Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 of type Solo on Tuesday 15th March

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  • Art, Architecture 2.0: Digital Spirit Invades Physical Innovation

    by Christophe Cauvy

    The digital revolution has allowed thousands of people not only to conceive great ideas but also to execute, produce them. With digital technologies, you don’t need raw materials, factories, distribution centres, stores… you can reach a worldwide audience quickly and cheaply just by using your brain and your PC.

    This innovation-led culture is now ubiquitous, and it looks like it has inspired (or liberated) not only entrepreneurs and businesspeople, but also civil servants, engineers, artists and architects: even if their ideas belong to the “physical” world, their approach belong to the digital culture.

    This presentation provides example of this new spirit of liberation: from a science-fictionesque tram station in Austria, to an Italian village that, with the help of a giant mirror, created the physical equivalent of Facebook (http://bit.ly/al875a), through to artists who conceived the ultimate hotel experience in Paris (http://tinyurl.com/ybxjlty), used physical crowd-sourcing to create a piece of art or wrote a twitter-inspired theatre play… etc.

    We are in a more open society where creativity is less constrained by cultural, technological or financial constraints. We are moving from “everyone can have ideas” or “everyone can be an artist” to “everyone is an innovator”.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 15th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Hacking RSS: Filtering & Processing Obscene Amounts of Information

    by Dawn Foster

    Information overload is less about having too much information and more about not having the right tools and techniques to filter and process information to find the pieces that are most relevant for you. This presentation will focus on showing you a variety of tips and techniques to get you started down the path of looking at RSS feeds in a completely different light. The default RSS feeds generated by your favorite blog or website are just a starting point waiting to be hacked and manipulated to serve your needs.

    Most people read RSS feeds, but few people take the time to go one step further to hack on those RSS feeds to find only the most interesting posts. I combine tools like Yahoo Pipes, BackTweets, PostRank and more with some simple API calls to be able to find what I need while automatically discarding the rest. You start with one or more RSS feeds and then feed those results into other services to gather more information that can be used to further filter or process the results. This process is easier than it sounds once you learn a few simple tools and techniques, and no “real” programming experience is required to get started. This session will show you some tips and tricks to get you started down the path of hacking your RSS feeds.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • How Social Applications SCORE in the Cloud

    by Josh Fraser

    To effectively bring a social app to the market, companies must focus not only on design and marketing, but also on the underlying – and often unglamorous – job of managing their IT infrastructure. The hope, if not the expectation – is to achieve rapid and massive popularity across the world. But many compute infrastructures are not capable of handling unpredictable growth and scaling, much less support fast, day-to-day development cycles.

    In the fast paced social app industry, development teams must have the technology agility to stay ahead of the curve. The audience will learn best practices for launching apps in the cloud and discover how industry leaders including Zynga, Playfish, and Crowdstar are using cloud computing to manage and grow their infrastructure. This session will also discuss the use of cloud computing throughout the entire application lifecycle -- from concept and development to end-of-life.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 12AB, Austin Convention Center

  • Innovation Dot Gov: Designing Democracy for the Age of Networks

    by Beth Simone Noveck

    Former White House Deputy CTO and Open Government leader addresses how to use technology to design smaller and smarter government for the 21st century. Bringing innovation to the public sector doesn’t require new legislation or new budgets. It requires changing the default way of working from closed to open.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

  • Long After the Thrill: Sustaining Passionate Users

    by Stephen Anderson

    Suffering from "game fatigue" yet? While many sites have slapped on badges and points to make things more engaging, the companies that "get it" have a better understanding of the psychology behind motivation. They know how to design sites that keep people coming back again and again.

    So what are the secrets? What actually motivates people online? How do you create sustained interest in your product or service? We'll look at everything from game design to learning theories to neuroscience to understand what motivates--and demotivates--people over the long haul.

    NOTE: This is a follow-up to the 2010 SXSW presentation "Seductive Interactions" where I focused primarily on initial engagement. Where that presentation discussed "getting to first base" with our users, this one looks much farther out at how to create "lifelong love and devotion."

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Beyond Wordclouds: Analyzing Trends with Social Media APIs

    by Chris Busse

    There are many services that will generate wordclouds and simple graphs from the conversations on social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook. These services use Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs) to access the data on the platforms then perform various analysis on that data. These tools are often very limited in their functionality, or are very expensive to use for large-scale ongoing analysis and even then they often don't cover all the needs of a dynamic organization.

    This presentation will demonstrate how to programmatically access the APIs of several social media platforms to pull out specific data, store it in a database, and perform custom analysis on it to meet the needs of various business cases.

    We'll take a look at how different social media platforms are better suited for gleaning different kinds of data. This includes Twitter and Facebook as well as various blog and location-based platforms. Specific business cases will be shown around marketing, communications, competitive intelligence, crisis management, and return on investment analysis.

    Attendees of this presentation will leave with a better understanding of how looking at the universe of online conversation as a whole can provide valuable insight into what consumers are thinking and interested in at any given moment.

    LEVEL: Advanced

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Conversational Journalism: Do's and Don'ts of Audience Participation

    by Doreen Marchionni

    Journalists and scholars have talked on and off about the idea of journalism as a conversation for nearly 20 years. It stands in contrast to decades of traditional journalism as a lecture, in which the all-knowing journalist alone decides what is news and conducts a monologue with the public on such matters, or maybe a dialogue with public officials and other elites. Citizens here are at best passive bystanders. But no more.

    Now pretty much anyone with Internet access and a few Web tools can create and distribute news, collaborate with professional journalists in real time and select what news to follow, if any, from a dizzying array of choices. The media business and academia were slow to pick up on the change but are now taking heed. Curiously, little empirical research developed to help us understand what exactly we mean by conversation and then how to apply it to journalism's most treasured values, credibility and expertise.

    Until now. This presentation explores key practical tips from doctoral research on how best to incorporate citizen audiences into online media processes. Doing it haphazardly can mean loss of perceived credibility, authority and just plain likeability. Doing it well, however, can create the kind of sustained interest we all crave for our sites.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Designing Ideas, Not Objects

    by Robert Brunner

    About the Speaker: Robert Brunner’s career as an industrial designer is deeply tied with the evolution of the high technology industry itself. The son of a development pioneer of the first hard disk drives built at IBM, the San Jose native pursued a lifelong fascination for high tech products as a designer after graduating with a degree in Industrial Design from San Jose State University in 1981.

    Robert’s work has spawned numerous brand-defining designs during the past two decades. He founded Lunar Design in 1984 after working as a designer and project manager at several Silicon Valley companies. He subsequently went on to become director of industrial design at Apple Computer in 1989, where he established the internal design group and provided design and direction for all the company's products. In 1996, he became partner in the San Francisco office of Pentagram, one of the world’s most influential design firms, working with numerous Fortune 500 companies including Dell, Amazon, Nike and Hewlett Packard on strategic brand consulting and industrial design programs.

    In 2006, alongside his tenure as a Pentagram partner, Brunner launched Fuego, a new concept in outdoor grilling. As Fuego’s chief industrial designer, Brunner is re-defining the rituals of outdoor cooking by embracing high levels of modernist design and utility. In 2007, working with Interscope Geffen A&M chairman Jimmy Iovine and hip hop icon Dr. Dre, Robert helped launch the Beats by Dr. Dre brand of headphones and created the popular Beats Studio line. In a relatively short time, Beats by Dr. Dre has become the most sought after brand in personal audio. Today, he and his team create the majority of Beats products on the market.

    Robert left Pentagram in mid 2007 to found Ammunition, a design and development studio based in San Francisco. He leads his company as founder and creative director, focusing on communicating strategic innovation through product design, brand and surrounding experience. Ammunition’s current clients include Barnes and Noble, Polaroid, Kohler, Williams Sonoma and Adobe. Robert’s work has been widely published in North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. His product designs have been recognized in numerous design and industry awards and reviews, and his work is included in the permanent design collections of the Museum of Modern Art in both New York and San Francisco. His firm Ammunition has been listed in Fast Company Magazine’s top 10 innovative design companies list for 3 years running, and last year Robert was featured in the magazine’s list of top 100 creative professionals. Robert also has taught advanced product design at Stanford University.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Freelancers: You're Five Products Away From Freedom

    by Thomas Myer

    If you're a freelancer, you know that your existence comes down to chasing after lots of client engagements, projects, gigs, whatever you want to call them. If you stop working for any reason (illness, travel, you just want or need a break) then the income stops.

    Adding products to the mix can be a really great way to add small (but potentially large!) streams of income that you can count on month after month. I'll talk about using your talents and strengths to create products (ebooks, themes/templates, photography/artwork, plugins/apps, membership sites) that will appeal to an audience and generate sales.

    Remember, even if you only create a $100/week product, it only takes 5 or 6 of those to really start making a big difference in the way you work and live. This isn't about creating a "four hour workweek" or some other hyped BS, this is about creating repeatable, realistic income streams.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Salon A, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Project 314: Putting The 'Game' Back Into ARGs

    by Adrian Hon

    Most ARGs are like icing on a cake - they make an existing TV show, movie, game or book taste even better by giving fans another way to explore and interact with the fictional universe. But you can't live on icing, so the question is: can an ARG ever work on its own, without relying on a massive audience from another medium?

    Very few have tried, and there are no enduring successes (including my own Perplex City). As a result, many have implicitly concluded that a 'native ARG' can't be done, and are now moving on to transmedia. But at Six to Start, we think it can be done, and we've been developing Project 314 to prove it.

    Project 314 is an online social game blended with an ARG, aimed at a mass audience (just like Zynga and Playfish games) but with a depth of gameplay, story, and world that they can't approach. During development, we found that there are enormous advantages in creating an ARG that's attached to an online game; for one, you can avoid the irritating friction that always occurs when switching between media; for another, it feels incredibly natural (and there are a few more to discuss)

    It took us three years to come up with the idea for Project 314, and to assemble the right team. In this talk, I'll also share why Project 314 is so important for the future of games and storytelling, why it took so long, and how other game developers can create similar games (while avoiding the pitfalls we encountered).

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 12AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage video

  • Shaping the Future with Small Moves, Smartly Made

    by John Hagel

    Most companies are content to pursue adaptation strategies in times of high uncertainty – sense and respond quickly to events as they unfold. While adaptation is certainly valuable, it misses a much greater opportunity – the ability to shape entire markets or industries in ways that create significant advantage for the shaper. While most disruptive innovation strategies focus on a single company betting heavily on a disruptive approach to the market, shaping strategies emphasize the opportunity to mobilize a very large number (thousands and, in some case, millions) of other participants to leverage investment and accelerate learning. As a result, shaping strategies can succeed with small initial moves, smartly made, that set big things in motion. This talk will review examples of successful shapers in the past to determine the key elements that determine the success of shaping strategies.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note

  • The Ten Deadly Sins of Mobile Video Calling

    by Jonathan Rosenberg

    Person to person mobile video has been the stuff of science fiction for decades, with many attempts and failures in the past. The last year has seen a bunch of real products emerge - from Apple's Facetime to Skype video calling and a host of startups in between, all improving the opportunities for genuine realtime video communications on the move. But what has taken so long? Why is mobile video calling so hard? In this presentation, Jonathan Rosenberg, Skype's Chief Technology Strategist, will touch on the ten deadly sins of mobile video calling, and discuss the technology trends which have (or have not) arrived to address them. He'll also touch on Skype's experiences in delivering video and mobile video.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Grand Ballroom, AT&T Conference Center

  • Gamestorming

    by Dave Gray, James Macanufo and Sunni Brown

    Work is getting flatter. There’s no central server dishing out orders. It’s a peer-to-peer, co-evolving world. The team that flocks together, rocks together.

    The future of work is not about dull routine, it’s about being more human. It’s about curiosity, exploration, flexibility and imagination.

    Gamestorming is for people who want to design the future, to change the world, to make, break and innovate. It's a kind of Jedi-judo for inventors, explorers and change agents who want to engage the swarm, surf the infosphere and fan the creative hive to an excited state.

    Gamestorming is a practice made of people, paper and passion. The enabling technologies are sticky notes, whiteboards, index cards, loose rules and fast action.

    Gamestorming is a mashup of game principles, game mechanics and work. It’s about weaving energy and fast-feedback loops into your work, into your meetings with co-workers, into your design and development activities.

    Gamestorming is the future of work.

    Our panel of Gamestorming Jedi will infect you with the Gamestorming virus, so you can carry it back with you and unleash the contagion to the other nodes in your network. There is no antidote.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

  • Hamlet's Blackberry

    by William Powers

    The ground is shifting in digital culture – and the paradigm, too – as we realize staring into screens 24/7 is a lousy idea. It’s time to quiet our minds, focus, go deep. But how? Luckily, human beings have been here before, and we can learn from the past. Surprising digital life-lessons from Plato, Shakespeare, Ben Franklin and Thoreau.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

  • How to Create an Internet Phenomenon for Peanuts

    by Rachel Fershleiser and Larry Smith

    In 2006, Larry Smith ditched his fancy magazine editor life to launch SMITH Magazine, an online storytelling community with no business model to speak of. He did it with no plan, no startup money, no staff, not even the proverbial “maxxed out credit cards.” One year later, SMITH Mag had amassed a ton of press, a rabid community of readers of and contributors to the site, and book deals from three major publishers.

    SMITH Magazine is best known for its Six-Word Memoir project, an international phenomenon and one the hottest storytelling trends of the modern age. So how did the Six-Word Memoir project go from a couple of tweets to four books and 300,000+ submissions to SMITH Magazine and its younger cousin, SMITH Teens so quickly?

    In this panel, Smith and his co-editor, Rachel Fershleiser, will take you through the steps (and missteps), they've learned in the Six-Word Memoir project, as well as through other online phenoms that share like-minded missions, success stories, and roads to revenue. We’ll showcase examples of unfunded/barely funded projects that began out of passion, and rapidly turned into something sustainable. We’ll go over the core principles vital to success, as well as the questions to ask before you go full throttle with your idea. We’ll talk about we and others have walked the tightrope of protecting our ideas and also allowing for a certain loss of control that ultimately allows projects to grow.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

  • Marc Ecko's Formula for AWEthentic Connections

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Salon A, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Persona-fication or: Falling in Love with a Bot

    by Kyle Bunch

    By the time SXSW ‘11 kicks off, there will be well over 500 million “people” on Facebook and well over 250 million on Twitter.

    We used to ask how many of the users on sites like MySpace had a real person on the other end. Today, as increasing sophisticated bots and artificial intelligence intersect with the simplified relationships that fill our social media spaces, we have passed the point where that really matters. The collective cry of the bots grows ever louder: "If you poke us, do we not tweet?"

    Social touchpoints like toll-free numbers have long been manned by automated systems designed to put a barrier between the customer and the people behind the scenes. Is it any surprise that the same tactics are being used when it comes to social media?

    This isn't just companies. The virtual world has always offered an opportunity to become someone else, from the earliest BBS and chat room environments to MMORPGs and now social networks. Even if you're not talking to a company-created bot, there's a good chance you're talking to someone pretending to be someone vastly different than their real world doppleganger.

    When we establish relationships with people we've never met IRL, where does someone become real? And for someone looking for interactivity, how much does ‘real’ matter? If a relationship is little more than passing timely and relevant links and media back and forth, is finding out that you're sharing a friendship with a bot really such a bad thing?

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In TX Ballroom 2-4, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage slide deck

  • Social Contests: Brand Loyalty Builders or Lazy Marketing?

    by Kelly Ripley Feller

    With the growing prevalence of Twitter and Facebook, social contests are a dime a dozen. Nearly every day another wave of "Tweet this to win" memes clog up my stream. So do these tactics really work? Or are they just easy-to-execute, lazy marketing methods? Join this session for a look at which social contests work best at building brand fans & which ones land in the lazy marketing hall of lame. Count on real-life examples, privacy & legal stuff, & my opinionated suggestions--steeped in experience--on which contests work best to win friends & influence people. Oh and I’ll probably give some stuff away, just to stick with the theme.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In TX Ballroom 1, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Tapping the Crowd to Remap the World

    by Di-Ann Eisnor

    Over the past 20 years, less-than accurate geographic maps have been developed at enormous cost with no system in place to keep them up to date. Without this kind of realtime progress, people are at the mercy of these often outdated and unreliable maps, even on their GPS devices. To counteract the effect of faceless control over this integral facet of social infrastructure, people are beginning to turn to one another to collaborate and remap the world for themselves. How do they doing this? The trifecta of mobile devices, wheels, and the power to revitalize maps into a dynamic, living subculture.

    The phenomena of crowdsourced GPS has given rise to an era of self-motivated cartographers, helping each other map out the world for for the good and safety of all-- in real time. But street maps are only the beginning. These pioneers of the wild web are laying the foundation for the future of crowd-sourced geography, where everyone's input is needed to keep maps alive.

    This will be a highly-engaging panel that will dive into uncharted territory to explain the innovation and importance of tapping the crowd to ensure a community-operated system of maps.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • Death of the Demo; Rise of Branded Tutorial

    by Joshua Rosenbaum

    Since the beginning of man, different permutations of the “Instruction Manual” have ridden as passenger in the sidecar of technology’s motorcycle. And like technology, the format of the instruction manual has evolved, but is the “science” behind them keeping up? Video demos may be the status quo across today’s interverse, BUT… The day of the 40-minute-long, boring video demo is over. Short, entertaining video tutorials are winning the attention and appreciation of a socially networked audience eager to pass along a link to something they find entertaining and useful. Smart brands are realizing the opportunity to create and use video tutorials as purveyors of brand culture. Injecting humor, style, and creative storytelling into an instructional tutorial not only can help grab and keep an audience’s attention, but may encourage the audience to actively promote the content to others purely based on its creativity or experiential value. Demos are dead. Fun, creative tutorials not only teach, but also promote. The branded tutorial is rapidly becoming the new, and necessary standard.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Iterate or Die: How Media Businesses Must Adapt

    by Kim-Mai Cutler

    In the past 15 years, the media and technology worlds have practically switched places. Tech companies have gone from needing to be 50,000+ employee behemoths to being teams of two guys that can ship products 1 million people love and that can change the world. All-powerful news organizations that used to support globe-trotting foreign correspondents reporting on human rights are now teams of 8-10 bloggers who must be glued to their computer screens at all times for a whiff or tweet of breaking news.

    Companies that leverage the content their users create like Facebook, Quora, Instagram and Twitter are getting better and better every year, while thinning profit margins are undermining the ability of paid media professionals to produce quality work.

    How should for-profit media companies evolve in an era when the audience has taken over the controls? What are the business models that media companies are using today and how are they changing? Which approach will you take?

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Creekside, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage slide deck

  • Lean UX: Getting Out of the Deliverables Business

    by Jeff Gothelf

    Traditionally UX has been a deliverables practice. Wireframes, sitemaps, flow diagrams, content inventories, taxonomies etc defined the practice of UX Designers (IxD, UX Design, whatever, etc). While this work has helped define what an UX Designers do and the value the work brings to a business, it has also put us in the deliverables business - measured and compensated for the depth and breadth of their deliverables (instead of the quality and success of the experiences they design). Enter Lean UX. Inspired by Lean Product and Agile development theories, Lean UX is the practice of bringing the true nature of our work to light faster, with less emphasis on deliverables and greater focus on the actual experience being designed. This talk will explore how Lean UX manifests in terms of process, communication, documentation and team interaction. In addition, we'll take a look at how this philosophical shift can take root in any environment from large corporation to interactive agencies to startups.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Marrying for Money: The ROI of Relationships

    by Jen van der Meer

    You CAN measure the ROI of relationships - personally, and professionally, and this seminar will show you how. No spreadsheets needed for this lecture, and only minimal algebra. Bring a cocktail napkin, a flair ink pen, and learn how to calculate the net present value of your future mate, your pet, or the 8,299 followers of your company's Twitter feed. Yet ROI alone will not tell you the ultimate value of your relationships. What other indicators do you need to be looking at to predict whether or not you, your future mate, your pet, or your followers will be happy with the relationship in the long run? Strong relationships depend on other factors - connection, a sense of fairness, health, humor, fun, the ability to learn and evolve together, and a sense of overall engagement with each other, and with life. At a more macro level, communities need to understand the equity they are building not just economically, but socially and environmentally as well. As the social graph reveals a huge volume of data about our actual relational behavior, we have an opportunity to pause for a moment: to consider the value system reflected in how we measure each other, ourselves, our relationships in the world. Participants will walk away not just with a clear and precise method for how to measure ROI, but also a holistic framework for measuring return on social behavior.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom F, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Reid Hoffman Presentation: Data as Web 3.0

    by Reid Hoffman

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

  • Sexy Dirty Data: Making Your Metrics Matter

    by Eric Doversberger, Wendy Levy, Pete Nicks and Gaby Brink

    What happens when the Director of the White House Office of Social Innovation, the Director of Programming of one of the countries leading media tech nonprofits, and a visionary data viz expert from Google get together?

    At this presentation, you'll hear down and dirty talk about the new IMPACT DASHBOARD from the people who built it: it's a super user-friendly cloud app with a Python backend that collects, hosts and visualizes your data in real time, right on your website and your phone. Imagine browser-based reporting with rich visuals and rich interactivity, no plug-in dependencies, and fully open source. No more dry reporting of metrics! No more measuring irrelevant data! No more boring spreadsheets that don't engage and inspire your audiences! This new interface is designed to help any artist or organization or company make a measurable difference in the world. And it's free. SXSW will be the launch of the US public Beta.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom C, Austin Convention Center

  • Building School 2.0: Creating the Schools We Need

    by Christian Leman

    SXSW explores the ways social media has profoundly changed nearly every facet of society from government to commerce to dating and friendship. Despite incredible societal change, K-12 education has remained largely unchanged. Every day, students leave their smartphones and laptops at the schoolhouse door. As a result, students, parents and teachers feel a powerful disconnect between the time students spend in school and the lives they live outside of it. If school is to remain a vital piece of young people's lives - and our society - it must evolve to help students thrive in our changing world.

    This is the notion behind School 2.0. But what will these new schools look like? What are the philosophical ideas that form it? How can we marry the best of what we know about teaching and learning with the use of 21st Century tools to create schools that are engaging, caring, and relevant places of learning for everyone involved? The story of the Science Leadership Academy, a progressive, inquiry-driven, project-based 1:1 laptop public high school will frame this presentation. Conceived as a partnership between the School District of Philadelphia and The Franklin Institute, SLA is considered to be one of the pioneers of the School 2.0 movement and has been recognized as an Apple Distinguished School in 2009 and 2010 and has been written about in many publications including the Philadelphia Inquirer, Edutopia Magazine and EdWeek.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Curb Your Experience: Pushing the UX to Extreme

    by Jenine Lurie

    “You have to start with the most complex, and find a simple solution. Then you have to make it work.” – IM Pei

    The critical path to excellent usability design begins with a fundamental understanding of how an application or interface is broken. In a variety of ways, UX designers take their cues from organizations like Consumer Reports which for example, use machines and robotics to repeatedly pound luggage to test for durability with the overall objective to try to make it rip, tear or break. UX engineers persistently attempt to ‘break’ the application, by often pushing it to its most extreme edges in order to find a solution for the fix. This presentation will extend beyond the physical design, Web or digital application interface and venture out into the world of human interactions and interpersonal communications, the original source where all interaction is based and inspired. The presentation will use video clips from the comedic series, Curb Your Enthusiasm, where Larry David, the protagonist of the show is shown to persistently test, provoke and extreme push society and conventional behavior to humorously illustrate where human interactions are broken and ways that they can or (why bother?) be fixed.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom B, Austin Convention Center

  • Score! How Sporting Events Have Advanced Broadcast Technology

    by Mark Taylor

    Millions of people all over the world watched this year's World Cup matches. For the first time, people flocked not just to bars or living rooms, but their desktop.

    Thanks to advances in broadcasting technology brought on in no small part by the sports broadcasting industry, viewers saw the action and could even begin to customize their viewing experience online in HD.
    Level 3 provided end-to-end support to broadcasters around world to help enable that event delivery from signal capture to consumption.

    What do events like this mean for the future of broadcasting? Have we reached a turning point for the mainstream adoption of live online events? What are technology partners and enablers like Level 3 doing to advance what's possible?

    From the Super Bowl to the Tour de France to the World Cup, major sporting events have been the catalyst for significant developments in broadcast technology. And along the way, Level 3 Communications has worked with these broadcasters to push the envelope of what's possible - from uncompressed HD to 3D delivery to iPhone streaming.

    Mark Taylor will discuss specific examples of how sports broadcasters and their technology partners have helped advance technology in broadcast delivery as well as the role Level 3 has played in the process each step of the way, working with broadcasters and content owners to push the boundaries of what's possible in event delivery.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In TX Ballroom 2-4, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Steve Krug Explains It All for You

    by Steve Krug

    Nowadays, Steve (Don’t Make Me Think) Krug is fixated on getting everyone to do their own usability testing. It’s almost sad, really. Bordering on an obsession. And it *would* be sad, except for the fact that usability testing turns out to be the best thing anyone can do to improve a Web site (or Web app, or desktop app, or iPad app—you get the idea) that they’re working on.

    Last year, he boiled down everything you need to know to do your own testing into 162 pages in his second book, Rocket Surgery Made Easy. Now, for people who haven’t got two hours to read a really short book (with lots of illustrations), he’s going to boil it down into a SxSW talk…complete with a live demonstration. You’ll leave the room ready—and eager--to start testing.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck