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Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Privacy on Sunday 11th March

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  • We the People: Creating a Consumer's Bill of Rights

    by Shane Green and Anne Bezancon

    Who will determine the future of your privacy and digital life? Will it be Apple, Google, Al Franken, or you?Everyone's talking about all of the data people are creating and how it’s protected – or not. Key Internet players have faced lawsuits and legislative, regulatory and media scrutiny for how they track, share, sell, and retain consumer info. This has created a perfect storm for Congress to lead a charge to protect consumer privacy. But governments are as interested in access to consumer and citizen data as any big company.Shouldn’t we the people have a say in defining these standards? Absolutely.We’ll use this session to create a privacy bill of rights that tackles key issues around data, permissions, transparency, exporting information, and data deletion. We’ll use location based services as the case study, led by leading practitioners in the field.Together, in this interactive session, we’ll create 10 unalienable rights and vote to ratify it for the world to use.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • How to Build Privacy By Design into Web and Mobile

    by Tarik Kurspahic

    Building great online and mobile products is hard enough with a small team and limited resources, so why add to the difficulty by embracing “privacy by design” principles? With so many free, easy web tools available and an “everyone else is doing it” mentality, why take time to create extra user controls and transparency? The reality is your users are starting to understand the issues and will soon demand it. You should demand it too. But most online tools compromise user privacy at some level, and almost none provide the new benefits that result when privacy is baked in from the start. So, what to do? You can build your own tools, requiring time, skill, patience, and functionality trade-offs; pay a third party for their tools; or adapt open source solutions. Or you can shrug your shoulders and roll the dice... In this session, learn how the CTO of Personal, a private personal network and data vault service, has built privacy into the company’s DNA and how you can too.

    At 12:30pm to 12:45pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage audio clip

  • How to Run a Social Site and Not Get Users Killed

    by Sam Gregory, Jillian York, Danny O'Brien and Ahmed Shihab-Eldin

    Facebook helped foment an uprising. Twitter kept the world rapt as revolution unfolded. But for all of their benefits, the use of social networks often puts activists--in Egypt, Syria, China, or even the United States--at great risk. Your privacy policy and terms of use, as well as how you enforce them, could mean life or death for an activist (or an ordinary user) using your site. What can you, the social media company, do to help keep your users safe?

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Right to Be Forgotten: Forgiveness or Censorship?

    by Meg Ambrose and Jill Van Matre

    The digital age has eternalized information that was once fleeting, and the Right to be Forgotten has gained traction in the EU. A controversial aspect of these rights is that truthful, newsworthy information residing online may be removed after a certain amount of time in an attempt to make the information private again.

    Two compelling camps have arisen: Preservationists and Deletionists. Preservationists believe the web offers the most comprehensive history of humanity ever collected and feel a duty to protect digital legacies without censorship. Deletionists argue that the web must learn to forget in order to preserve vital societal values and that threats to the dignity and privacy of individuals will create an oppressive networked space.

    The US, the land of opportunity, has not embraced the Right to be Forgotten, but should it? The First Amendment raises significant issues, but how does the value of protected information changes over time. Could privacy ever outweigh expression?

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 8A, Austin Convention Center

  • Data Is the New Oil: Wealth and Wars on the Web

    by Michael Fertik, DJ Patil, Owen Tripp and John Clippinger

    Oil has an unnerving ability to blow up the economy, cause wars and disrupt ecosystems. It’s a paramount resource and industry creator, spurring trillion dollar economies mining, refining and managing the asset. In the 21st century, we’re experiencing the dawn of a new fuel, also poised to create opportunity and turmoil: data. Multibillion-dollar industries, from search engines to social networking to online advertising, have been built on the aggregation of personal data, information the World Economic Forum likens to a “new type of raw material … on par with capital and labor.” We’re fighting a war on oil now. Will an entirely different war on data soon break out? We believe so.

    The “Data is Oil” project is the brainchild of two personal data experts, Michael Fertik, CEO of Reputation.com and World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, and John Clippinger, Research Scientist at MIT Media Lab. The project’s mission is to encourage mainstream awareness and create a profitable, user-centric ecosystem around the new asset of personal data. This is not just a question of privacy and harm, but an inversion of the web as we know it. Past fortunes were claimed brokering our keystrokes and clicks, but a paradigm shift is eminent. It’s time individuals assert control over their own data. Join Michael Fertik and John Clippinger as they explore the new resource of personal data and the trillion dollar implications for today’s data-dependent world.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 616AB, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • F**k Privacy: Neuromarketing Is the Web's Future

    by Shaina Boone and Joseph Carrabis

    Consumers are uninformed, and consequently paranoid, about data collection and privacy standards. They presume marketers are peering into their personal lives and equate web analysts to identity thieves. What they fail to understand are the hidden costs to cracking down on privacy, for the capitalist and consumer in us all. Privacy restrictions will result in decreased sales, lost jobs, poor content, irrelevant advertising and shitty consumer experiences. It will set digital technology back a decade. One could argue this pro-privacy is almost rooted in anti-capitalism.

    As marketers and advertisers, we only stand to lose. Advancements in neuromarketing and analytics are making great strides to give those very same consumers truly personalized digital experience across all mediums. We envision experiences that put their needs before those of brands and actually improve lives.

    If there was ever a time to fight ignorance, it’s now. Join us for a heated debate over this brewing topic.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • Big Data: Privacy Threat or Business Model?

    by Lillie Coney, Molly Wood, Declan Mccullagh, Jay Stanley and Will DeVries

    Technological innovation has dramatically increased the types andvolume of personal information created and captured. Social networks,mobile devices, thermostats, cars, even kitchen appliances collect andaggregate data from and about users. Personal data is among the mostvaluable assets for the current crop of tech startups. On the darkside, consumers have very little conception of the amount of data theyare creating and sharing and little appreciation of the potential risksand harms. On the bright side, data-based innovation can lead to newproducts, more efficiency, and lower costs. How can we protectourselves, without overreacting, in the age of data abundance? Can wetrust in the market to deliver the appropriate controls and usereducation, or do we need regulatory intervention? This session is sponsored by CNET / CBS Interactive.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Longhorn, Omni Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

  • On the Internet, Everyone Knows You're a Dog

    by Michael Sippey, Rick Webb, Jessica Zollman, Heather Champ and Ted Rheingold

    As former Representative Anthony Weiner discovered the hard way, remaining anonymous in this hyper-social world is becoming nearlyimpossible. But what sucks for Anthony Wiener has been great for conversations on the Web – with the rise of authenticated platforms, anonymous comments and posts are giving way to real dialogs between authors and their audiences.
    For example, when comments on popular sites like TechCrunch became tied to real Facebook profiles, the experience went from a juvenile insult-fest to a civil value-add information exchange. There’s undoubtedly progress to be made, but authentication and social platforms are giving us a glimpse of what the future holds: low friction ways to connect your opinion to a piece of content, easier ways to see what your friends care about, and better ways to insert your POV.
    For better or worse, it’s becoming harder to remain anonymous online. In this panel discussion, we will discuss how technology is changing online self-expression.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Personal Identity Management: Why It Matters

    by Fatemeh Khatibloo

    The marketing ecosystem as it stands is unsustainable. Consumers don’t trust marketers to respect their privacy, and unfortunately, marketers have done a poor job explaining how data is collected, managed and applied to improve the customer experience.

    Meanwhile, as consumers leave behind an exponentially growing digital footprint, they’re also becoming increasingly aware that marketers use and sell this data for financial gain. As a result, a nascent industry is developing around consumers’ desire for transparency, portability, privacy and tangible benefits.

    In this session, we’ll share results of research aimed at understanding consumers’ motivators, concerns, and awareness of this ecosystem. We’ll make sense of terms like “VRM,” “data locker,” “personal cloud” and “trust framework,” and provide an overview of the Identity Ecosystem, including the operating models, the frontrunners in each, and how interactive marketers can get ahead of the curve.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • Security and Privacy in Social Networks

    by Eva Galperin and John Adams

    This panel will explore the interplay between user privacy, social networking sites, law enforcement, and the teams of people that are tasked with both enforcing and protecting the users of these sites. We'll discuss best practices for protecting your company and your users and if you are a frequent user of social networking sites, you can learn how minimize the information that can be exposed about you in your travels online. We'll show you how we fight for the users, every day.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Lone Star, Omni Downtown