Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Analytics

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Friday 9th March 2012

  • Design from the Gut: Dangerous or Differentiator?

    by Laurel Hechanova, Naz Hamid, Phil Coffman, William Couch and Jane Leibrock

    The internet is a never-ending data source. Through it we are able to monitor visitor activity, study traffic patterns, and use these analytics to help guide users in the directions we want. Usability testing gives us behavioral information which can either affirm design decisions or inform necessary changes. Research and analytics go a long way in selling a creative direction to clients who are focused on engaging with their customers and in how marketing dollars will impact their bottom line. But what about a designer's instinct—that moment when a designer just knows what they're building is right? When and how do their years of professional experience, inspirational collections, and life observations become deciding factors? Learn from a panel of design veterans, with experience that ranges from client services to product development, about past experiences and their personal stance on the subject.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom BC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

Saturday 10th March 2012

  • I Used Data Analytics to Game Online Dating

    by Amy Webb

    I was tired of terrible first dates. When I decided to try online dating, I wasn’t going to let my profile mugshot and a few lines about me decide my fate. Instead, I did what any enterprising young woman in my position would do: I gamed the system! I created a series of male user profiles, registered a bunch of accounts and logged in as men. For weeks, I studied all the women using that service and collected data on the ones who seemed most popular.

    I eventually compiled everything into a deep data analysis. Then, I logged back into the service...this time as a woman...and created a profile using my own information, but skewed to the trends I uncovered. Within a week I had the most popular profile on the service. Two months later I was dating the person who would later become my husband.

    What I learned: Most people don't understand their audiences. In this session, I’ll detail how I gamed online dating...and what that means for anyone trying to land a committed relationship with their users.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Driskill Ballroom, Driskill Hotel

  • How Your Data Can Predict the Future

    by Becky Wang

    Today, we have data – lots of it. We can process information – in many ways. We have models to understand our process. With these tools and a dash of creativity, we are discovering surprising patterns of human behavior and by extension, a way to accurately predict our desires and our future. In fact, we can quantify movements, behaviors, desires, and moods on a scale that wasn’t possible before a series of advances in processing power, developments in psychology, the science of social networks and collaboration, and most importantly, access to data. As we have evolved from Web 1.0 to 4.0 – in this anticipatory era – what will we dream up next? Beyond addressability and ad relevance, marketing initiatives and product development, how else can businesses utilize these advances? In advertising, industry, & humanity, can we make the leap from inductive logic to intuition? Can we supplement our brain mechanics with these new tools to finally predict what makes us happy?

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capital Ballroom B, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • Rise of Analytics: Impacting the Editorial Process?

    by Jacob Young and Chris Reynolds

    The rapid proliferation of choices at the readers' fingertips for accessing content has made the editor's job more complicated than ever. Behavioral analytics will uncover when readers want what content, where they are when they want it, and if they want it on their phones, tablets, or PCs. Understanding user behavior across these platforms will not only guide the editor on how to deliver digital and mobile content but also offer new insights on how to deliver traditional, offline content to improve the readers' overall experience with the brand.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • LEAN STARTUP: Check Yo-Self Before U Wreck Yo-Self, Startup Metrics of the Masters

    by Joe Zadeh, Zach Nies, Aaron Batalion, Thomas Korte and Dharmesh Shah

    Startup Case Studies' from Airbnb, LivingSocial, HubSpot, & Rally Software on measuring success including lessons learned with pivots, metrics, and growth.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Salon C, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage slide deck

Monday 12th March 2012

  • Utah.gov: Breaking the Mold for eGovernment

    by David Fletcher, Hillary Hartley and Jonathan Higley

    Utah.gov's recent redesign delivers a fully immersive, search-centric, data-driven, and user sourced experience. Find out how the team in Utah has redefined online government using emerging technology, a cutting-edge layout and over four years of analytics.

    The Utah.gov’s team revolutionized what a government search can be; displaying more enriched information based on location and time relevance and integrating social media at every level. User searches on Utah.Gov display immediately and include services, forms, jobs, and related agencies.

    The team also leveraged technology to address browser variance, as Utah.gov saw a 400% increase in non-desktop use in the past two years. The new site delivers optimal experience to users regardless of device or browser.

    This panel will discuss the team's process, along with the research and analytics that supported the design choices which led to the creation of the new "gold standard for government."

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon C, AT&T Conference Center

  • Media Measurement: Science, Art or a Load of Crap

    by Ken Shuman, Kelly Mills, David Armano and Brendan Lewis

    We are quickly moving to a time where PR is transitioning from a cost center to a highly measurable conduit to client/customer acquisition tool. Accountability and measurement is key in all campaigns from product launches to company profiles and beyond. Whether you are on the agency side or lead an internal pr department, measuring pr success has never been easier.

    PR used to be described as an art but now it is a science. In the past, you would look at the number of eyeballs that “should” have seen an article or the total number of articles an announcement received. Both of these are pointless measurements especially in this day and age where you can precisely measure the impact of a companies news and social campaigns.
    In our day-to-day lives, we use Omniture to determine which articles lead to the most clicks to your website. We use Radian 6 to determine the influence your announcement had throughout social platforms. We leverage Wildfire Interactive to compare the growth of fans and followers against the competition. We use Facebook Insights and url shorteners to see how company and product announcements have directly increased fans.

    Measuring success and sharing these insights with clients or your CEO/CMO can lead to bigger budgets, more effective campaigns and help raise awareness across organizations about the impact communications are having on the company’s success.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Capital Ballroom A, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

    Coverage audio clip

Tuesday 13th March 2012

  • Beyond a Thousand Words: Accessible Complex Data

    by Susann Keohane and Brian Cragun

    Our world is becoming increasingly intelligent, interconnected, and instrumented, resulting in massive amounts of data being collected. This data is a treasure trove of information that can be mined to improve service, increase sales, or make operations more efficient. Analysis of such large amounts of data, often called analytics, is increasingly desired by governments and businesses alike. Yet getting useful information from such large amounts of data is a daunting task. Analytics often relies on real-time visual renderings that allow users to quickly spot trends and gain insights. These visual renderings tend to be complex charts (bar, line, scatter, or bubble charts, timelines, node diagrams, etc.) or editable node diagrams. Visual charts can be challenging to understand, especially for persons with disabilities. This presentation describes some of the accessibility challenges of charts, large datasets, and node diagrams and some techniques to make them more accessible and usable by people with disabilities.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip