Sessions at RailsConf 2012 about Ruby on Rails on Tuesday 24th April

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  • Preparing for Rapid Growth - Tips for Enabling Your Rails App and Team to Grow Quickly

    by Patrick Leonard

    Every young company expects to grow quickly, but is your engineering team really ready for it? In 3 years, iTriage went from a kitchen table to one of the leading mobile consumer healthcare apps with over 5 million downloads. Staying ahead of this growth didn't just mean hiring more Rails engineers.

    Patrick will discuss what iTriage did (and continues to do) to stay ahead of our growth, including:

    • Technical architecture, including use of Rails Engines to enable a modular, RESTful service-based design
    • Enabling high quality iPhone, Android and Web apps
    • Development and release management processes
    • Recruiting and hiring approaches

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Tuesday 24th April

    In Room 615, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

  • Presenters and Decorators: A Code Tour

    by Mike Moore

    Presenter and Decorators are design approaches that can be used in Rails applications outside of the standard Models, Views and Controllers. These approaches are becoming more and more popular as teams search for new ways to identify and manage the complexity within their applications.

    In this session Mike Moore will defined the Presenter and Decorator approaches using simple and clear terminology. Common design problems in Rails applications will be shown using real-life code examples and refactored toward Presenters and Decorators. Code will be improved and strengthened by identifying and respecting the dependencies within large applications.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Rails for Zombies 2 (AKA Intro to Rails - Part 2)

    by Gregg Pollack

    Done with Rails for Zombies but can't stop the craving for a second corpse? We’ll pickup where Rails for Zombies 1 leaves off and jump into the topics listed below. All you need to bring is a laptop with Wi-Fi and a browser which isn’t Internet Explorer. All coding will be done through our web application, and there will be plenty of lab assistants to help you if you get stuck along the way.

    Topics covered:

    • How to create a Rails app, the command line, database migrations, the Ruby 1.9 Hash Syntax, Bundler, and Database configuration.
    • Named Scope, Callbacks, Include, has_many, and has_many :through relationships.
    • REST principles, view forms, nested resources, and view partials.
    • Sending email from our Rails app and the Rails 3.1: the Asset Pipeline.
    • Controller rendering options and custom RESTful routes. Design an API with Rails and respond to AJAX requests.

    At 10:30am to 2:30pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Let's make the web faster - tips from trenches @ Google

    by Ilya Grigorik

    Google loves speed, and we want to make the entire web faster - yes, that includes your Rails app! We'll explore what we've learned from running our own services at scale, as well as cover the research, projects, and open sourced tools we've developed in the process.

    We'll start at the top with website optimization best practices, take a look at what the browser and HTML5 can do for us, take a detour into the optimizations for the mobile web, and finally dive deep into the SPDY and TCP protocol optimizations.

    We'll cover a lot of ground, so bring a coffee. By the end of the session, you should have a good checklist to help you optimize your own site.

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Keeping Rails Applications on Track with Brakeman

    by Justin Collins

    A recent report by Veracode (http://www.veracode.com/reports/...) found cross-site scripting in 68% of surveyed web applications and SQL injection in 32%, even though these are well-known, easily preventable, and easily detectable vulnerabilities. As applications grow larger, it becomes harder and harder to manually verify that every line of code is adhering to security guidelines - even given the built-in protection available with Ruby on Rails.

    Brakeman (http://brakemanscanner.org/) is an open source static analysis tool which provides painless vulnerability scans of Rails code from "rails new" through deployment. Running Brakeman as a part of continuous integration provides feedback during all stages of development and can alert developers immediately when a potential vulnerability is introduced. Bringing security testing as close to the developer as possible (even scanning as files are saved) means security problems are caught faster - and the sooner problems are found the cheaper they are to fix.

    As a static analysis tool, Brakeman can be run without worrying about deploying the whole application stack: no webserver, database, configuration, or application dependencies required - not even Rails itself. This allows fast, easy vulnerability scans on any Rails project.

    We talk a lot about testing in the Ruby and Rails community, but somehow security testing is passed over. This needs to change!

    This talk will cover how to incorporate Brakeman into Rails development and how it can improve application security, as well as a look into how Brakeman works internally.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage video

  • Ten Things You Didn't Know Rails Could Do

    by James Edward Gray II

    Rails is huge. Even if you have worked with it for a long time, it's unlikely that you have stumbled across everything yet.

    Do you really know what all of the built-in Rake tasks do? Have you seen all of the methods ActiveSupport makes available to you? Are you aware of all the queries ActiveRecord is capable of?

    In this talk, I'll dig into the extras of Rails and see if I can't turn up some features that you don't see all of the time, but that might just be handy to know about anyway. I'll make sure you come out of this able to impress your friends at the hackfest.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Digging Deep with ActiveSupport::Notifications

    by Matt Sanders

    Rails 3 and above includes a powerful instrumentation system, ActiveSupport::Notifications, which can be used to track performance and event information for all aspects of your application. Notifications are light-weight, easy to setup, and can be consumed by multiple subscribers (logs, audit trails, consolidated metrics, other parts of your application).

    In this session we’ll start with the basics of ActiveSupport::Notifications and work our way to powerful advanced use cases. Topics we’ll explore include:

    • How to set up and use notifications
    • Logging what you want from any tier of your system
    • How to capture and aggregate performance/business data for the metrics you care about most
    • Conditional monitoring in production: flag on and off data by system or customer to get to the root of problems more quickly
    • Using ActiveSupport::Notifications in non-Rails applications and your own libraries

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Sustainable Productivity with Rails

    by Xavier Shay

    Ruby on Rails claims to be "optimized for programmer happiness and sustainable productivity." I strongly disagree with the latter assertion. In this talk I will channel my half decade of industry Rails experience into expounding this position and providing constructive feedback as to what needs to change---in both the framework and the community---before we can support this claim. I'll also cover practical techniques you can use to be sustainably productive on your own projects in the meantime.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • Securing the Rails

    by Aaron Bedra

    Building safe web applications isn’t always easy. The good news is that Rails provides a lot of features that will help you along the way. Aaron will walk you through the common mistakes made by web developers, and how to account for them while working with Rails. He will also walk you through some tools you can use to make securing your applications much much easier.

    At 4:00pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Using Rails without Rails

    by Piotr Sarnacki

    Rails got much more modular after 3.0 rewrite. But do you know how to use specific rails elements outside Rails? What if you would like to use ActionView with some other library (like webmachine)? Have you ever needed to render view with layouts outside of the rails stack? Or maybe you wanted to build some kind of system that fetches templates from database rather than from files? Router anyone? You know that you can use it outside rails too?

    In this talk I will dive into Rails internals and will show you what's there and how you can use it outside rails.

    Although I will focus on using those parts standalone, this knowledge will most likely help you also build your apps if you ever need something sophisticated that requires modification of regular rails behavior.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Zero downtime deploys for Rails apps

    by Pedro Belo

    What does it take to deploy an application without any downtime?

    More than most Ruby developers would expect, turns out; what is aggravated by the lack of documentation and other resources on this topic.

    In this talk we'll dive into both development practices (hot compatibility, database migrations, caching) and deployment setup (Heroku, Unicorn, HAProxy), covering everything you need to know in order to ship code without affecting a single customer.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Powerful Interfaces

    by Caike Souza

    In this talk we will explore the best practices in using interfaces as the foundation for designing object oriented applications in Ruby and Rails. We will talk about some of the techniques that make it possible to write loosely coupled components that can be easily extended to respond to requirement changes.

    At 4:30pm to 5:00pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown