Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Information on Sunday 11th March

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  • Open Art, Open Audiences: The Edinburgh Festivals

    by Andrew Coulton and Kath M Mainland

    Arts festivals are all about bringing people together, creating shared experiences and introducing them to cultural gems that they might not otherwise have found. How can festivals make best use of new technology to develop their audiences, enhance the impact of their content and remain relevant in the Information Age? What role can festival data play in the semantic web, and does it have more to offer than just what's on where? How might social platforms, ticketing innovations and mobile applications help audiences to navigate and explore the content available at a major arts festivals? In 2011 we opened our data to the developer community through www.culturehackscotland.com . Culture Hack Scotland was an outstanding event and was one of the strongest ever demonstrations of the value of open data in the arts. Hear how Edinburgh's Festivals Innovation Lab is beginning to answer some of these questions and explore what value the Edinburgh Festivals, a significant test bed environment, can add to the SXSW community.

    The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the largest arts festival in the world, and works with the other 11 major festivals in the city through Festivals Edinburgh.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon E, AT&T Conference Center

  • Right to Be Forgotten: Forgiveness or Censorship?

    by Meg Ambrose and Jill Van Matre

    The digital age has eternalized information that was once fleeting, and the Right to be Forgotten has gained traction in the EU. A controversial aspect of these rights is that truthful, newsworthy information residing online may be removed after a certain amount of time in an attempt to make the information private again.

    Two compelling camps have arisen: Preservationists and Deletionists. Preservationists believe the web offers the most comprehensive history of humanity ever collected and feel a duty to protect digital legacies without censorship. Deletionists argue that the web must learn to forget in order to preserve vital societal values and that threats to the dignity and privacy of individuals will create an oppressive networked space.

    The US, the land of opportunity, has not embraced the Right to be Forgotten, but should it? The First Amendment raises significant issues, but how does the value of protected information changes over time. Could privacy ever outweigh expression?

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 8A, Austin Convention Center

  • Beautiful Data? No, That Data is a Sex Machine

    by Stew Langille and Raymond Mooney

    Yes data is beautiful–but SEXY?! That’s right. It’s powerful, self-sufficient; it can write its own ticket. Data doesn’t need you anymore...or does it?We’re all looking for ways to pull useful information from the overwhelming amount of data flooding the Internet. Two solutions have surfaced–dataviz and semantic web. Both are taking on a life of their own but they’re tackling the problem in very different ways.Data visualizations give us the means to understand the multitude of data out there. But what’s next? Ever heard of XBRL? RDF? These and other semantic web technologies are changing the way we understand data. They give data context. Without context, data is meaningless, and data can’t organize itself.Back end semantic web & front end visualizations both make data more usable but require a human catalyst. Are we entering a time that data will make itself more usable by organizing itself contextually and representing itself visually?Moderator: Greg Ebert, Rivet Software

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 616AB, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Digital Immortals: Preserving Life Beyond Death

    by Airdrie Miller, Richard Banks, Evan Carroll, Bill LeFurgy and Adam Ostrow

    When you kick the bucket, you'll leave behind a vast amount of digital information: a lifetime's worth of Tweets, emails, blogs, photos, videos and more. They're the product of a creative life well lived.

    In fact, this information forms a rich archive of who we are and what we think. But in a world of passing technology, will our digital selves simply fade away as the victim of neglect? Or will they live on in perpetuity like the Great Pyramids to be remembered and celebrated?

    Libraries frequently preserve the collections of the significant and famous, but what about the rest of us? Does technology hold the key to widespread digital preservation? Or should we just die and be dead?

    As we think about the future of experiencing the past, how should we prepare? What technology will we need? And what will that mean for society? Join our group of archivists, technologists and interaction designers who are going to discuss the challenges and opportunities of a digitally preserved world.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center