RailsConf 2012 schedule

Monday 23rd April 2012

  • BohConf

    BohConf is a hacking-centric event that will include community code drives featuring well-known OSS authors, barcamp-style discussions, and more.

    We've got 2 rooms reserved for everybody's favorite unconference. No RailsConf badge required. Please register on EventBrite (http://bohconf-railsconf2012.eve...).

    Follow @bohconf for the latest news.

    At 9:00am to 9:00pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 406/408, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Keynote: Welcome

    Welcome to RailsConf 2012!

    At 9:00am to 9:15am, Monday 23rd April

    Coverage note

  • Keynote: David Heinemeier Hansson

    by David Heinemeier Hansson

    David Heinemeier Hansson is a partner at 37signals, a privately-held Chicago-based company committed to building the best web-based tools possible with the least number of features necessary.

    37signals' products include Basecamp, Highrise, Backpack, Campfire, Ta-da List, and Writeboard. 37signals' products do less than the competition -- intentionally.

    He is also the creator of Ruby on Rails.

    At 9:15am to 10:00am, Monday 23rd April

    Coverage note video

  • Designing Hypermedia APIs

    by Steve Klabnik

    Rails did a lot to bring REST to developers, but its conception leaves the REST devotee feeling a bit empty. "Where's the hypermedia?" she says. "REST isn't RPC," he may cry. "WTF??!?!" you may think. "I have it right there! resources :posts ! What more is there? RPC? Huh?"

    In this talk, Steve will explain how to design your APIs so that they truly embrace the web and HTTP. Just as there's an impedance mismatch between our databases, our ORMs, and our models, there's an equal mismatch between our applications, our APIs, and our clients. Pros and cons of this approach will be discussed, as well as why we aren't building things this way yet.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • i18n on Rails: A Twitter Approach

    by Cameron Dutro

    Twitter's internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) model doesn't follow traditional methods. Instead of contracting out to professional translators, Twitter maintains an active community of over 500,000 volunteers who have helped successfully launch Twitter in 28 languages, including right-to-left languages like Hebrew and Arabic. Learn about some of the technical challenges we face, how to translate a Rails application at scale, and what to do when the i18n gem and po files aren't quite enough. We'll take a look at the tricky stuff too, like dates, times, lists, plurals, alphabetization, and capitalization using the twitter_cldr gem, and go over internationalization best practices. Finally, we'll explain how to maintain internationalization of your Javascript alongside your Rails code for an end-to-end solution.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • Not a Vendor Pitch: Real World Rails Apps at Massive Scale

    by Pitr Vernigorov, Joshua Warchol, Lew Cirne, Jon Pliske and Tim Sturge

    New Relic CEO Lewis Cirne will lead a panel discussion with representatives from some of today's most popular, highly-trafficked web sites. With millions of uniques a month, find out how these organizations are optimizing their Rails-based sites for mobile, for unexpected traffic bursts, and for seasonality.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 615, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Rails for Zombies (AKA Intro to Rails - Part 1)

    by Gregg Pollack

    Do you need to start learning Ruby on Rails? In this morning tutorial the Envy Labs team will lead you through all five labs of their Rails for Zombies course. Unlike other tutorials, all you need to start coding Rails is a laptop with Wi-Fi and a browser which isn’t Internet Explorer. All coding will be done through our web application, and there will be plenty of lab assistants to help you if you get stuck along the way. Before you come to the course we recommend you play through http://www.tryruby.org/. It’s an in-browser Ruby tutorial.

    Topics Covered:

    • Basic ActiveRecord CRUD
    • Models, Validations, has_many, belongs_to
    • Views, ERB, Loops
    • Controllers, before filter
    • Basic Routing

    At 10:30am to 2:30pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Using Backbone.js with Rails: Patterns from the Wild

    by Sarah Mei

    Backbone.js is a flexible, lightweight tool for structuring the JavaScript in a modern web application. It goes great with Rails! But beware - "flexible and lightweight" are code words for "you build your own plumbing." Backbone is new enough that we haven't established strong patterns for that plumbing yet, so different Backbone codebases look very different, and when you're new to the idea of structuring your JavaScript, it can be tough to tell where the win is.

    So in this talk I'll demystify Backbone. I'll show several very different ways I've used it on real Rails apps. You'll get a feel for the circumstances when Backbone makes sense, and moreover, when each of the different approaches to Backbone make sense.

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • CoffeeScript for the Rubyist

    by Mark Bates

    CoffeeScript is taking the world, and particularly the Rails eco system, by storm. This little language has provided an almost Ruby like abstraction onto of JavaScript. CoffeeScript is trying to make writing front end code as much fun as Ruby makes writing backend code.

    In this talk we start with the basic concepts of CoffeeScript and move on to the more powerful and fun features of the language. While we're looking at CoffeeScript we'll see how it relates to the Ruby code we write everyday. What do Ruby 1.9 lambdas and CoffeeScript functions have in common? Which of the two languages supports splats, default arguments, and ranges? The answers may surprise you.

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Engine Yard - The Cloud, Application Support, and You - Ask Me Anything

    This panel is made up of EY Support Engineers and Developers and they are ready to answer your questions! Want to know more about deploying to the cloud? What does PaaS mean to you? What is the EY Stack?

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 615, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Getting Down To Earth: Geospatial Analysis With Rails

    by Daniel Azuma

    It is no secret that location has become ubiquitous. Mobile GPS, available data sets, and easy-to-use mapping services have brought geospatial information within reach of web developers. Location already plays a significant role in many of the major services such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google, not to mention legions of startups.

    However, for those of us implementing more than the most trivial features, it is also true that location is challenging. A significant learning curve awaits us, involving spatial databases, coordinate systems, interchange formats, and plenty of math. Our Ruby-based tools lag a bit behind those available to our Java- and Python-oriented colleagues, and effective documentation is scarce.

    This presentation aims to jump-start Rails developers hoping to go beyond putting a few pushpins on a Google Map. Rather than spending a lot of time explaining the many concepts involved, we'll bypass the learning curve and jump straight into walking through code for a few nontrivial applications. The hope is that the conceptual knowledge will come naturally as a result of seeing it in action, but pointers to online resources will also be provided to fill in any gaps.

    A thorough understanding of Ruby, Rails, ActiveRecord, and SQL will be assumed. No prior knowledge of GIS or computational geometry will be required, though it may be helpful.

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Practical Machine Learning and Rails

    by Andrew Cantino and Ryan Stout

    Many people know that machine learning techniques can facilitate learning from, and adapting to, noisy, real-world data, but aren't sure how to begin using them. Starting with two real-world examples, we will introduce you to some libraries that bring machine learning techniques to your Rails applications. We will then dive into the art of feature design, one of the first practical roadblocks that many people encounter when applying machine learning. Feature design is the challenging, subtle, and often trail-and-error process of selecting and transforming the data you provide for your learning algorithm, and it is often the hardest part of using these techniques. Our goal is for you to come out of this talk with the tools necessary to think about machine learning and how to apply it to your problems.

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Mobile Rage - What causes it & how to fix it

    by Lori M Olson

    Most of us have been there. That website you want to use, from your mobile device, that just refuses to cooperate. From the Flash-only, to the can't f**king log in, to the redirect-to-mobile-and-stay-there sites, there's more than enough websites out there to invoke Mobile Rage.

    Although we all know that the best mobile development strategy is "mobile-first", we also all know how many sites and applications out there were designed and built by people who didn't imagine how fast mobile would take over.

    Come learn about the common mistakes most people make for mobile, and some of the simple solutions you can use to help reduce Mobile Rage, without having to do a complete rewrite.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Rails Engines Patterns

    by Andy Maleh

    This talk covers a successful utilization of Rails Engines to share features that cut across the layers of MVC in different Rails 3 projects. Rails Engines thus provide the best of both worlds: improved productivity by reusing MVC code (including assets like Javascript, CSS, and Images) and better flexibility by allowing different applications to customize behavior as needed without reliance on application-dependent conditionals. Rails Engine patterns will be provided to guide developers on how to leverage Rails Engines' reusability and flexibility without sacrificing maintainability.

    Outline:

    • Basics of Rails Engines
    • Rails Engine Patterns
    • Improved Productivity Tips
    • Summary of Benefits and Trade-Offs

    Attendees should walk away with an overview of Rails Engines and guidelines on how to utilize them effectively.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • RoRoRoomba - Ruby on Rails on Roomba

    by Charles Abbot

    RoR makes an excellent framework for off-the-beaten-path type of projects, like hacking Roombas and other robots. In this presentation, I'll demonstrate how our soon to be robot overlords will be happy when we gift them with RoR and a connection to the internet. The presentation will include working examples and demonstrations of:

    • communicating with an Arduino chip via Ruby
    • tethered serial and wireless bluetooth control of a Roomba via Ruby and Arduino
    • two-way communication with our robot friends over the web using Ruby on Rails and popular web services
    • useful applications of robots controlled over the web
    • 3 RoRoR pitfalls to watch-out for
    • live performance of "Chiron Beta Prime" by Jonathan Coulton*

    The presentation will close with an argument for why hacking on fun, often eccentric, projects in your spare time is essential for staying motivated, habitual improvement, and tangential learning -- i.e., being a real pragmatic programmer.

    *not included, perhaps

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Up and to the right – how Spiceworks is scaling 200 million requests per month

    by Francis Sullivan and David Babbitt

    Curious how Spiceworks, a social business app built on Rails, keeps 2 million active users happy? With Ruby on Rails, baby! In the last year our usage has increased 8x and now exceeds 200 million requests per month. Join Francis Sullivan, CTO and Co-founder, and David Babbitt, Technical Program Manager, to hear about the architecture and best practices we adopted to make this happen.

    Get the ins-and-outs on:

    • Hosting a high volume Rails application
    • Choosing what to optimize
    • Lessons learned while moving to JRuby
    • Updating a large codebase through Rails beta to Rails 3
    • Scaling the dev organization

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 615, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • ActiveSupport and ActiveModel

    by Bryan Liles

    Have you ever wondered what makes Rails tick? Bryan Liles will cover two of the pillars of the Rails foundation: ActiveSupport and ActiveModel. Together we will discover where some of Rails’ ease and power originates and how make use of it in your projects.

    At 2:30pm to 3:00pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • From Rails Rumble to 50,000,000 results

    by Mikel Lindsaar

    StillAlive.com was born from the 48 hour intense 2010 Rails Rumble and has grown! Having recently passed our 50,000,000th site result, this talk discusses the real world challenges and optimisations required to take a code base born from the fires of YAGNI to a production system.

    This talk isn't about how you can scale from 0 requests to 500 billion requests per microsecond, but give a practical view to some of the performance problems we faced as the application steadily grew from a hack job into a functioning system.

    The journey will go through the mistakes we made, challenges faced and real world optimisations discovered, including some tricks we learnt along the way from concurrent index creation to using the ZeroMQ messaging framework with Rails

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • How Rails helps make cooking more fun in Japan

    by Masahiro Ihara

    With more than a million user submitted recipes and an active user base of 15 million monthly unique users, cookpad.com is the world's largest recipe website, and an essential tool for the 50% of all Japanese women in their 20's and 30's who use the site regularly.

    The Cookpad.com service is built on Rails and is running entirely on AWS in Tokyo, where more than 30 engineers are working in small agile teams to bring more value to users every day.

    As you know, Japan had a huge earthquake and tsunami last year, and some of those affected didn't have cooking facilities, water or basic foods for long time. Many Cookpad users immediately uploaded simple recipes that could be made without the basics in adverse conditions, and helped those in hardship immensely allowing them to enjoy food with their families at that difficult time.

    In this session, I'll talk about the COOKPAD way of creating services and the technologies behind them, and how we improve peoples lives through cooking every day.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 615, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

  • Progressive Enhancement on the Mobile Web

    by John Bender

    Progressive Enhancement isn't important on the mobile web because it's all Webkit right? Not so fast. Even among Webkit implementations events, css, and performance vary widely. We'll talk about the darker corners of the mobile web and show how jQuery Mobile can help you build Rails applications that are reliable, accessible, and support more devices.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • Use the Source, Luke: High fidelity data with event sourcing

    by Keith Gaddis

    Ever run into a really gnarly data problem and wished you had a do-over? Tired of wrestling with ActiveRecord to model a really complex domain? Looking for a good way to echo state changes to external systems? Then grab a cup of joe and settle in for a look at event-sourcing your data.

    Event-sourced data uses Plain Old Ruby Objects (POROs) to model your data and exclusively uses events to mutate state on those objects. By serializing the events, the state of your data can be recreated for any point in time, and outside listeners can create specialized purposeful datastores of the data, enabling complex business requirements with fewer hassles. We'll also touch on other architectural patterns like DCI and CQRS that play well with this idea.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • Rails-flavored Ruby

    by Michael Hartl

    Based on Chapter 4 of the Ruby on Rails Tutorial by Michael Hartl, “Rails-flavored Ruby” covers the aspects of the Ruby programming language most important for developing Rails applications. Topics include hashes, arrays, and other objects; blocks; functions; and classes.

    At 3:00pm to 3:30pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage note video

  • A Polyglot Heroku

    by Terence Lee

    Over the past year, Heroku has expanded by going polyglot and supporting languages like Java, Clojure, Python, Node.js, and Scala in addition to Ruby. In this session, we will discuss major updates to the platform and our emphasis on making the Ruby developer experience even better. We'll leave plenty of time at the end for any questions.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 615, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage video

  • Realtime web applications with streaming REST

    by Brad Gessler

    As more people collaborate on the web with your applications, its not enough to just persist data to the database; it needs to be pushed out to your users web browsers so that they're always working with the freshest data.

    In this session, Brad will show how to build a real-time layer on top of an existing Rails application's authorization and resource logic so that you can build on top of the hard work already invested in your Rails application.

    Topics that will be discussed include:

    • Why I didn't choose Socket.IO
    • Stream application resources into Backbone.js models to keep data fresh
    • Hook into ActiveRecord to push representations of data into a message queue
    • Message queue naming conventions public/private resource streams
    • Exposing message queues to HTTP
    • Securing streams with existing application authorization logic
    • Considerations for streaming in a production environment

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • RVM & Essential Rails Development Tools

    by Olivier Lacan

    Working with Rails often means switching between several Ruby versions back and forth which is made almost seamless by RVM. It also involves several simple command line tools like Pry, Guard, and Pow and that will make your development life so much easier.

    At 4:00pm to 4:30pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Securing your site

    by Thomas Pomfret

    Rails makes it very easy to rapidly develop web applications, but doesn’t always make it so simple to deploy or secure them.

    This talk is going to focus on best practices to secure your rails application, learnt through multiple high profile projects and penetration tests. The talk will be practical and show that this isn’t necessarily hard if thought about from the start.

    We’ll also touch on getting the right balance of security without it getting in the way of the users.

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • The Future of Sass

    by Hampton Catlin

    A glimpse of some of the features coming to Sass in the pending 3.2 release. Plus, a huge announcement about the project that's been months in the making as we have secretly toiled away on something that we think will be awesome. Hear it first at this talk. Repositories will be made public when the talk is over. Shh! Its a secret!

    At 4:00pm to 4:45pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • ActiveRecord Scopes and Arel

    by Jacob Swanner

    Scopes are a great way of encapsulating query logic in a granular, reusable way. This talk will cover some techniques you can use to keep those scopes as composable and portable as possible. We’ll cover how to use Arel directly, while avoiding the common practice of using SQL fragments, and show you how this can make your scopes more reusable, while at the same time preventing you from using database vendor specific operators, such as ILIKE.

    At 4:30pm to 5:00pm, Monday 23rd April

    In Room 616, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Keynote: Simplicity Matters

    by Rich Hickey

    Rich Hickey, the author of Clojure and designer of Datomic, is a software developer with over 20 years of experience in various domains. Rich has worked on scheduling systems, broadcast automation, audio analysis and fingerprinting, database design, yield management, exit poll systems, and machine listening, in a variety of languages.

    At 5:30pm to 6:00pm, Monday 23rd April

Tuesday 24th April 2012

  • BohConf

    BohConf is a hacking-centric event that will include community code drives featuring well-known OSS authors, barcamp-style discussions, and more.

    We've got 2 rooms reserved for everybody's favorite unconference. No RailsConf badge required. Please register on EventBrite (http://bohconf-railsconf2012.eve...).

    Follow @bohconf for the latest news.

    At 9:00am to 9:00pm, Tuesday 24th April

    In Room 406/408, Hilton Austin Downtown