Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Privacy on Tuesday 13th March

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  • How the Wallet Was Won: The End of Paper Receipts

    by Scott Brady, David Barrett, Colleen Taylor and Jae Kim

    Our wallets are one of the last remaining bastions of a pre-digital lifestyle, relics of an era of payment that has since come and gone.

    Coupons are now Groupons, rewards cards are digitally stored on our smartphones and Square wants to power all our payments. With all these new ways to slim down and streamline our wallets, why are we still getting a paper receipt every time we check out at the grocery store? With so much progress, why are men still sporting the infamous Costanza bulge and women toting around pocketbooks that look like small filing cabinets? As more commerce shifts from offline to online, and even offline retailers are experimenting with digital marketing & transactions, the Costanza wallet is due for a makeover.

    What are the brands and startups that are changing how we think about receipts? What will the implications of Big Data and privacy be in this transition? And what systems will ultimately come to define how we all chronicle our shopping experiences moving forward?

    Our wallets have been ceding themselves over to the digital age for quite some time now. It’s about time we took that final leap and made the upgrade to Wallet 2.0.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Rio Grande, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

  • Social Media Boundaries: Personal/Personnel Policy

    by Vanessa Rhinesmith, Debra Askanase, Jess Main and Amy Sample Ward

    As our networks expand, our profiles get more public, and our work requires a human face, where do we draw the line between personal and professional identities online? How do we maintain those boundaries for our community members? How do we respond to attacks, opportunities, and over-shares online? When does over-sharing hurt the community? When should you share your own personal stories as a manager, or personally reach out to community members?

    Growing and cultivating an active community also requires that the community manager walk the fine line of personal and professional sharing. Every community manager wonders when and how to professionally cultivate leaders and members to create a thriving community while still being personal. On the reverse side, sometimes community members share too much, which can hurt the health of the community.

    This panel will address these questions and more from experience in nonprofit and public media sectors.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

  • Social Shopping: The Zeros & Ones Changing Fashion

    by Caroline Waxler

    With the developments in social shopping such as real time social shopping sites, Facebook shopping, and location-based check-ins, recommendations, and deals, the fashion industry is catering to the customer like never before. But how social can—and should—shopping get? While consumers may want to consume together, over-sharing of information is all too easy. Apple’s Ping, Facebook’s Beacon and Blippy are but three familiar examples.This core conversation will discuss how privacy fits in and explores the question of just who is safe guarding the community.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Driskill Ballroom, Driskill Hotel

  • Mobile Privacy: Developer Kits & Tips

    by Chris Conley, Nick Doty, Tim Vetter, Kevin Mahaffey and Tara Whalen

    There are tools and tutorials out there to teach developers all sorts of things about mobile apps, taking them from "Hello World!" to sophisticated products ready for the big time. But if you want help building privacy into your app, that's a lot harder to find.

    This workshop seeks to change that. Through demos of existing resources and Q&A with attendees, we will provide you with the tools and skills you need to build the next killer mobile app while protecting your users' privacy and avoiding the media firestorms and government investigations that can kill a fledgling product.

    We'll include hands-on demos of existing apps and developer kits and tools that help you think through and address the privacy implications of the data you collect and use. We'll also discuss what other resources are needed to give designers and developers the ability to meet their deadlines, pull in revenue, and still stand up for their users' privacy.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Automobile As Network Node

    by Beth Hill, Gerard M Stegmaier, Michelle Avary and Nick Pudar

    This is a Continuing Legal Education panel: Automobiles are increasingly connected to computer networks and are used to collect, use and share vehicle-related information. They also provide a delivery mechanism for driving, entertainment and other content and information. This panel will discuss legal issues arising out of and related to the collection, use and disclosure of vehicle-related information and related emerging legal issues of data use in or related to vehicles.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

  • Help! I Have an Internet Stalker or Blackmailer!

    by Jonathan Zittrain and Lisa Borodkin

    The benevolent Internet promotes expression, collaboration and experimentation. But the current legal scheme can make the Internet a place where digital tracks persist long after their intended use. In a world of d0xing and h8ing, we face a critical juncture for reconciling freedom of speech with privacy.

    This panel will review of norms of online and offline conduct and suggest possible ways of striking a balance, without breaking the Internet along the way.

    1. Reputation Bankruptcy may be an option to rehabilitate a ruined reputation in the reputation economy, and a solution to peer-to-peer privacy problems.

    2. (Re)Contextualization has pros and cons as a remedy in a legal scheme when third-party online speech is treated differently from printed speech.

    3. Disownership of Content: Should "disown this" features become the norm, allowing users to release content into the wild?

    4. Ephemerality: Should certain types of content be designed to degrade over time?

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Capital Ballroom A, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin