Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2011 about Entrepreneurship and Innovation

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Monday 14th March 2011

  • Business Model 101: How To Actually Make Money?

    by Andrew Marshall and Renee Hopkins

    The regular Thursday noon Innochat has become hugely popular on Twitter. As founder of Innochat, I propose a live session with a mixed panel of innovation experts and entrepreneurs in which we'll discuss business model theory and business model innovation and design as they pertain to specific start-ups and established companies. We will gather volunteers beforehand, entrepreneurs and representatives from existing companies who are willing to discuss their process of business model innovation and eager to get advice from the panel of Innochat experts.

    Business model innovation is a hot topic currently because entrepreneurs are discovering that without a clear picture of their business model success remains elusive. And established businesses facing threats are discovering that redesigning their business models may be the only thing that will save them. This topic is of particular interest at SXSW because many attendees are either startups or come from companies threatened by the rise of digital publishing of all kinds -- the music industry, print media, the film industry, and the software industry, in particular -- companies that critically need new business models to survive.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 14th March

    In Salon E, Hilton Austin Downtown

Tuesday 15th March 2011

  • How Governments are Changing Where Big Ideas Happen

    by Sean Kane, Tony Schum and Ian Kelso

    More than ever, governments across the world, at both national and local levels, are working hard to attract the "creative/digital industries". When you're looking for a job, you may not know how much your city, state or even national government often play a role in what companies are hiring in your community.

    While traditional economic development has typically meant a scenario like bringing a factory to a rural area, a newer practice involves growing so-called industries of the mind. Canada has led the way, but now many states across America are offering incentives to game developers and other tech-related companies (to say nothing of the massive internal investments by certain countries, such as Russia). The benefits can be tax breaks, loans, grants, tax credits and even free rent to get you and your brain trust to make the move.

    This discussion will look at why these sorts of incentives are thought to bring benefit to not just the companies, but to their communities and taxpayers, too.

    LEVEL: Beginner

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 15th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center