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IA Summit 2012 schedule

Wednesday 21st March 2012

  • Designing with Agile: Fast and Effective UX Methods That Work

    by Anders Ramsay

    Agile represents a huge shift from waterfall and other traditional approaches to software development, and UX practitioners have realized they need to adapt their traditional methods accordingly. In this intensive half-day workshop, you’ll learn both how to be a successful UX practitioner within an Agile team, and how to improve your own UX methodology, even if you’re not in an Agile environment, through Agile practices.

    This workshop will simulate key points of a UX practitioner's journey through an Agile project. We’ll divide into teams and work in mini-versions of Agile work environments. In our ""team rooms,"" we'll explore project activities that both reveal Agile thinking and offer practical value that you can apply when returning to your real-world projects and challenges. Activities and topics will include Agile research with Paired Interviews, an Agile approach to Personas, intensive collaborative ideation and rapid user interface design with Design Studio, the UX of User Stories, working in Sprints, and an Agile approach to User Testing.

    Activities will be interspersed with group discussion. Time allowing, we’ll conclude the day by conducting a Retrospective (an important Agile practice) during which participants reflect on the project journey and share insights.

    At 8:30am to 12:30pm, Wednesday 21st March

    Coverage slide deck

  • The Quest for Emotional Engagement: Information Visualization

    by Stephen Anderson

    Ready access to information is great. But many times there is too much information, too much data, or too many options to make sense of. People can easily become frustrated or disengage if they can’t connect with what is presented to them.

    Stephen Anderson, designer and creator of the Mental Notes card deck, believes that people must be emotionally engaged if you want them to exhibit a certain behavior. In this workshop, Stephen will share the process he uses to create simple visual representations to help people make informed choices and understand complex information.

    In brief, design patterns such as spreadsheets, lists, dashboards and grid views suffice for getting data onto a screen. However, when it comes to making sense of this data, these same patterns hold us back from designing great experiences; generic patterns are poor substitutes for a good custom visualization, especially one designed for the content being displayed. Stephen will share with you many examples of such visualizations, and the process used to design each.

    Topics will include:

    How to construct interactive models that make sense of complex information
    Basic graphic design skills that can used by anyone (and how to avoid simply “dressing up data”)
    The challenges of visualizing dynamic information, and how this differs from data visualizations and infographics
    How to use metaphor and story to make sense of complex information
    The neuroscience behind perception and judgement
    And much more!
    Examples cover a variety of topic areas, such as: Health Insurance plans, medical charts, eCommerce search results, flight times, sales and CRM data, mobile phone bills, recipes, pirated movies, academic research, shopping lists and so on.

    In addition to the many numerous information visualization examples, most of which will be new to attendees, there will be multiple hands-on exercises where you will practice the skills being taught.

    Information is ripe for a makeover. This workshop will show you useful & engaging ways to present information.

    And no graphic design skills are required!

    At 8:30am to 12:30pm, Wednesday 21st March

  • Design for Cross-Channel Experiences

    by Peter Morville and samantha starmer

    The gap between physical and digital has blurred. We buy a Wii to get in shape. We read books and newspapers on Kindles. We unlock car doors with iPhones that double as GPS navigation devices. And, we order online for in-store pickup. Increasingly, people expect to be able to interact with products and services when and where and how they want — and that’s not always on your website.

    The future of design is everywhere. Customer journeys encompass a growing array of physical and digital touchpoints. In response, user experience practitioners must design for holistic, integrated experiences that bridge multiple platforms, channels, and devices.

    In this interactive workshop, Peter and Samantha will provide specific tools and recommendations for designing for the full experience lifecycle across channels and touchpoints. Topics covered will include:

    Why we must design beyond digital
    Major elements of a seamless cross-channel experience
    The future of ubiquitous computing and "the Intertwingularity"
    Mapping physical, digital, intellectual, and social space
    Practical methods for designing multiple interaction touchpoints across channels and devices
    How to apply "IA Thinking" to improve both product and process
    You will leave the day ready to integrate cross-channel design techniques into your toolkit, ensuring a more holistic and satisfying experience for your users and customers regardless of where they are interacting.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Wednesday 21st March

    Coverage slide deck

  • Designing Social Experiences

    by erin and christian crumlish

    Designing for social interaction is hard. People are unpredictable, consistency is a mixed blessing, and co-creation with your users requires a dizzying flirtation with loss of control. We will present the dos and don’ts of social web design using a sampling of interaction patterns, design principles and best practices to help you improve the design of your digital social environments.

    Designing social websites and applications, or adding a social dimension to an existing project, entails unique challenges way beyond those involved in creating experiences for individuals interacting alone with an interface. Any of the following sound familiar?

    I’m a designer being asked to add “social” or “gamification” to my site!
    I have an active community on my site but people are misbehaving. How can I get that under control?
    We want to build a really cool social experience around [thingy] but we’re not sure how to get people to come join the fun.
    I have a great idea for a social utility but I don’t want to have to first re-create the social infrastructure of the web inside of it.
    People come and read my content, but they’re invisible to each other. How can I peel away the layers so they can participate with each other?
    I’m worried I’m missing an opportunity to help my members connect with each other in the real world.
    I need to design a mobile companion to our site and it need to be more social. Where do I start?
    In this workshop, we’ll address these challenges and more. You’ll explore the landscape of social user experience design patterns and anti-patterns, focusing on the contexts in which specific interface designs work well and the unintended consequences that make some UI ideas seem like a good idea until they turn around and bite you in your app.

    Starting with a foundational set of high-level practices that underpin the individual interaction, Erin and Christian will present rules and tips for how to mix-and-match the individual social patterns and best practices to create compelling social experiences. Workshop activities will involve group discussions and sketching to explore the application of social interaction patterns to specific scenarios.

    Who is this workshop for?
    Designers, developers, architects and product specialists all need to work together to create compelling social experiences online and this workshop will be relevant to anyone who has to plan, design, build, or bring to market social websites and applications.
    What will you learn?
    By the end of this very full day you will be able to:

    understand, visualize, and communicate clearly about the social design landscape
    apply a set of core social design principles to a wide variety of contexts
    create models for the representation of people and social objects in your app
    add social features intelligently (and incrementally) to an existing site
    design reputation features to enable the type of community (competitive? collaborative? somewhere in between?) you want
    enable sharing and engage organic word-of-mouth growth to launch your project
    embrace openness and leverage the existing open social infrastructure of the web
    introduce representations of presence into an experience so that your users can find and relate to each other
    tie your virtual experiences to the real world in space and time by connecting to maps, geolocation, and calendaring tools
    figure out an enterprise social media strategy for your client, boss, or startup

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Wednesday 21st March

  • HTML for Designers

    by Matt Nish-Lapidus and Matthew Milan

    Join Matt Nish-Lapidus and Matthew Milan from Normative Design for a full day of getting your hands dirty in the world of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Learn how to hack the web for fun a profit - make prototypes, experiments, and learn how to bring your designs to life.

    During this hands-on full day workshop you will learn the foundation of HTML (semantics, structure, techniques, and uses), how to make it pretty with CSS, and how to add rich interactions with Javascript. Although we won't focus specifically on prototyping, learning how the web works will give you the tools you need to prototype, collaborate with developers, make better wireframes, and explore your designs in a way you never thought possible.

    Please bring your own laptop and install a text editor of your choice (we recommend TextMate, TextWrangler, or Coda).

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Wednesday 21st March

  • Information Architecture: Theory and Practice

    by Donna Spencer

    Information architecture is all about organising information and providing methods for people to find and use it, usually via navigation. It relates primarily to websites, web applications, intranets, file and document management systems.

    The workshop
    This full day workshop will provide you with a thorough overview and understanding of information architecture theory & practice. It will cover a wide range of IA issues, including an understanding of how it fits into a project, fundamental skills & knowledge required for IA work and current IA issues. It will be theoretical and practical and allow you to immediately apply ideas to your projects.

    During the workshop, you’ll learn:

    What information architecture is and how it relates to other user experience disciplines
    Core IA techniques – analysing content, conducting user research, card sorting and more
    Core IA theories – classification, categorisation, metadata & labelling
    IA patterns – structures for different types of sites
    Designing navigation & page layouts
    Putting it together in an IA project
    Current issues in IA
    At the end of the workshop, you will understand:

    How to design sites that help users find what they want
    What organisational scheme or schemes are best for your content
    How to conduct user research that helps develop your information architecture
    How to conduct a card sorting exercise
    How core IA theories, such as metadata, classification, and categorisation affect your site’s success
    How to conduct a content analysis and develop a solid IA structure
    How to design effective navigation and page layouts
    The workshop will combine discussion, questions and hands-on activities. Extensive notes and resources will be provided for further personal exploration.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Wednesday 21st March

  • Tapworthy iPad Design

    by Josh Clark

    Discover the practical techniques and fresh perspective required to design exceptional apps on Apple's groundbreaking tablet. From first concept to polished pixel, learn to create an iPad app that delights. In this full-day workshop, designer Josh Clark, author of "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps," explores the context, ergonomics, visual design, and brand-new interaction models that make designing for iPad at once so challenging and so promising.

    Who it's for:
    This workshop isn't (only) for geeks. The workshop's interdisciplinary approach is appropriate for everyone involved in the iPad design process: designers, programmers, managers, marketers, clients. The workshop takes a hands-on approach to intermediate and advanced design concepts but requires no specific technical know-how. Experienced designers and newcomers alike will uncover the shifts in mindset and technique required to craft a great iPad app.

    What you'll learn:
    The workshop will equip you to ask the right questions (and find the right answers) to make aesthetic, technical, and usability decisions that will make your apps a pleasure to use. You'll learn:

    The key elements of the tablet mindset and what your audience expects of your app
    What's different vs phone or desktop interfaces
    The ergonomic demands of designing for tablets
    Managing metaphor: the opportunities and missteps of realism in interfaces
    How to work with gestures
    The new opportunities of multitouch interaction
    How to help people explore interfaces without buttons, menus or other traditional interface "chrome"

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Wednesday 21st March

  • Visual Design 101

    by Mark Boulton

    Visual design is not magic, or the result of some God-given talent, but the result of applying rules, techniques and practice.

    Mark’s workshop will cover the basics of visual design. From collaborative idea generation and visualising ideas, to the fundamentals of typography, grid design, composition and colour theory. Good visual design is like good jazz; it’s about having the chops to improvise around the constraints. That’s what this workshop will do: it will give you the chops. All you will need to do afterwards, is practice.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Wednesday 21st March

  • Content Strategy and UX

    by Kristina Halvorson

    Content is often the #1 reason people come to your website. But content is hard to deal with, which means it often doesn't turn out the way we'd quite planned. That's not good, because ultimately, it's impossible to design a good user experience for bad content.

    When you introduce content strategy into your UX design process, you'll have tools to tackle tough content problems, right from the start of your design proces.

    In this workshop, Kristina will show you how to put three powerful CS tools to work for your UX projects. You'll learn how to:

    Create a useful, usable content inventory
    Ensure your page structure effectively communicates your message
    Build an editorial calendar that people will actually use

    At 1:30pm to 5:30pm, Wednesday 21st March

Thursday 22nd March 2012

  • Architecting Search-Engine Friendly Websites and Intranets

    by sharithurow

    Search engine optimization (SEO) is optimizing a website or intranet for people who use search engines. In reality, search-engine friendliness is a critical component of overall findability. The human aspect of searching is just as important as the technical aspect of searching…and often the missing findability ingredient.

    As Peter Morville states in his book Ambient Findability, “Findability precedes usability. In the alphabet and on the Web. You can’t use what you can’t find.” Users should be able to locate and discover desired content via browsing and searching. Believe it or not, a usable and consistent information architecture that communicates aboutness, information scent, and sense-of-place actually makes a website and intranet more search- engine friendly. Site search results are more accurate, and your website is more likely to be displayed well on the commercial Web search engines. And not only your Web pages – videos, graphic images, blogs, and PDFs – can also achieve relevant search engine visibility.

    In this full-day workshop, Shari will show you how to architect a website that makes your content easier to find via internal search engines and the commercial Web search engines in a way that enhances the user experience.

    Bring examples of websites and intranet pages: this is a hands-on session with plenty of what- not-to-dos and exercises.

    After attending this workshop, you will be able to:

    Architect a website that satisfies both your site’s visitors AND search engines
    Create and maintain a successful information architecture – learn what Web search engine optimizers don’t know
    Use a variety of keyword research tools for usability testing wireframes and prototypes
    Understand the role of keywords in site navigation and page interlinking
    Types of page interlinking that are necessary for search engine visibility
    Effectively place targeted keywords and links on Web pages, graphic image and video files without sacrificing a positive user experience
    Avoid common (and costly) architecture, navigation, and design mistakes Implement proven techniques and strategies for long-term results

    At 8:30am to 12:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • Better Process by Design

    by Jeff Gothelf and Kevin M. Hoffman

    Process is the backbone of a successful organization yet in many companies process is inherited, modified with anecdotal insight, and unchanging for a long time. The way a team works together and with clients will ultimately determine the quality of the products and experiences they create. Process can and should be designed to align for your organization and the task at hand. This workshop will teach you why process is important, how to define the process needs of your team, and how to design and implement the processes that maximize the potential of the team and the design challenge at hand.

    This empowering workshop will teach participants how to take control of their work environment and create a core process backbone and variations, resulting greater flexibility and more successful outcomes. The tools used in IA and design in general these days can be applied well beyond products and software. We want to teach attendees of the summit how to do that and, in turn, improve their contribution to their organizations.

    Some information architects struggle to make the type of impact they know they’re capable of making. By applying their existing skills to process design, they can begin to create an work culture is much more responsive, innovative, and effective. Regardless of the channel they are working in, these ideas will increase the value that IA’s bring to their organizations. It will also seamlessly compliment attendees of Kevin’s other workshop, Better Meetings by Design.

    At 8:30am to 12:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • Remote UX Research

    by nate bolt

    Nate Bolt, El Presidente of Bolt | Peters, will be joining us to talk about his book Remote Research. Nate has overseen hundreds of remote user research studies for Sony, Oracle, HP, Greenpeace, Electronic Arts, and others. Beginning in 2003, he led the creation of the first moderated remote user research software, Ethnio, which is being used around the world to recruit hundreds of thousands of live participants for research.

    At 8:30am to 12:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

    Coverage slide deck

  • Information Architecture: Theory and Practice

    by Donna Spencer

    Information architecture is all about organising information and providing methods for people to find and use it, usually via navigation. It relates primarily to websites, web applications, intranets, file and document management systems.

    The workshop
    This full day workshop will provide you with a thorough overview and understanding of information architecture theory & practice. It will cover a wide range of IA issues, including an understanding of how it fits into a project, fundamental skills & knowledge required for IA work and current IA issues. It will be theoretical and practical and allow you to immediately apply ideas to your projects.

    During the workshop, you’ll learn:

    • What information architecture is and how it relates to other user experience disciplines
    • Core IA techniques – analysing content, conducting user research, card sorting and more
    • Core IA theories – classification, categorization, metadata & labeling
    • IA patterns – structures for different types of sites
    • Designing navigation & page layouts
    • Putting it together in an IA project
    • Current issues in IA

    At the end of the workshop, you will understand:

    • How to design sites that help users find what they want
    • What organisational scheme or schemes are best for your content
    • How to conduct user research that helps develop your information architecture
    • How to conduct a card sorting exercise
    • How core IA theories, such as metadata, classification, and categorisation affect your site’s success
    • How to conduct a content analysis and develop a solid IA structure
    • How to design effective navigation and page layouts

    The workshop will combine discussion, questions and hands-on activities. Extensive notes and resources will be provided for further personal exploration.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • Strategic User Experience

    by Leisa Reichelt

    Familiar with the expression 'lipstick on a pig'?

    Too many of us find ourselves frustratedly 'applying' User Experience to products that don't make sense, in organisations who don't really understand how we work and how they can make best use of us.

    In this workshop we're going to explore how we can make sure that the products we work on are underpinned by sound, customer centred strategies that are aligned with your design strategies.

    What does it mean to get involved with Strategic User Experience?

    Understanding the experience that your users have beyond their interaction with the interface you're designing, across all medium, throughout the lifecycle of their engagement.
    Being proactively involved in shaping the product or service offering, working with disciplines across the organisation.
    Becoming fluent in the languages and practices of both User Experience & Business people, becoming a translator and facilitator for both of these groups.
    Developing some new techniques, and re-framing some existing UX techniques to help explore and communicate the strategic business opportunities that can be generated through a better understanding of our customers/end users.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • Career Workshop

    by Amanda Schonfeld and Russ U

    The Career Workshop is a half-day event that teaches attendees how to optimize their career search. Attendees will learn the skills needed to be successfully competitive in today’s job market, and will get the opportunity to network and share ideas.

    Divided into four information-packed sessions, the workshop will include open discussions and individual and team exercises:

    Preparing for Your Job Search Search
    Should you begin a job search? How to weigh your options
    Using careers sites and networking to determine what employers are currently looking for
    Communicating what IAs do, to recruiters
    How to work well with agency recruiters and/or corporate recruiters
    Applying lessons learned to cover letters and interview conversations
    The Wrath of the Resume
    The good, the bad and the ugly
    Updating your resume to get the attention of those seeking UX-related talent
    Group exercise: Resume Critique Studio (Positives & Deltas)
    Show ‘em Your Goods: Professional Handling of Your Portfolio
    Understanding what makes a great portfolio
    Determining the best method to present it
    Group exercise: Portfolio Critique Studio (Positives & Deltas)
    Face to Face: The Interview
    Communication tips for before, during and after the interview
    The Standards: Questions you need to have answers for
    Examining what interviewers want to hear
    Presenting yourself through your portfolio
    Show & Tell: Interview Disasters
    Group exercise: Live Interview Role Play (with a Real Recruiter Who Might Want to Hire You!)

    At 1:30pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

    Coverage slide deck

  • Leveraging Taxonomy for Cross-Channel Content Management

    by Seth Earley

    Cross-channel content delivery can add complexity and cost to content management. This workshop discusses best-practice approaches to ensuring that the most valuable content is channeled appropriately to each targeted channel. Attendees will learn how to leverage taxonomy and metadata management to simplify content management and content distribution and presentation applications.

    At 1:30pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • Making sense of the data: Collaborative data analysis techniques

    by Dana Chisnell

    Observing users working with your design is enlightening! Imagine, you’ve just come back from watching people use a prototype. You and your team had some “ah-ha” moments when users did something you hadn’t expected. Now, you have a growing list of things you could change. How do you know where to start?

    Your team learned during the sessions. You collected oodles of data, now what do you do with it? How do you make smart design decisions from what you learned?

    Dana Chisnell, co-author of seminal Handbook of Usability Testing, will show you how to quickly assess what you’ve learned and zoom in on the important findings. Dana will walk you through collaborative techniques for organizing everything your team observed. You’ll learn practical methods to pare the observations down to priority issues quickly and effectively, and then work with your team to solve the right design problems the right way.

    Dana will get you on your feet as she shows you how to:

    Identify patterns from your users’ behaviors that will inspire innovative design ideas
    Prioritize the most important issues in under an hour
    Test your team’s inferences through a proven technique that ensures the right design direction
    Avoid writing lengthy reports that no one ever reads—get results instead!
    Everyone who wants faster methods for getting to the meat of their user research findings will love this workshop.

    At 1:30pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • UX Leadership Skills: Managing Conflict on Design Projects

    by Dan B.

    Design thrives on conflict

    Design work is fraught with conflict. Some is good, moving the project forward, and some is bad, stalling progress. Either way, most designers find themselves ill-equipped to deal with the variety of conflicts that arise. They lack the skills necessary to ensure their conflicts aren't caustic and counter-productive.

    Situations, Patterns, and Traits
    I've been working to define the Situations we face, the behavior Patterns we can use to address those situations, and designers' Traits that may lead to conflict. Situations describe scenarios typical to the design process. Patterns are techniques we can apply to situations. Like the patterns that have emerged to aid interface design, these techniques are starting points for redirecting conversations to be more productive. Traits are behaviors or preferences exhibited by designers. This framework attempts to take some conflict management concepts and render it in a practical language that's meaningful for designers.

    Some examples:
    Situation: Lack of engagement
    Some members of the project team are not as engaged in the design process. Because everyone has a role to play, lackluster participation can have major impacts on progress. Team members may not be doing the tasks assigned to them. Or stakeholders may not be paying attention to the project and unable to provide constructive feedback on design work.

    Pattern: Pick your battles
    Designers should weigh the level of effort in trying to "win" a difficult situation against the actual effect of that outcome and the larger effort of the project. Compromise in the near-term may open possibilities for more significant challenges later on.

    Trait: Operating independently
    Designers are faced with situations where other members of the team are not engaged or where project parameters are poorly defined. Designers should understand whether they can be productive in situations where they lack of a complete set of inputs, where they don't get regular feedback from clients, or where they're forced to plan their own time.

    In this workshop, we'll explore a dozen situations typically faced by designers on their projects and discuss techniques for redirecting the conflict. We'll play some games to practice selecting the appropriate technique. We'll discuss the difference between good (productive) conflict and bad (stalling) conflict. We'll talk about how to integrate these skills into your professional development and what to look for in other people that will help with managing them.

    At 1:30pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • 1st Timers Orientation Session

    At 4:30pm to 5:30pm, Thursday 22nd March

  • Opening Reception

    At 6:00pm to 8:00pm, Thursday 22nd March

Friday 23rd March 2012

  • Opening Keynote - Experience Across Channels: A Conversation

    by Shelley Evenson, Dave Gray and Ben Reason

    The Summit kicks off with a lively conversation that explores the boundaries, possibilities, opportunities and practicalities of designing for experience across channels. Dave Gray, founder of XPLANE and now SVP of Strategy for Dachis Group will host the conversation. Joining Dave on stage will be cross-channel experts Shelley Evenson, long-time service design educator and now research manager at Facebook, and Ben Reason, Director at live|work, a pioneering service design firm. In an active, insightful discussion these three innovators will explore what it means to the IA and UX communities to design across channels. They will share the opportunities that are out there, how to get involved, and how you can benefit from cross-channel thinking in your everyday work.

    At 9:00am to 10:00am, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire I, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • Adapting Ourselves to Adaptive Content

    by Karen McGrane

    For years, we've been telling designers: the web is not print. You can't have pixel-perfect layouts. You can't determine how your site will look in every browser, on every platform, on every device. We taught designers to cede control, think in systems, embrace web standards. So why are we still letting content authors plan for where their content will "live" on a web page? Why do we give in when they demand a WYSIWYG text editor that works "just like Microsoft Word"? Worst of all, why do we waste time and money creating and recreating content instead of planning for content reuse? What worked for the desktop web simply won't work for mobile. As our design and development processes evolve, our content workflow has to keep up. Karen will talk about how we have to adapt to creating more flexible content.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire III, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • The Information Architecture of Emergency Response

    by Noreen Whysel

    We will explore the evolution of technology in emergency response, with a special focus on advances in geographic systems, incident management, social media and policy in New York City since September 11, 2001. What technologies do emergency responders in NYC use? How have events like 9/11 and other incidents influenced technology advances? What effect, if any, has the change from a Law Enforcement Mayor to a Media Mayor had on data policy? What are the challenges and opportunities of open government data? How is social media being used in NYC and elsewhere to engage the public in emergency preparedness and response? And, finally, are app contests and hackathons an effective way to improve public services in difficult economic times? The session will conclude with a Town Hall discussion of how the IA community can support emergency response efforts throughout each of our own neighborhoods.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire I, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • Integrating UX and Agile: Designer and Scrum Master Perspectives

    by Mike Leftwich and Dorelle Rabinowitz

    Designers, IAs – want to really know what your Agile team members think about UX? Want to know how to truly be on the team, how to work smoothly within the Agile process, and how to leverage Agile to make your work more effective?

    Dorelle and Mike have partnered on multiple Agile teams, translating a desktop product into both mobile and tablet channels. Based on their experience together (as a UX designer and a software engineer/ScrumMaster) they will give their perspectives on how to effectively integrate UX design practices into an agile team. This is a practical session with real-world examples of both successes and challenges. They will tell you what’s worked well and what hasn’t, and how they’re continually adapting their processes as the team grows and changes. This session is a chance for UXers to learn about effective Agile and UX from an engineering perspective.

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire II, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • More than media queries: What you need to bring your sites to all devices

    by John Yuda

    Responsive web design has been the hot topic of 2011, but the discussion has focused on displaying content on different size screens, from mobile to desktop. This is important, but it is only part of the story.

    We need to design for a wide range of device capabilities:

    a range of screen sizes
    varying input types (keyboard and mouse, touch, etc)
    unpredictable network speeds

    And in the next few years, we'll also have to consider:

    voice-based input and output (like Siri)
    gesture-based input (like Microsoft's Kinect)
    very large displays

    Learn how accessibility techniques like ARIA, HTML5 and other developing technologies help us tackle these problems right away, as well as preparing us for unknown devices in the future.

    At 11:30am to 11:50am, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire III, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • Rhythm and Flow

    by Peter Stahl

    Most interactions have an underlying rhythm. For example, an application may ask you to scan a list of items, then click one, leading to another list to scan and click. Scan, click, scan, click. You can get into a groove. Systems increasingly have rhythm too: animated transitions, hover responses, and digital physics. Static is so last year. But sometimes it's wise to break rhythm. And besides, rhythm alone isn't enough. The best experiences induce a state of "flow," during which users get into such a groove that mechanics disappear, time falls away, and the experience itself becomes intrinsically rewarding. (Wouldn't that be awesome?) Designers own rhythm. Yet our work practice lacks appropriate tools and vocabulary. How do you portray a groove in a wireframe or PowerPoint deck? Examples from other fields can help. We'll see how it's done in animation and movies, game systems, music and choreography.

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire I, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • Networking on the Introvert's side of the Room

    by Michele Marut

    These days, networking is essential. It's how employers fill 70 percent of their job openings, and well-connected UX professionals earn higher incomes.

    But with most networking activities geared towards extroverts, what are Introverts—who often find being around other people draining—to do?

    It turns out that many characteristics that define an introvert also make them wonderful networkers. Introverts are comfortable making one-on-one connections, they know how to develop meaningful relationships and they're excellent listeners. Introverts just need to align their networking activities with their innate strengths.

    In this session, I'll share the tools that have enabled me to grow my network without changing my introverted personality. If you're intimidated by our extroverted world, this session will guide you toward your own networking success.

    This talk will help UX professionals:

    1. leverage existing communication skills that work well for an introvert
    2. learn how to choose appropriate networking events
    3. maintain the network by focusing on helping others

    At 11:55am to 12:15pm, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire III, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • Driving a Multichannel Experience from a Single Message

    by Margot Bloomstein

    E pluribus unum? Better yet, out of one, create many—many channels within a multifaceted but unified experience. That’s the challenge of experience design among constrained budgets, tight timelines, and unlimited interaction expectations. Content strategy’s communication foundation, the message architecture, can help you answer that challenge. First, we’ll discuss how to prioritize communication goals and develop a message architecture with a hands-on exercise—ideal whether you’re designing for the web, a mobile app, social media, or an offline experience. Then learn how to create consistency between long-form web copy, action-oriented forms, and pointed Tweets. Discover how to prioritize features and content types across platforms by looking at examples that do this well, and those that don’t. Finally, respond to responsive design with a strategy to adapt content across platforms but still stay true to the brand.

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire I, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck

  • IA Show & Tell

    by Chris Avore

    Share your prototypes, screen design, sketches or anything else with some of the globe’s finest and motivated participants in the interaction design community to get useful, implementable feedback or to show unique solutions to potentially common design problems.

    We’ll have a round-table discussion where one person tells the group if they need help with a design problem, or if they are sharing a unique solution that’s worked well for them in the past.

    Questions and dialogue from the rest of the group are expected and encouraged.

    Sharing is not mandatory at all; drafts, incomplete work, or past projects are welcome. Time will also be available to discuss how to host UX Show and Tell events in your local design community.

    At 1:45pm to 3:30pm, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire IV, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

  • Orchestrate against atomism

    by Patrick T Quattlebaum

    Brands large and small are placing increased importance on delivering a seamless, cross-channel customer experience. But most corporations struggle to define and communicate internally one vision for the experience and to coordinate design and implementation activities across the organization to realize that vision. The result: a customer experience that is the sum of its disjointed parts rather than a meaningful whole.

    In this talk, I will explore this phenomenon and share the following:

    • An overview of common organizational and cultural dynamics that make holistic customer experience design challenging
    • The importance of building relationships inside of the enterprise to create seamless, cross-channel customer experiences
    • Methods from or inspired by service design, film production, gamestorming, and consulting that I have experimented with (successfully and unsuccessfully) to orchestrate cross-functional teams
    • A challenge to architects and designers to facilitate cross-functional collaboration and integrated planning.

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Friday 23rd March

    In Empire III, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

    Coverage slide deck