Internet Librarian International 2012 schedule

Tuesday 30th October 2012

  • Keynote: Stop lending and start sharing

    by R. David Lankes

    R. David Lankes, Syracuse University School of Information Studies Director, Information Institute of Syracuse

    David Lankes is a passionate advocate for libraries, librarians and their essential role in today’s society. In this keynote, he argues that the future of libraries is not in our collections or a building, but in our relationships with those we serve. Libraries are knowledge hubs that bring together the wisdom of the community, and share it with the world. This is more than just a rhetorical shift; it has real implications for how libraries organise themselves and how they use technology.

    At 9:00am to 10:15am, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A101 - Future technology: stay ahead, stay agile

    by Marydee Ojala, Brian Kelly and Rurik Greenall

    Track A - Rethinking Technology

    A101 - Future technology: stay ahead, stay agile

    Moderator: Rurik Thomas Greenall, NTNU

    Making Sense of the Future
    Brian Kelly, UKOLN University of Bath

    Rebooting search and reinvigorating searchers
    Marydee Ojala, ONLINE Magazine

    What is happening on the technology front line and how should libraries predict and plan for technological developments? When it comes to future planning, how can libraries identify the ‘weak signals’ which may indicate possible significant changes? What changes do information professionals need to make in their approach to research and what new skills, techniques, resources and tools should they adopt in order to remain agile?

    At 10:45am to 11:30am, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B101 - Future planning and new models

    by Rebecca Cadwallader, Victor Henning, Donna Saxby and Liz McGettigan

    Track B - Rethinking Service Innovation

    B101 - Future planning and new models

    Moderator: Donna Saxby, Kingham Hill School
    It's time for the future
    Liz McGettigan, City of Edinburgh City Council ACMI, MCILIP
    Innovation and the Library of Birmingham
    Rebecca Cadwallader, Library of Birmingham
    Delivering research productivity and real-time metrics to your library
    Victor Henning, Mendeley presenting in conjunction with Swets

    Even at a time of economic pressure, public libraries are delivering real innovation and creativity. Edinburgh’s Library and Information Service is delivering a new model for libraries across the city, based on a strategic approach which borrows from the retail sector to deliver ‘next generation library and information services’. The new Library of Birmingham, opening in summer 2013, is developing a number of innovative projects, including the MAGMA metadata project, a gaming app and collaboration with local digital SMEs. Both projects have lessons to share with librarians from all sectors.

    At 10:45am to 11:30am, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • C101 - Social media strategies and policies

    by Wilma van den Brink, Michael Stephens, Kitty Berteling and Åke Nygren

    Track C - Rethinking Connections

    C101 - Social media strategies and policies

    Moderator: Michael Stephens, San Jose State University & Tame the Web
    How to step out of the library bubble using social media
    Åke Nygren, Digital Services, Stockholm Public Libraries
    Online connecting librarians
    Wilma van den Brink, Library, Hogeschool van Amsterdam / University of Applied Sciences Amsterdam
    Kitty Berteling, Hogeschool van Amsterdam

    The social media landscape continues to evolve. Does your library have a social media strategy that can help you step outside the library bubble? By using such tools as Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, libraries can promote their services and products and bond with their patrons. This session will include practical examples of how librarians are using these platforms and the latest research on social media policies.

    At 10:45am to 11:30am, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

    Coverage slide deck

  • A102 - Working with developers

    by Stephanie Taylor, Dave Pattern, Richard Burkitt and Tony Hirst

    Track A - Rethinking Technology

    A102 - Working with developers
    11.45 – 12.30
    Moderator: Tony Hirst, Department of Communciation and Systems, The Open University
    Walking with developers
    Stephanie Taylor, Critical Eye Communications
    (H)appiness is a warm API!
    Dave Pattern, University of Huddersfield
    Richard Burkitt, LM Information Delivery

    Libraries need developers more than ever! Libraries are switched on to technology, handle masses of information and are a fantastic environment for innovation. Developers can help you improve vendor supplied systems. This session will explore the work and culture of developers, investigate the development cycle and show how to build a mutual trust and understanding of another profession. Working with developers, library and information professionals can build the technologies they need.

    At 11:45am to 12:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

    Coverage slide deck

  • B102 - Service redesign

    by Helen Clegg, Hal Kirkwood and Ulla de Stricker

    Track B - Rethinking Service Innovation

    B102 - Service redesign

    Moderator: Ulla de Stricker, de Stricker Associates
    Re-inventing knowledge and research
    Helen Clegg, Procurement & Analytic Solutions, A.T. Kearney
    Re-conceptualising and renovating an academic library
    Hal Kirkwood, Library of Management & Economics, Purdue University

    While today’s fast-changing technology landscape can be a challenging one in which to operate, it provides many opportunities for information professionals to be innovators and collaborators within their organisations. At A.T. Kearney, the Knowledge Team re-invented its service offering to internal and external customers. The Roland G Parrish Library has undergone a virtual and physical renovation resulting in a dynamic library which has revitalised its relationship with its key stakeholders.

    At 11:45am to 12:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • C102 - New tools, apps and web resources

    by Phil Bradley, Marydee Ojala and Arthur Weiss

    Track C - Rethinking Connections

    C102 - New tools, apps and web resources

    Moderator: Marydee Ojala, ONLINE Magazine
    What Phil has found
    Phil Bradley, Internet Consultant
    Watch the birdie! A round up of tools for analysing Twitter
    Arthur Weiss, AWARE

    How can the latest web apps and social media tools help librarians deliver cutting edge services? Phil Bradley will share his latest finds and give his opinion on their value to information professionals. Arthur Weiss will discuss the many tools that have been developed allowing users to analyse tweets and Twitter content

    At 11:45am to 12:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A103 - Seamless and digital - lessons from new libraries

    by Asgeir Rekkavik, Anne-Lena Westrum, Rurik Greenall, Fiona_Leslie and Dr JK Vijayakumar

    A103 - Seamless and digital - lessons from new libraries

    Moderator: Rurik Thomas Greenall, NTNU
    Digital services in a new digital library – using semantic technologies
    Anne-Lena Westrum, Oslo Public Library
    Asgeir Rekkavik, Oslo Public Library
    Seamless user experiences in a brand new library
    JK Vijayakumar, King Abdullah University of Science & Technology

    Brand new libraries are well positioned to deliver seamless, digital services. Oslo Public Library is developing digital services ahead of the opening of the new city library. At the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 90% of the collection is purchased, organised and accessed online. Hear how each library is developing innovative and user-centric services.
    Digital is pivotal: redrawing workflows for new libraries
    Fiona Leslie, OCLC

    OCLC is redrawing its offerings to libraries to reflect workflows that the new generation of libraries have beckoned in.

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B103 - Extending your user base

    by Suzanne Ahrling, Nanna Ekman Lindström, Ian Young, Donna Saxby, Boris Zetterlund and Mats Nordström

    Track B - Rethinking Service Innovation

    B103 - Extending your user base

    Moderator: Donna Saxby, Kingham Hill School
    How to use new technology and new channels to widen traditional library work and reach new users
    Mats Nordstrom, Malmo City Library
    Suzanne Ahrling, Malmo City Library
    Nanna Ekman, Malmo City Library
    A virtual platform for community service
    Ian Young, Axiell (UK)
    Boris Zetterlund, Axiell Library Group

    The library world is building web interfaces where Web 2.0 end-user interactivity and mash-up technology are combined with discovery tools. Users should be able to borrow media, participate in programme activities and be invited to share a closer relationship with their digital library. Malmö City Library in Sweden is actively working on the development of a digital library. The county of Gävleborgs län in Sweden is also heading in this direction and has plans to assure mobile access to its services and to link its web interfaces to metadata from other institutions such as archives and museums.

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • Track C - Rethinking Resources

    by Ulla de Stricker, Tom Edmonds and Emily Goodhand

    C103 - Access to, and legal use of, e-resources
    13.45 – 14.30
    Moderator: Ulla de Stricker, de Stricker Associates
    Fight or flight: dealing with digital copyright
    Emily Goodhand, University of Reading Libraries and Archives Copyright Alliance
    Beyond IP authentication – the next stage
    Tom Edmonds, Eduserv

    Are you confident when it comes to helping your users stay within copyright law? Emily Goodhand (@copyrightgirl) will delve into some of the complexities of applying UK and EU copyright law to technologies and offer some practical tips and guidance on dealing with digital copyright issues. Managing access for large numbers of users and increasing numbers of online resources can be challenging. Learn about new authentication mechanisms which are easy to use and provide a clear overview of your budget spend.

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A104 - The power of opening up

    by Richard Wallis and Tony Hirst

    Track A - Rethinking Technology

    A104 - The power of opening up

    The Cultural Linked Data Backbone
    Richard Wallis, OCLC
    Making the most of structured content: data products from OpenLearn
    Tony Hirst, Department of Communciation and Systems, The Open University

    A global interconnected web architecture can provide flexible, open access to library data and services through APIs across the web. Hear how this rich development environment is enabling libraries of all types and sizes to collaborate and innovate like never before. The Open University’s open educational resources are derived from course units that are authorised as structured XML documents on the OpenLearn site. Tony Hirst shows how new products can be derived from document archives, if we think of them as ‘data’.

    At 2:45pm to 3:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B104 - The new scholar

    by Henk van den Hoogen, Alison McNab and Joseph R. Kraus

    Track B - Rethinking Service Innovation

    B104 - The new scholar

    Moderator: Alison McNab, Kimberlin Library, De Montfort University
    UML+YOU – a new approach for the Library of Maastricht University to meet researchers’ needs
    Henk van den Hoogen, University Library, Maastricht University
    Scholarly communication: not just for scholars any more
    Joseph R. Kraus, Penrose Library, University of Denver

    Library services must support researchers in an effective, just-in- time and personalised fashion. Research support is central to Maastricht University Library strategy, called ‘UML+YOU: the plus side of your library’. With the debate surrounding the Open Access (OA) publishing of publicly funded research, Joseph Kraus explores how libraries can work with scholars to encourage OA publishing and to demonstrate research impact.

    At 2:45pm to 3:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • C104 - Video content

    by Moshe Pritsker, Andy Tattersall and Claire Beecroft

    Track C - Rethinking Resources

    C104 - Video content

    Video saved the library star
    Andy Tattersall, ScHARR University of Sheffield CILIP MmIT Committee member
    Claire Beecroft, ScHARR University of Sheffield
    Science video journals to increase productivity in research and education
    Moshe Pritsker, Journal of Visualized Experiments

    In 2011 Cisco predicted that video would make up over 50% of all consumer Internet traffic by 2012, whilst YouTube recently reported that one hour of content is uploaded per second. Like mobile technology, video is becoming increasingly important in our lives. ScHARR has identified a range of ways for libraries to employ video in research, teaching and marketing. The growing field of video publication is enabling more effective knowledge transfer of complex experimental studies. What are the technical challenges and implications for scholarly communication of this new form of publication?

    At 2:45pm to 3:30pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A105 - A virtual future

    by Jackie Carter, Laura Skilton, Iman Moradi, Sangeeta Namdev Dhamdhere, Michael Stephens and David Johnston

    A105 - A virtual future

    Moderator: Michael Stephens, San Jose State University & Tame the Web
    Gaming the library
    Iman Moradi, Running in the Halls
    SCARLET: embedding augmented reality within your institution
    Jackie Carter, MIMAS University of Manchester
    Laura Skilton, MIMAS University of Manchester
    The increasing scope of library software
    David Johnston, Applied Network Solutions
    The application of cloud based information services and virtualisation technology in libraries
    Sangeeta Namdev Dhamdhere, Library, Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce

    Hear how cloud based information services, new forms of library software, virtualisation technology, augmented reality and gamification are changing library services. Gamification is beginning to have a real impact on library services, changing the way users interact with resources and services. The pioneering use of Augmented Reality (AR) is bringing special collections into the age of the app and enhancing their use by students. The availability of new technologies means libraries need to rethink how they buy new apps and develop and roll out new solutions. Libraries are using cloud computing and virtualisation technology for data storage and providing cloud based information services to patrons.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B105 - Going mobile - beyond the library walls

    by Keren Mills, Angela Hamilton and Mary Peterson

    Track B - Rethinking Service Innovation

    B105 - Going mobile - beyond the library walls

    Moderator: Mary Peterson, South Australia Health
    Bringing the librarian to the student: personal service at a distance
    Angela Hamilton, University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (Canada)
    A coordinated and mobile Health Library Network
    Mary Peterson, South Australia Health
    Mobilising academic content online: challenges and rewards
    Keren Mills, Library Services, The Open University

    What are the challenges in delivering quality services via mobile devices? By personalising mobile services, librarians at the University of Toronto are able to build relationships with remote users. The Open University’s Macon project set out to prototype a mobile optimised resource discovery interface which can be used to expose quality academic content from third party and local collections.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • C105 - Opening up e-resources

    by Seth Cayley, Monique Schutterop, Eleanor Kenny, Oliver Howe, David Raitt, Esben Fjord and Hugh Murphy

    Track C - Rethinking Resources

    C105 - Opening up e-resources

    Moderator: David Raitt, The Electronic Library
    Eleanor Kenny, Europeana
    How to use Spotify Buttons to disseminate music online
    Esben Fjord, Gladsaxe Public Libraries
    A (surprisingly?) successful ebook story
    Hugh Murphy, NUI Maynooth (Ireland)

    It's no secret that libraries and archives hold a wealth of information in their collections. Digitisation allows us to breathe new life into our collections and make them accessible online from potentially anywhere in the world. Hear how Europeana goes about delivering its digitisation programme. Hear how Gladsaxe Public libraries experimented with Spotify's widget function as a tool for creating value-added playlists and recommendations. Hear how NUI Maynooth Library planned, marketed and rolled out a mobile e-book lending scheme.

    Cengage Learning
    Oliver Howe, Gale Cengage Learning
    Monique Schutterop, Gale Cengage
    Seth Cayley, Gale Cengage Learning

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • Drinks Reception

    All conference delegates and speakers are invited to a Drinks Reception from 17.00 – 18.00 in the Sponsor Showcase, hosted by Information Today.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 30th October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

Wednesday 31st October 2012

  • Keynote: The journey to digital at the British Library

    by Roly Keating

    The journey to digital at the British Library

    Roly Keating, The British Library

    Roly Keating was the BBC’s first ever Director of Archive Content, and a former Controller of BBC Two. He developed and implemented the BBC’s digital strategy for its programme library. In September 2012 he will take up his new post as Chief Executive at the British Library.

    The digital revolution is opening up enormous opportunities to the British Library. It is enabling large parts of the national collection to be widely shared both within the UK and globally; for the digital unification of ancient manuscripts separated across continents, and for increased collaboration between researchers.

    Expectations of what can be achieved are understandably high, and the challenges in meeting these considerable. Protecting copyright, ensuring material that is ‘born-digital’ is preserved, and dealing with the huge scale of the digitisation task are just some of the issues the British Library is tackling on its journey to digital.

    At 9:00am to 10:00am, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A201 - Super searching

    by Arthur Weiss, Rurik Greenall and Karen Blakeman

    A201 - Super searching

    Moderator: Rurik Thomas Greenall, NTNU
    Search turns social: resistance is futile
    Karen Blakeman, RBA Information Services
    The unknown Google: Google features and functions not seen on the search bar
    Arthur Weiss, AWARE

    It has been many years since web search results were simply based on how often your search terms occurred in a document and where. Now the order of your results is determined by location, personalisation and your social networks and interactions. Can we use and control this so-called personalisation to our advantage when carrying out serious research and what are the new essential tools for research? Google has become the search engine of choice for many. However Google offers much more than search or even Google+ social media. Other tools include Google Books, Google’s Art Project, Google Public Data and Google Trends. Learn about the hidden and mostly unknown functions and why they are important for information professionals.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

    Coverage slide deck

  • C201 - New roles

    by Marydee Ojala, Jane Greenstein, Jeanine Deckers and Ulla de Stricker

    Track C - Rethinking Roles

    C201 - New roles

    Moderator: Marydee Ojala, ONLINE Magazine
    Moderator: Ulla de Stricker, de Stricker Associates
    What will LIS graduates be doing in 25 years? The future of our profession
    Ulla de Stricker, de Stricker Associates
    Library science outside of the library – jobs in interactive media
    Jane Greenstein, Genex
    Ready for take-off: the airport librarian and The Airport Library
    Jeanine Deckers, ProBiblio

    It's inspiring to watch dynamic young professionals succeed. Yet our once clearly defined profession is splintering into many subspecialties and our skill sets appear to be subsumed into other professions. How will changes in media, communication and publishing impact the way today's LIS graduates will work 25 years hence? There are new opportunities for information professionals to use their skills in interactive media roles outside the library. Some Dutch librarians have re-invented library roles and services - by deciding to take the library to the people. Following on from the successful ‘libraries on the beach’ project, the next step was the opening of The Airport Library at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport. What does this success tell us about how library roles might develop?

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • Track B - Rethinking Marketing and Performance

    by Rachel Daniels, Michael Stephens, Jennifer Perkins and Lauren Vizor

    Track B - Rethinking Marketing and Performance

    B201 - Analysing your services and users

    Moderator: Michael Stephens, San Jose State University & Tame the Web
    Building information services from scratch
    Jennifer Perkins, formerly London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC)
    Cataloguing your customers – a liaison tool for recording and analysing customer information
    Rachel Daniels, Barrington Library, Cranfield University at the Defence Academy (UK)
    Lauren Vizor, Barrington Library, Cranfield University

    Hear how the LLDC developed IT and Information Services from scratch, using data mapping and other tools and processes to identify user requirements, as it had to quickly mobilise to take over London's Olympic Park. How are you measuring your transactions and analysing information about your users? Staff at Barrington Library decided to throw out unwieldy spreadsheets and use open source software to develop the Barrington Liaison Tool (BLT) which provides a searchable current and archival record of all forms of communication between library staff and the academics, researchers, and administrative staff they support.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A202 - New views on search

    by Eric Sieverts, Sharon Bostick, Nicola McNee and Bianca Kramer

    Track A - Rethinking Search

    A202 - New views on search

    Anything but the Library: Dealing with Student's Library Anxiety in the Digital Age
    Sharon Bostick, Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago
    Image conscious - how teens search the internet now
    Nicola McNee, Kingswood School
    Beyond coverage: a quantitative comparison of search and retrieval in Google Scholar vs Scopus/Web of Science
    Bianca Kramer, Utrecht University Library
    Eric Sieverts, Utrecht University Library

    Search is always changing and information professionals need to understand how their users search in order to provide client-centric services and products. Teenagers search differently - they type questions into search boxes and click on images in search results. How should information professionals respond to these adapted search techniques? Google Scholar has become increasingly popular as a general search engine for academic research papers next to Scopus and Web of Science (WoS). How does Google Scholar compare with Scopes/WoS from a user perspective?

    At 11:30am to 12:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B202 - Spreading the message

    by Matthew Reidsma, Aaron Tay and Gary

    Track B - Rethinking Marketing and Performance

    B202 - Spreading the message

    Moderator: Katherine Allen, Information Today Ltd
    Marketing libraries using memes
    Aaron Tay, National University of Singapore
    Using IFTTT to connect and spread your message
    Gary Green, Surrey County Council Library Service Voices For The Library
    Your website stinks – and it's your fault!
    Matthew Reidsma, Grand Valley State University

    How can you ensure that your stakeholders are aware of your services and products – and what you can do for them? By using text based and video memes, the National University of Singapore Libraries developed a new style of marketing. IFTTT (If This Then That) is a free online service that enables users to easily connect over 40 different channels and share information. IFTTT can be used to manage information flows and spread marketing messages with limited time and resources. If your users are frustrated by your library website, it might be that is has not been designed with them in mind. Hear how libraries can build useful, usable websites that can adapt to user needs.

    At 11:30am to 12:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

    Coverage slide deck

  • C202 - New skills, new learning

    by Ann Östman, Alison McNab, Hanna Krantz, Eleanor Grenholm and Holly Hibner

    Track C - Rethinking Roles

    C202 - New skills, new learning

    The library as facilitator of multimedia content creation: DigiLab

    Ann Östman, County Library Gävleborg Uppsala
    Eleanor Grenholm, County Library Gävleborg Uppsala
    Hanna Krantz, County Library Gävleborg Uppsala
    Informal learning in the library workplace: the role of unconferences
    Alison McNab, Kimberlin Library, De Montfort University
    Thingamabobs and doodads: tech support IS reference
    Holly Hibner, Plymouth District Library

    Library users often rely on staff for technology support. What core technology competencies do staff need and what training strategies can you roll out to help staff keep up to date? In Sweden, the creation of a DigiLab (which is still under development) means that librarians will be able to develop new media and technology skills and become significant digital partners with users and other institutions. At De Montfort University, library staff attend regular in-house Mashed Library events, which provide information about in-house projects, feedback on external events, and the opportunity to explore new tools and technologies. At Plymouth District Library, tech support is a vital resource to the community – and, when well done, can effectively market library services.

    At 11:30am to 12:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

    Coverage slide deck

  • A203 - Web scale discoverability

    by Mary Schlembach, William Mischo and Trevor A. Dawes

    Track A - Rethinking Discovery

    A203 - Web scale discoverability

    User searching behaviour models
    William Mischo, Grainger Engineering Library Information Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Mary Schlembach, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Primo and Summon: perfect together?
    Trevor A Dawes, Princeton University Library

    If libraries are to provide the services their users need, it is imperative they understand how users are really using their products and services. Our current understanding of user searching behaviours is incomplete and studies reveal contradictory results. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library (with other academic libraries) has been gathering detailed transaction log data on user searching. Princeton University Library decided to select a new discovery service to improve users’ access to the array of resources available to them. Hear how they worked through the selection process and moved forward with a hybrid implementation of Primo (from Ex Libris) and Summon (from Serials Solutions).

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B203 - Evidence and impact

    by Dave Pattern, Brian Kelly and Jenny Delasalle

    Track B - Rethinking Marketing and Performance

    B203 - Evidence and impact

    What does the evidence tell us about institutional repositories?
    Brian Kelly, UKOLN University of Bath
    Jenny Delasalle, University of Warwick
    Library Impact Data Project
    Dave Pattern, University of Huddersfield

    What does the latest evidence tell us about the impact of library services? This session presents the latest findings of JISC’s Library Impact Data Project, which sets out to measure the impact academic libraries are providing to their students. The project seeks to investigate the potential causal links between library usage and final grades. What does the evidence tell us about the current provision of institutional repository services? Is there a need to reboot and re-imagine the approaches?

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

    Coverage slide deck

  • C203 - Everyone is learning

    by Donna Saxby, Anna Jane Cantrell, Anthea Sutton and Rochelle Mazar

    Track C - Rethinking Teaching and Learning

    C203 - Everyone is learning

    Moderator: Donna Saxby, Kingham Hill School
    Using blogs, Twitter & wikis to deliver e-learning
    Anna Jane Cantrell, ScHARR, University of Sheffield
    Anthea Sutton, ScHARR, University of Sheffield
    How we stopped giving instructors what we know they need and how that changed everything
    Rochelle Mazar, University of Toronto Mississauga

    ScHARR runs CPD e-learning courses for library and information professionals. The programme has transformed learning opportunities in the UK, Australia and New Zealand. Librarians at the University of Toronto Mississauga have transformed their training model into an open door, consultative model. Both case studies demonstrate effective and flexible approaches to skills transfer.

    At 1:45pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • A204 - Improving discovery

    by Helle Lauridsen, Robin Smith and Manfred Hauer

    Track A: Rethinking Discovery

    A204 - Improving discovery

    Moderator: Robin Smith
    Manfred Hauer, AGI - Information Management Consultants (Germany)
    Improving the discovery of research materials in developing nations
    Helle Lauridsen, Discovery Services, Serials Solutions

    In German-speaking countries, an increasing number of libraries have been adding tables of content (TOC) and keywords into their catalogues. Users find the TOC information helps them search more effectively, whatever their location. The information landscape in developing countries is also changing. Libraries now have online access to free or low cost content but often researchers and students are not trained in information literacy. Librarians at Serials Solutions are volunteering for a World Health Organization project to make a difference to how information is discovered in developing countries.

    At 2:45pm to 3:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • B204 - Demonstrating and delivering ROI

    by Graham Coult and Marydee Ojala

    Track B - Rethinking Marketing and Performance

    B204 - Demonstrating and delivering ROI

    Information, libraries and the bottom line
    Graham Coult, ASLIB
    New frontiers for research: data sets
    Marydee Ojala, ONLINE Magazine

    It is a paradox that when much economic activity, education, health and welfare is so heavily based on information and knowledge assets, that the skills which help us manage and exploit those assets seem to be experiencing a decline in demand. How can libraries develop and demonstrate return on investment (ROI). Internet librarians have the perfect skill set when it comes to helping their organisations transform raw data into actionable knowledge. Data research presents a new opportunity for librarians to maximise their contribution to organisations.

    At 2:45pm to 3:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre

  • C204 - Backchannelling

    by Kay Grieves, Karen Marie Øvern, Michelle Halpin and Aaron Tay

    Track C - Rethinking Teaching and Learning

    C204 - Backchannelling

    Moderator: Aaron Tay, National University of Singapore
    Using Google Forms to engage students in your lecture
    Karen Marie Øvern, Gjøvik University College

    Adventures in conversation - nurturing customer relationships and capturing impact through service culture change
    Kay Grieves, Library Services, University of Sunderland
    Michelle Halpin, University Library Services, University of Sunderland

    Getting students engaged and interested in learning information skills is not easy. Using Google Forms during the class is a way of checking that your students have understood what you are teaching them and are a way of getting direct feedback about the content. The data can also be used later to improve lecture quality. New technologies can be used to nurture conversations between customers and libraries. Conversations help build an understanding of customer needs and can help them articulate the real impact libraries are having on them.

    At 2:45pm to 3:30pm, Wednesday 31st October

    In Olympia Conference Centre