Sessions at FOSDEM 2012 with link on Sunday 5th February

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  • CoApp: Packaging Open Source software for Windows

    by Garrett Serack

    This presentation looks into the technical details of CoApp, a new fully-open source package management system providing all the tools to easily create, publish, discover, and install software packages, including automatically handling dependencies, managing updates and providing a frictionless end-user experience, all in a method that is well supported by the platform.

    At 10:00am to 10:50am, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • Voice Applications for the Modern Open Source Hacker

    by Ben Klang

    The Adhearsion project is an open source voice application development framework, the first of its kind in the open source world. By utilizing modern a modern, powerful and descriptive programming language, Ruby, and development practices like test-driven-development, Adhearsion allows developers to apply tools and skills they already have to this rich domain. During this talk, we will build and demonstrate several working voice applications.

    At 10:00am to 10:50am, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • Caching and tuning fun for high scalability

    by Wim Godden

    Caching has been a 'hot' topic for a few years. But caching takes more than merely taking data and putting it in a cache : the right caching techniques can improve performance and reduce load significantly. But we'll also look at some major pitfalls, showing that caching the wrong way can bring down your site. If you're looking for a clear explanation about various caching techniques and tools like Memcached, Nginx and Varnish, as well as ways to deploy them in an efficient way, this talk is for you. In this talk, we'll start from a Zend Framework (PHP) based site. We'll add caching, begin to add servers and replace the standard LAMP stack, all while performing live benchmarks.

    At 11:00am to 11:50am, Sunday 5th February

  • Internet of Threads

    by Renzo Davoli

    "Internet of Threads" gives a new perspective on the Internet. Each process, group of processes or even a single thread can be an Internet node, having its own ip address, QoS, routing etc. Virtual Distributed Ethernet, User mode IP stacks, partial virtual machines can make this change possible.

    At 11:00am to 11:50am, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • coreboot - The last frontier: Laptops

    by Carl-Daniel Hailfinger

    coreboot is a free firmware for x86 computers. It is designed as an extremely fast and lightweight alternative to BIOS and EFI (poweron to OS in <500 ms) while retaining the flexibility to boot any operating system. A few hundred desktop/server/embedded mainboards are supported, but supported laptops were unavailable in shops until now.

    The coreboot developers are proud to present the first working mainstream laptop here at FOSDEM. We'll tell you how we did it, and how you can enjoy coreboot on your hardware as well.

    At 12:00pm to 12:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • The Wild West of UNIX I/O, and how we might tame it

    by Anil Madhavapeddy

    This talk will firstly discuss the impossibility of using current APIs efficiently (via benchmarks on a diverse set of hardware (from many-core AMDs to the experimental Intel SCC). Finally, I will describe our work on introducing a hierarchical name system and extended socket API that adds support for automatic transport selection and reconfigurable sockets. This permits many NUMA-related optimisations on single hosts, for VMs to switch to shared memory communication if on the same physical host, and for seamless network-wide protocol upgrades to multi path TCP or TCPcrypt.

    At 12:00pm to 12:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage video link

  • A strategy for managing diverse equipment in the CERN controls group

    by Juan David Gonzalez Cobas and Javier Serrano

    The “White-Rabbit” timing project is open and addresses the future timing and synchronization needs for CERN and other laboratories. White-rabbit makes use of synchronous Ethernet and uses ideas from IEEE 1588 PTP protocol to synchronize remote equipment up to 10Km apart to better than one nanosecond.

    At 1:00pm to 1:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • Bringing monitoring into the 21st century: How to predict problems before they arise

    by Soren Hansen

    We stumbled upon ancient (circa 1960) scrolls of wisdom in the field of statistics and applied it to modern day monitoring systems. The result is a monitoring system that detects anomalies instead of relying on statically defined thresholds as well as predicts failures long before they become problems.

    At 1:00pm to 1:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • Implementing Domain-Specific Languages with LLVM

    by David Chisnall

    At 2:00pm to 2:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • Why the community should welcome Average Jane and Joe

    by Clarista

    Clarissa would like to convince "geeks" that they need "normal people". She wants to convince geeks about what an Average Jane or Joe can bring to FLOSS, because she wants geeks to make some efforts to welcome them.

    Indeed, it has been quite difficult for her to enter the community. Difficult, but not impossible! And now, she simply loves FLOSS. So she'd like to explain how Mozillians managed to catch her attention. And which kind of contributions geeks can propose to "normal people" to attract them, and to keep them in the community... You'll see that Average Jane or Joe can be useful ;-)

    She thinks geeks need Average Jane or Joe to understand what the public really wants or needs. It's the only way to really open up the Web!

    So throughout this talk, she will explain what you can do to attract "normal people".

    At 2:00pm to 2:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • The Apache Cassandra storage engine

    by Sylvain Lebresne

    At 3:00pm to 3:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • You're doing it wrong! Or how to really grow a community

    by Bryan Østergaard

    Based on his experiences with aggressively growing and maintaining the Exherbo community Bryan dives into the secrets and experience leading to this success.

    At 3:00pm to 3:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • Caret and Stick: How to motivate your developers and create a healthy community

    by Finne Boonen

    You've got the program, you've got the users but how do you make sure your community thrives? An introduction to the research on open source communities when they get more complicated then 2 developers on Github.

    At 4:00pm to 4:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link

  • From Dev to DevOps

    by Carlos Sanchez

    If you are a developer interested on the DevOps movement, you can implement end-to-end development-to-production process taking advantage of Apache Maven and Puppet, to automate continuous delivery, from source code to any number of application servers managed with Puppet.

    The DevOps movement aims to improve communication between developers and operations teams to solve critical issues such as fear of change and risky deployments. But the same way that Agile development would likely fail without continuous integration tools, the DevOps principles need tools to make them real, and provide the automation required to actually be implemented. Most of the so called DevOps tools focus on the operations side, and there should be more than that, the automation must cover the full process, Dev to QA to Ops and be as automated and agile as possible. Tools in each part of the workflow have evolved in their own silos, and with the support of their own target teams. But a true DevOps mentality requires a seamless process from the start of development to the end in production deployments and maintenance, and for a process to be successful there must be tools that take the burden out of humans.

    Apache Maven has arguably been the most successful tool for development, project standardization and automation introduced in the last years. On the operations side we have open source tools like Puppet or Chef that are becoming increasingly popular to automate infrastructure maintenance and server provisioning.

    In this presentation we will introduce an end-to-end development-to-production process that will take advantage of Maven and Puppet, each of them at their strong points, and open source tools to automate the handover between them, automating continuous build and deployment, continuous delivery, from source code to any number of application servers managed with Puppet, running either in physical hardware or the cloud, handling new continuous integration builds and releases automatically through several stages and environments such as development, QA, and production.

    At 4:00pm to 4:50pm, Sunday 5th February

  • Freedom, Out of the Box! Update on activites at the FreedomBox Foundation

    by bdalegarbee

    At 5:00pm to 5:50pm, Sunday 5th February

    Coverage link