Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Journalism on Saturday 10th March

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  • A Penny Press for the Digital Age

    by Tom Stites, Jessamyn West, Fiona Morgan, Norberto Santana Jr and Ryan Thornburg

    In the 19th century, the “penny press” revolutionized journalism by covering news that appealed to the broadest possible public. Today, as media organizations struggle to monetize online coverage and chase tech trends, they have all but abandoned less-than-affluent readers — and with them, the commitment to public service journalism. According to Pew, fewer than half of Americans who make under $75K a year go online for news. This panel will reconsider the digital divide in terms of information as well as technology. We’ll explore how low-income and working-class people – the majority of Americans – can be included in the future of online news. We'll discuss new models for participatory, data-driven local journalism. We’re not trying to save newspapers or kill them off. Our aim is to help bring journalism back to those who punch a clock. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Philanthropy Is Not the Future of Journalism

    by Nicole Hollway and Janet Coats

    While donations play a key role in community support and engagement, the writing is on the wall regarding how much government, private and foundation funding will continue to be available to public media. As media that exists to serve the public, often the mass reach required to compete for the media dollars available for banner advertising is at odds with serving the public mission. We will look at specific examples of nonprofit news organizations developing mission-supported revenue streams, integrating donor relationships into marketing and advertising, and considering revenue streams that are separate from and/or compliment their mission.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Crowd Sourcing Community Projects Like Tom Sawyer

    by Dave Olson

    Customers are part of your culture. By inviting them to participate in your campaigns and community, you can speed progress, gain candid market insight, and have some fun. This conversation will share tips about wrangling your passionate users to help with specific tasks for mutual benefit. The tips and tactics will include: understanding motivations, providing rewards, setting boundaries, understanding types of volunteers, organizing disappearing task forces, avoiding "cat herding,” and thwarting confusion and conflicts.

    Practical examples will include: crowd-sourcing a multi-language software translation project; organizing citizen reporting at an Olympic Games; creating participatory contests to produce content and assets; identifying perpetrators and looters in a riot; raising relief money under difficult circumstances; and, rapidly helping victims in disaster zones.

    From the examples, we’ll discuss methods for channeling the passion of audiences into tangible results in much the same manner as Tom Sawyer recruited his fishing pals to help whitewash his fence.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol View North, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Rude Awakening: Content Strategy Is Super Hard

    by Karen McGrane, Kristina Halvorson, Joe Gollner, Erin Kissane and Mark McCormick

    It's official: "content strategy" has become a trendy buzzword phrase that everyone is using to describe everything remotely related to content. SEO content strategy! Social media content strategy! Content marketing content strategy! Wait. This sucks. Weren't we just starting to focus on The Important Stuff? The messy, complicated content stuff that companies have been ignoring for years? What needs to happen now if we're finally going to get this content thing right? Four of the brightest minds in content strategy will tackle some the toughest issues our companies are facing: cross-platform distribution, governance, legacy content, distributed publishing, and trying to prepare our content for future technologies we can't possibly predict. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Tweeting Osama’s Death: From Citizen to Journalist

    by Steve Myers and Sohaib Athar

    Within hours of learning that Osama bin Laden had been killed in Pakistan, Twitter users realized that a man had unknowingly live-tweeted the raid. Sohaib Athar (@reallyvirtual) showed what happens when ordinary people, by chance, find themselves in the middle of newsworthy events: They act like journalists, sharing information, asking questions, and working with others to figure out what happened. The speed with which his tweets traveled the world show how Twitter can turbocharge simple acts of citizen journalism by spreading them to new audiences. Steve Myers, managing editor of the Poynter Institute’s website, will describe how Athar’s tweets illustrate citizen journalism practices and how U.S. journalists learned of them so quickly. Athar, in his first trip to the U.S. since bin Laden’s killing, will describe what happened, what it was like to be in the middle of an international media scrum, and how the incident has affected his views of the media and changed his use of Twitter.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Reporters & Evangelists: Politics of Online News

    by Andrew Gruen, Prajwal Ciryam, Mary O'Hara and Shira Toeplitz

    How much does ideology matter for online journalists and news sites? People talk about a fractured web of ideological bubbles where liberals go to Daily Kos and conservatives to The Daily Caller. But do more traditional media outlets use ideology as a way to make their brands stand out online? Does taking an ideological position on the Web damage a reporter's credibility? Is selling your ideology a good way to make a living on the internet?This panel assembles an all-star cast of reporters from the BBC, The Guardian, Politico, and even Ohmynews.com in Korea to debate that question. Between them they have written for some of the top online news sites on three continents and have appeared on ABC, CBS, CNN, CNBC, MSNBC, and FOX. Representing a range of political attitudes and journalistic creeds, the panel will seek to answer: What is the role of ideological journalism in online news? This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Tracking Trends to Make Great Content

    by Jessica Hilberman

    There's an adage in journalism that three of anything makes a trend. But, you and your two pals 'liking' something doesn't make it the next big thing. Internet trends are surprising, whimsical, and fast. The best trending indices are targeted and personal, distilling what you'll like from what's popular.

    Learn how to track rising, breaking, and spiking trends from broad sources. Identify what works for your audience and use trends to build content that is compelling and fresh. Don't waste time on concepts that won't work. Find out how personalized trends can offer programming insights and inform content creation decisions. And learn when to skip the waiting and wag the dog.

    At 6:00pm to 6:15pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin