead. In addition, we will cover how contributors can determine where their content gets the most benefit.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Capitol View Terrace, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Geppetto's Army: Creating International Incidents with Twitter Bots

    by Greg Marra

    Twitter has proven to be an invaluable tool for communication during intense periods of political unrest and social suppression. When thousands of people tweet about oppressive regimes and violence against protesters, the outside world gets a chance to understand events on the ground.

    But what if none of those thousands of people were real, and the events never happened?

    Previous research has shown that Twitter bots can build up a following, garnering hundreds of emotionally invested followers who are fooled into believing the bots are real. A single puppetmaster could create hundreds of Twitter bots, letting them live perfectly normal and believable lives for months while they build up followers. Then one day, a careful crafted false story unfolds on the stage of social media, played out by a single director with hundreds of actors. Incidents like Balloon Boy demonstrate that powerful stories can become widespread before there is time for fact checking. Before anyone realizes all the TwitPics of the massacre are faked, the fake event will have made international headlines.

    This presentation will discuss the technical feasibility of such an attack on the global media infrastructure and discuss the implications of a news system that trusts "recent" over "reputable".

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Machine Learning and Social Media

    by Bruce Smith

    Social media applications encounter messy user-generated data in blog posts, status updates, tweets, user profiles, etc. These documents contain free-form text that obeys no particular rules of grammar, punctuation or spelling.

    If the data is so messy, how can a computer program recognize adult content or hate speech or spam? How can a computer program tell the difference between an advertisement and a product review? How can a computer program distinguish between a positive and a negative product review?

    Machine learning offers some solutions. For example, given sample tweets labeled (by people) as spam or non-spam, machine learning tools can generate a program (or model) that attempts to duplicate the human judgments. You could use this kind of model in your application to filter out tweet spam.

    In this talk we will describe
    •Some common machine learning algorithms
    •Machine learning tools – free and commercial
    •Acquiring and managing training data
    •Extracting useful features from your documents
    •Choosing the right technique for a problem
    •Measuring quality and improving your model over time
    •Integrating a machine learned model with your application

    Coming out of this session, you will know where you might use machine learning in your applications, and you will know how to get started.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Neurons Sparking!: Design with the Brain in Mind!

    by M A Greenstein

    **Are you curious about the new brain game design industry?

    **Have you explored the options of including a neuroscientist on your team of interactive and immersive media designers?

    Today, interactive and immersive media design draws on contemporary neuroscience to leverage the best odds of playing "somatosensory," "memory," "dopamine reward” and “inhibitory control” systems in the human brain and extended nervous system. From animated narrative scripting to skill building brain games or “apps”, functional knowledge of the human brain gives the 21st media designer an edge in working across the spectrum of interactive and immersive game media.

    This session starts with two simple, critical questions: What does neuroscience and cognitive science hold for the future of interactive and immersive media design? How can media designers prepare now for a future where "brain smart" games will be the means by which we learn, play, invent and transform lives through interactive media? Join us and find out.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Salon D, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Unbelievable eCommerce: Increase Sales By 10000%

    by Paul Boag

    Many believe the secret to a successful ecommerce site is to copy Amazon. However, that rarely works.

    Your website is not Amazon. Instead it has a unique offering that caters to a specific audience. Once you realise that you can achieve unbelievable things.

    In his talk Paul explains how he took one ecommerce website from relatively successful beginnings to unbelievable heights. In only 5 years he and the team at Headscape increased sales on the site by a staggering 10,000%. What makes the story even more unbelievable is that the average customer is over 80 years old!

    This single example will act as a case study that guides you towards better understanding your audience and growing your online sales significantly.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 14th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage video link

  • Web Designer's Guide to iOS Apps

    by Kristofer Layon

    This book session is about how web designers can use HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to build native iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad applications. By leveraging their existing skills, web designers can do the same specialized and content-specific work for Apple’s mobile platforms as they do for the web. And by combining their design skills with the NimbleKit code framework (the only Objective-C library that is featured as an Apple Development Tool), designers can focus exclusively on interface and content design without needing to write Objective-C. Don’t just emulate the iOS look and feel with other options: use NimbleKit, HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to create fully native Objective-C apps for the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad.

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom G, Austin Convention Center

  • 5 Steps to Bulletproof UX Strategy

    by Robert Hoekman

    Writers from BusinessWeek, Harvard Business Review, Wired, and even Rolling Stone have all pronounced that design thinking - the process of developing products and services that are both feasible and meet user needs - is the key to successful innovation. And they're right. What they don't tell you is that all the design thinking in the world won't help your company unless your innovations serve a higher purpose. But the vast majority of businesses have no higher purpose. As a result, their products and features are disconnected from their goals. Their marketing is focused on value-adds rather than value propositions. Their message has no message. There's no there there.

    That's where experience strategy comes in. Experience strategy is design thinking for your whole business. It tells you which ideas will help and which won't. It tells you if that new product will lead to a unified brand or a disjointed one. It's what turns a shoe store into Zappos, a car company into MINI, and a software company into Apple.

    In this session, Robert Hoekman, Jr - author of Designing the Obvious (New Riders) and Designing the Moment (New Riders), and Web Anatomy (New Riders) - presents the essential elements of experience strategy. He reveals the five steps to developing a great UX strategy so you can stop navigating your way through the trees and instead start designing the forest.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Better Innovation, Design and Sustainability via Open Source

    by Hannah Jones and Andrew Zolli

    The need has never been greater than it is today for action to be taken on separating consumption from the use of natural resources if we are all to thrive in a future sustainable economy.

    Nike believes that design, innovation and a commitment to open source data and collaboration will help fast track the work needed to architect a sustainable roadmap.

    This session will explore the internal and external pressures that are creating a platform for Nike to start a conversation with the design and development community around the value and application of intellectual property and data to help find solutions to some of the most intractable sustainability problems.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Creation, Curation, and the Ethics of Content Strategy

    by Margot Bloomstein

    From Monet to MTV, what practices connect the salons of Paris with Danger Mouse, NFL.com, and Facebook? More importantly, what's your place in that continuum? If you work with content, embrace your place in the ethical debate of creation and curation. It's nothing new—but it's time for user experience practitioners to acknowledge it.

    Why? Both companies' and consumers' expectations of user experience have matured, promoting content strategy in interactive teams, efficient projects, and satisfying user experiences. Content strategists shape communication goals, hierarchy, and taxonomy. Innocent choices? Or politics, discrimination, and the dark side of design?

    If you ignore these pitfalls of content strategy, what are the ethical implications? We'll discuss this through the lens of content correlation and "merchandising" on news sites, editing and mashing up to “create” anew, and curating in traditional settings like museums. From seemingly benign audits and style guidelines through published content packages, do curators create meaning? If so, how should content strategists confront similar choices?

    It's been a breakout year for content strategy. Come hear why now we need to confront its ethical relevance—and learn about the missteps of teams that don't—through the lens of case studies and the perspective of the new publishing landscape.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Capitol View Terrace, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage slide deck

  • Cryptography, Technology, Privacy: Philip Zimmermann, Inventor of PGP

    by Phil Zimmermann

    Philip R. Zimmermann, technology visionary and internet folk hero, says “it is sometimes better to take direct action to change unjust laws”. He is an encryption guru and privacy innovator who has made huge personal sacrifices to create technology that protects people around the world. Phil is the creator of Pretty Good Privacy, an email encryption software package. Originally designed as a human rights tool, PGP was published for free on the Internet in 1991. This made Zimmermann the target of a three-year criminal investigation because the government held that US export restrictions for cryptographic software were violated when PGP spread worldwide. Despite the lack of funding, the lack of any paid staff, the lack of a company to stand behind it, and despite government persecution, PGP nonetheless became the most widely used email encryption software in the world.
    Phil has recently focused on launching a secure VoIP protocol that allows people to make encrypted phone calls over the internet. He will discuss why encrypted phone calls are the next evolution in privacy, why easily wiretapped, unsecure VoIP is bad for society and good for organized crime, and how a secure VoIP protocol will protect the criminal justice system. Other topics include the effects of pervasive surveillance technology on democratic institutions and the future of consumer authentication.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • How the Web is Changing Dutch Politics

    by Ruben Bos

    The Netherlands is ranked third in the world when it comes to broadband access per capita. Mobile internet is available in nearly every corner of the country. The penetration of social media is huge. For example, 60% of the Dutch population is a member of Hyves, the biggest social network in The Netherlands. The web is very dominant in The Netherlands. Politicians know this. Nearly the whole parliament is active on Twitter. Something really exciting is starting to show in The Netherlands. The traditional gap between politicians and people is getting smaller. How can we get beyond Twitter? In this presentation, Ruben will explain how we can help politicians to make this gap even smaller. He will explain how he helped transforming the Labour website into an awesome personal blog. He will explore what political parties can learn from websites like Good.is on how they use info graphics to tell their story. Politics don't have to be dull and impersonal. Don't be scared, this presentation won't be either.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Rebooting the Media Industry: A How to Guide

    by Bram Cohen

    BitTorrent didn’t invent the Internet. It just changed the game. In 2001 the BitTorrent protocol was launched into the world. It turned rich media distribution economics on its head by making efficient use of consumer bandwidth and enabling transfers to get faster the more popular a file is.

    Fast-forward to today and the whole media industry has been turned upside down. From newspapers to music to film, the way content is distributed and how users want to consume it has completely changed. The growth of the Internet created a disruptive model that caused a shift from physical to digital media, and many in the media industry unprepared for the change have been left scrambling.

    Resistance doesn’t stop change from happening, but it can make it more painful. If anything, the dramatic consolidation in the newspaper industry should be a lesson for other media industries that evolution is not a choice, but a best practice for creating a sustainable business model.

    Paid download, subscription, ad-supported or freemium. Which business model will be most effective in generating value? There is not a clear winner, but different online communities as well as types of content will lend themselves to each in varying ways. Continued product development will provide choice to the consumer and they will vote by their actions. The different consumption models and tastes of users will create number of opportunities for monetization by creators as well as more options for consumers.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Your Data in the Cloud: Privacy, Ownership, Convenience

    by Daniel Putterman

    There’s no topic with more buzz around it than the “cloud.” However, for all the aspects of our social and commercial lives we entrust to the cloud, at the same time we surrender our data, and increasingly our memories and finances, to others. Who controls that data, who protects it and who ensures our privacy? There are however possibilities for creating one’s own cloud, and retaining a measure control over off-site data and services, both software and hardware based. We’ll explore a number of solutions to the notion of a personal cloud, and the trade-offs inherent in that choice.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Apps, APIs & Syndication: Creativity in the Post-Website Era

    by Oren Michels

    The days of consumers sitting at a full-sized monitor browsing a website populated with your content alone are quickly evaporating. In order to succeed you need to take your experience and your brand to where your users are – mobile devices, collaborative applications and mashups, gaming consoles and third-party platforms. Branded websites as we know them are fast being replaced by mashups of content from multiple sources layered together or targeted experiences that take advantage of the immediacy, location awareness and ubiquity of mobile apps.
    This change is no cause for panic. In fact, for those that remain innovative, nimble, and open to new ways of developing business it can be one of the best opportunities to come along since the web itself.

    This session presents how to engage end users with your brand when designing online experiences means placing your data or functionality on others’ web properties (ones you don’t control) and vice versa.

    We’ll explore how others have been able to build their brand while embracing the concept of platform and how you can redefine partnerships and engage developers creating the apps that define the next wave of digital engagement. The session will cover concepts critical to online success like web services, platform development and APIs including a tour of some of the best examples of brands and pervasive experiences proliferating the digital network.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Authentication Fails = ID Thieves Succeed. What's Next?

    How does a retailer, bank or any business know they’re interacting with you & not an imposter? Consumers need thoughtful, scalable & user-friendly authentication solutions to stop ID theft & protect reputations & assets. We’ll discuss ID theft & authentication, lessons learned addressing these problems, & how technology + new approaches are paving the way forward. ID fraud & authentication are discussed together because the challenges they create, when one fails & the other succeeds, are endless. ID theft is caused by a failure of authentication & is a concern for ANY industry that handles valuable assets – like money, credit cards, SSN, health records, or World of Warcraft characters. ID theft is commonly talked about & feared, but not always understood. We’ll discuss what it means & how it’s executed. We’ll also share ID theft examples, from mundane to insane & prove that the systems that allow this to happen are clearly broken. When it comes to authentication, a thief can convince someone that they are you, but a thief cannot convince you that he is you – the heart of why consumer participation & strong authentication are so important. When consumers are allowed to participate in transactions, identity theft stops. Architects, engineers & companies have approached authentication in a variety of ways. We’ll go through technical examples & lessons learned from these schemes & show that challenges still exist. We’ll then discuss current innovations & the path forward.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Broadcasting Value: How Twitter Users Communicate Relevance

    by Rion Snow

    Twitter is redefining the way information is reported, spread, interacted with, and absorbed. Each individual on Twitter can fluidly act as a primary source, a filter, an information catalyst, and a consumer. Taken collectively, the information preferences expressed by Twitter users provide a valuable signal indicating the relevance of information and information sources across Twitter and the web as a whole. In this talk we consider the information ecosystem of Twitter through the lenses of lists, top tweets, and trending topics, exploring the emergence and value of transparently communicated information preferences.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Room 204, AT&T Conference Center

  • Disrupted, Again: The Next Chapter in News

    by Matt Williams

    The way we find and read the news continues to change. Just as the web disrupted print media in the last decade, now social networks, news aggregators (like Digg), and innovations from startups are once again disrupting how online news is consumed. An order of magnitude more content is produced today than in years past and rapid innovation continues to change the way that news is found and read. What are some of the driving forces behind how news is created, discovered and consumed? How is the social graph and the interest graph changing the way we find and read the news? How will a culture of citizen journalism affect what we read and who we trust? In this session, we explore these issues through the lens of content creators, aggregators, advertisers and venture capitalists, and offer a perspective on how the news landscape will dramatically change in the next five years.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Capitol View Terrace, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Everyone’s Wrong about Influence. Except your Customers

    by Valeria Maltoni

    What is influence? For a decade, Malcom Gladwell's "The Tipping Point" has served as a touchstone for those who believe that influence resides in the hands of a select few. Not so, says a new generation of marketers. They believe that thanks to the democratizing power of the Internet, anyone can be an Influential.

    Both camps are wrong. True influence flows from drawing together people with shared interests. This session focuses on the process of identifying areas of relevancy among your customers and prospects, building community, and allowing others to amplify your influence as you meet their needs.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom F, Austin Convention Center

  • Game On: 7 Design Patterns For User Engagement

    by Nadya Direkova

    How do you drive up user engagement? What game-like design patterns get your users to complete the sign-up, bring friends and come back? This session will expose the design patterns of engagement and incentives, including relevant metrics. Led by Nadya Direkova, Sr. Designer at Google and game designer, it will teach useful techniques that can drive up - and keep - your user base. You will leave with an arsenal of 7 design patterns to: design effective sign-up sessions and tutorials, promote virality, invite return visits, and apply game mechanics beyond points and bagdes. About the speaker: Nadya Direkova is Google’s local search designer and a game mechanics consultant - helping millions of users find knowledge and fun. She comes from the world of game design, having created fun games for Leapfrog and Backbone. She’s taught design at M.I.T. and spoken at IXDA’09 and SXSW’10.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

  • How Game Dynamics Can Change Real-World Experiences

    by Dennis Crowley and Pete Cashmore

    Foursquare CEO and co-founder Dennis Crowley will discuss how a new wave of location-based applications are changing the way we interact with our friends and surroundings. New mobile technologies combined with enhanced game dynamics are helping people experience the world around them in new and different ways. Dennis will walk through some of the foundational elements that feed into the current model, what this means for the future, and how foursquare can manufacture serendipity.

    Previously, Crowley founded Dodgeball, one of the first mobile social services in the U.S., which was acquired by Google in 2005. He has been named one of the "Top 35 Innovators Under 35" by MIT's Technology Review magazine. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Wired, Time Magazine and Newsweek. Dennis holds a Master's degree from New York University's Interactive Telecommunications Program and a Bachelor's degree from the Newhouse School at Syracuse University.

    Interviewing Crowley will be Pete Cashmore, CEO and founder of Mashable.com, the online guide to social media. One of the top 10 blogs worldwide, Mashable is a hub for those looking to make sense of the online realm.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage sketch note

  • Net Neutrality Forever? The Very Long View

    by Tim Wu

    This session will address the Net Neutrality question over the very long term: identifying the issue's significance over the long term trends in the evolution of the Internet. The presentation will draw on early theories of the Internet and comparisons to similar moments in the telephone and radio industry in the 20th century. The basic question is whether Net Neutrality rules can "lock in" an open internet, or whether they are on the path to long-term monopolization and consolidation.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Town Lake Ballroom, Radisson Hotel & Suites Austin-Town Lake

  • NPR’s API: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

    by Zach Brand

    Over the last year, NPR's total page view growth has increased by more than 80%. How did we get that much growth? Our API.

    The NPR API went live to the public in July 2008 and was designed with the philosophy of Create Once, Publish Everywhere (COPE). Through COPE, NPR has been able to quickly and efficiently distribute content to virtually anywhere, including NPR stations, partners and the general public.

    The biggest impact that the API has made, however, is with our mobile strategy. The API has enabled NPR product owners to build specialized apps on a wide range of platforms and devices, liberating them from being dependent on custom development to access the content. Through this process, we built our iPhone and iPad apps, mobile sites, open sourced Android app and HTML5 site, some of which were turned around in a matter of weeks!

    Delivering more than one billion stories a month and serving thousands of product owners, partners, stations and public users, the API has clearly become the centerpiece of the NPR's digital media and mobile strategy. In this session, you will learn all about the guts of this mission-critical system (from a technical and business perspective), our publishing processes, our moblie strategy and other related aspects of our digital distribution approach.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Platform Success: Earning Developers’ Trust, Hearts and Minds

    by Peter Hoddie

    How can developers thrive in the age of the mobile revolution? Platform innovators must cultivate developers on many levels, from ease of development to promotion of apps to potential to make money.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Room 12AB, Austin Convention Center

  • Sentiment of Two Women: Sentiment Analysis & Social Media

    by Lillian Lee and Bo Pang

    "What do other people think?" has always been an important consideration to most of us when making decisions. Long before the World Wide Web, we asked our friends who they were planning to vote for and consulted Consumer Reports to decide which dishwasher to buy. But the Internet has (among other things) made it possible to learn about the opinions and experiences of those in the vast pool of people that are neither our personal acquaintances nor well-known professional critics --- that is, people we have never heard of. Enter sentiment analysis, a flourishing research area devoted to the computational treatment of subjective and opinion-oriented language. Sample phenomena to contend with range from sarcasm in blog postings to the interpretation of political speeches. This talk will cover some of the motivations, challenges, and approaches in this broad and exciting field.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Room 203, AT&T Conference Center

  • So I Started a Food Blog

    by Molly Wizenberg

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Hill Country AB, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Terrorism 2.0: Al Qaeda's Online Tools

    by Garrett Graff

    The web, it is often said, inherently benefits the insurgent. Thus it's no surprise that it's becoming the medium of choice for terrorists and violent extremist groups around the world.
    Tracing "terror 2.0" from the November 2008 attacks in Mumbai - arguably the first networked terrorist attack - up through the Times Square bomber, who was radicalized after watching online videos from Muslim cleric Anwar Al-Awlaki and others, this presentation will examine how terrorists are using the same tools we're developing for spreading information and social networking in the West for their own nefarious purposes - even sometimes live online to coordinate unfolding attacks.

    Learn how al Qaeda, the Iraq insurgency, Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Taliban, and even Russian organized crime is running scams, coordinating attacks, recruiting followers, raising money, and living their lives online alongside regular web users. For instance, the Taliban's website was, for a long period, hosted on a server in Houston, Texas, and al Qaeda's primary webmaster - who helped pass around online bomb-making guides, radical videos, downloadable extremist sermons, and hostage videos - turned out to be a 22-year-old geek in West London.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In TX Ballroom 5-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • The Harassment Predicament: Minimizing Abuse, Maximizing Free Speech

    by delbius

    Online services tread a narrow line between enabling free speech and preventing abuse of members. Offline, harassment is often determined contextually; unfortunately, website owners and operators often lack the time, insight, and ability to determine the context surrounding a given behavior. Additionally, the speech itself may not be directly abusive; thus, identifying other vectors for abuse is becoming increasingly important. As a result, Del Harvey, the Director of Twitter's Trust and Safety department, has spent a significant amount of the past two years working to develop objective litmus tests for evaluating potentially abusive behavior in the absence of context. This presentation will draw upon the work done at Twitter as well as Del's previous background working with online safety advocates to provide practical and doable policies and suggestions for sites to utilize with a minimum of engineering investment and personnel needs.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

  • Better Living Through Cloud Computing

    by Jon Wiley

    Cloud computing is finally coming out of the trough of disillusionment along the hype cycle. Is it really possible to live your life in the clouds? Can you ditch the desktop? Can you buck the backup? Come learn about the state-of-the-art in untethered cloud computing services that will lighten your life and make any computer personal.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Beyond the Check-In: Location and the Social Web

    by Josh Williams

    Location-based services (LBS) are continuing to experience exponential growth, however, mass adoption is making the check-in ubiquitous. Sometimes lost in those discussions about technology and thousands and thousands of check-ins is the secret sauce behind these services – the basic and ever-present human desire to share. Josh Williams, co-founder and CEO of Austin-based Gowalla, will detail why he and his team have been looking beyond the concept of simply checking in at locations — and how people’s interest in sharing where they are and what they’re doing with friends, family, and the public-at-large is a stepping stone on the path to how people will continue to communicate and express themselves.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

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