Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Art on Sunday 11th March

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  • Material Change-Tackling Human Rights with Artists

    by Eve Blossom

    Story-telling is a process for healing. As we hold in our hands the technology to address global problems, we can foster a new world of creativity & community through individual expression & shared visions. Globally, artists and technologists are empowering other artisans and creators by celebrating their spirit, talents and traditions - giving them a stronger voice for their future. Eve Blossom, founder of Lulan Artisans and author of Material Change, will share stories of her journey of creating a business that merges design and social change. Material Change offers actionable holistic models for designers and social entrepreneurs, and explains an open-source model for others to adapt, customize and share. Eve will debut We've, a digital extension of Lulan Artisans: a novel approach for buying, and selling artisanal goods through relationships and story. We've allows new forms of communication and business to evolve from communal creativity, capturing the zeitgeist of the planet.

    At 9:30am to 9:50am, Sunday 11th March

    In Ballroom G, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Mixel: Art, Tablets and the Creator Economy

    by Khoi Vinh

    What comes after just reading on iPad? A new form of creation that's much closer to consumption than what we saw on desktops and laptops. Mixel co-founder and CEO Khoi Vinh takes a look at the journey that led him to create Mixel, the world's first social collage app. Its goal is to get non-artists making art, and Vinh will look at the ways in which the social network has met, exceeded and fallen short of that goal.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Texas Ballroom 1-3, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage audio clip

  • Open Art, Open Audiences: The Edinburgh Festivals

    by Andrew Coulton and Kath M Mainland

    Arts festivals are all about bringing people together, creating shared experiences and introducing them to cultural gems that they might not otherwise have found. How can festivals make best use of new technology to develop their audiences, enhance the impact of their content and remain relevant in the Information Age? What role can festival data play in the semantic web, and does it have more to offer than just what's on where? How might social platforms, ticketing innovations and mobile applications help audiences to navigate and explore the content available at a major arts festivals? In 2011 we opened our data to the developer community through www.culturehackscotland.com . Culture Hack Scotland was an outstanding event and was one of the strongest ever demonstrations of the value of open data in the arts. Hear how Edinburgh's Festivals Innovation Lab is beginning to answer some of these questions and explore what value the Edinburgh Festivals, a significant test bed environment, can add to the SXSW community.

    The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the largest arts festival in the world, and works with the other 11 major festivals in the city through Festivals Edinburgh.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon E, AT&T Conference Center

  • The European Tech Art Scene

    by Simona Lodi and Jasmina Tesanovic

    Turin, once the capital of Italian cinema, has created a tech art scene. Turin's "Share Festival" began six years ago as an international fiesta of Internet art, and has since become famous for installations, interventions, provocations and freedom-of-expression issues. Share director Simona Lodi will show video work by Paolo Cirio, Liens Invisibles, Stelarc, Lia, and Lucas Bambozzi. Bruce Sterling and Jasmina Tesanovic will describe the work of judging tech art, and how a Texan and a Serbian gleefully participate in a European creative scene.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 12AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • QR Codes, Technology and a New Era of Fine Art

    by Jeff Wilson

    Throughout history, technology has been responsible for artistic movements often influencing entire genres. Typically, these movements impacted styles, composition, or more subtle, conceptual meaning implied by the work. In recent years, a few, key technical advances have produced an interesting twist changing not simply popular subjects or composition but changing the way we may experience art.This session will look at how today's technology impacts the industry of art, define a digital "art experience", and what it means to extract work off the gallery walls. We will cover what new ways art will be consumed, how it will be distributed and owned, and what it means to be both an artist and an art lover of the future.

    At 1:15pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage audio clip