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Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Crowdsourcing

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Saturday 10th March 2012

  • Crowdsourcing a Revolution: Can We Fix Healthcare?

    by Indu Subaiya, Aman Bhandari, Eileen Bartholomew, Jeffrey Davis and Cristin Dorgelo

    Healthcare is 18% of US GDP and will be 37% by 2050, if nothing changes. We must reinvent how we deliver healthcare. In the past year, prizes and challenges have come in to vogue in the health sector. Prizes and challenges have a long history of benefiting humanity and driving major breakthroughs, for example a prize was used to incentivize the first flight across the Atlantic. Prizes are effective at crowdsourcing innovation, accelerating progress, and attracting new talent. Some of the leading prize evangelists will describe their platforms from big dollar prizes to more modest amounts along with lessons learned. The XPrize Foundation is launching a bid to fund a $10M XPrize for a Tricoder device; Health 2.0 has launched over 25 challenges with over 150 teams; NASA has built and open innovation strategy for health and the government is seeding grand challenges for global health. We are in the early stage of challenges for health and most are focused on apps, games, and data visualizations. Come hear how we can use challenges to fix healthcare, spur new business models, and avoid prize and app fatigue. This Future of Health Track is sponsored by Aetna.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Classroom 204, AT&T Conference Center

  • Crowd Sourcing Community Projects Like Tom Sawyer

    by Dave Olson

    Customers are part of your culture. By inviting them to participate in your campaigns and community, you can speed progress, gain candid market insight, and have some fun. This conversation will share tips about wrangling your passionate users to help with specific tasks for mutual benefit. The tips and tactics will include: understanding motivations, providing rewards, setting boundaries, understanding types of volunteers, organizing disappearing task forces, avoiding "cat herding,” and thwarting confusion and conflicts.

    Practical examples will include: crowd-sourcing a multi-language software translation project; organizing citizen reporting at an Olympic Games; creating participatory contests to produce content and assets; identifying perpetrators and looters in a riot; raising relief money under difficult circumstances; and, rapidly helping victims in disaster zones.

    From the examples, we’ll discuss methods for channeling the passion of audiences into tangible results in much the same manner as Tom Sawyer recruited his fishing pals to help whitewash his fence.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol View North, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Crowdsourcing Science

    by Adrien Treuille

    This session will talk about computer games than enable game players across the world to help solve scientific problems. Adrien co-created EteRNA and Foldit, computer games where users design and fold real biomolecules and, as a result, help reveal better ways for drugs to target diseases. He has modeled complex phenomena from fluid dynamics to crowd motion to macromolecules. Adrien received an NSF CAREER Award, was included in the MIT Technology Review Top 35 Innovators Under 35, had his work featured in The New York Times, and has published in Nature. His work brings crowdsourcing, games and advanced simulation techniques together to advance key areas of engineering and medicine. http://poptech.org/popcasts/adri...

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Texas Ballroom 1-3, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage audio clip

  • Crowdsourcing Cancer Support: A Love Story

    by Trisha Creekmore and David Creekmore

    Cancer care and support is changing dramatically as blogging, social media, facebook and mmo gaming become mass media. Trisha Creekmore, aka Tinkerhell, a mother, wife and digital denizen since 1995, has had breast cancer twice. The first diagnosis in 2004 was hard and lonely. The second diagnosis in 2010 was harder, but not lonely. Trisha and her husband David found the content on health Web sites unhelpful and online disease-specific support groups depressing. So they made up their own plan, harnessing the power of facebook, the mmo Warhammer and thousands of strangers to create Cancerpalooza. David blogged every week. His plan was to keep family and friends informed, but the blog and the community it created became much more than the sum of their parts, inspiring and bringing value to complete strangers, the entire mmorpg community and even rockstars like Mike Patton and Ozzy Osbourne. But not in an annoying social-media-positive-sharing way. More in a FML-WTF-LOL way. This Future of Health Track is sponsored by Aetna.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Classroom 204, AT&T Conference Center

  • Crowd Sourced & Collaborative Story-Writing

    by Stephen Bradley

    User-generated content (UGC) has changed the face of the entertainment world forever. Nearly every form of media has enjoyed a "break-out" moment when consumer content began to present a serious alternative to professionally-developed content for market and mind share. Break-through companies like Flickr, CD Baby, YouTube and Zynga have led the charge for every form of media entertainment from photos to video to music to video games... all except books.

    The explosive growth of e-readers and e-books is a strong endorsement of consumer demand to both publish and consume written work. Historically, writing and publishing a complete book has been a daunting proposition for the average consumer - but today non-professional enthusiasts have the opportunity to participate with others in the creation of new types of stories that build on the contributions and inspiration of many... stories that develop and unfold before their eyes, where they are both creator and consumer at once.

    At 5:45pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

Sunday 11th March 2012

  • Crowdsourcing Government: Why Access Matters

    by Tim Kelsey, Caroline Mauldin and Rakesh Rajani

    A public right to data is key to unlocking the biggest enterprise opportunity of our time: integrating social media with public services. Open government combines transparency with citizen participation. This is the future of government. The Open Government Partnership is a new international initiative - bringing together more than 50 countries and international civil society - to share best practice in beating corruption, improving social justice and driving growth and innovation. The UK has put Transparency at the heart of its vision of social and economic growth and is one of the founder members of the OGP. This session also hears from other key founders of the OGP from around the world – including Samantha Power, special assistant to President Barack Obama and the architect of the initiative and Rakesh Rajani, a global civil society leader. The Future is Open: find out how to become an Open Government pioneer.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon C, AT&T Conference Center

  • Public Lab: Mapping, DIY Activism & Civic Science

    by Jennifer Hudon, Mathew Lippincott, Gregory Foster and Shannon Dosemagen

    Are you embroiled in an cartographic dispute? Do you disagree with the official version of your geography? Do you need a up-to-date map of your area of interest?From the BP Oil Spill to the Gowanus Canal Super Fund site, Grassroots Mapping and the Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science work to empower citizens around the world. Communities engage in citizen cartography and create aerial images with low-cost, DIY, open sourced technologies. This method of mapping creates on-demand imagery that’s 30 to 50 times higher resolution than what’s available via Google Maps. It allows people to document, to lobby and to enact change in their neighborhoods. The Public Laboratory community has expanded to organize projects around the world. Recently recognized with the award of $500,000 Knight Foundation grant, that work continues to expand. We’ll discuss the unique challenges and obstacles of scaling citizen science, IRL community development work, and online technology engagement.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • What Civil Society Can Learn from Social Web

    by Daniel Hengeveld, Ben Berkowitz, Lenny Rachitsky, Doug Matthews and Kathryn Fink

    From Meet(ing)Up to borrowing Neighbor('s)Goods, civil society has come a long way since the days of Locke and Hobbes. In this era of 'Civil Society 2.0,' social web tools continue to transform local landscapes across the globe, connecting the digital with the physical with a few clicks of the mouse. But does the social web enable more informed and engaged communities? More important, does it enact significant offline change? With these questions in mind, this panel will explore how the social web connects individuals over shared interests in real time, from fixing pesky potholes to discovering drink specials at the local pub. Considering this convergence of technology and public space, it will also discuss how the social web facilitates co-presence and works to create more efficient and sustainable neighborhoods. Through online interaction, crowdsourcing tools allow us to see through the eyes and hear through the ears of people we haven’t physically met yet--emphasis on the "yet."

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capital Ballroom, Omni Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

  • Digital Health: Borrow from Developing Countries?

    by Andre Blackman and Jaspal Sandhu

    Can novel health applications in developing countries spark health innovation in the United States? Massive experimentation in mobile and interactive health is taking place overseas, often targeting poor populations in poor countries. Consider several current examples: 1) a smart card enabled health savings scheme for uninsured mothers-to-be; 2) a crowdsourcing application to identify medicine stockouts in real-time; and 3) a viral model for peer sharing audio health content using mobile phones and traditional social networks. These are services from just one country: Kenya. Worldwide, mobile and interactive innovations represent fundamental shifts in how we think about health and healthcare. These innovations are leapfrogging traditional models. What can we adapt to the US health system (and market) in the next 2-3 years?

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

Monday 12th March 2012

  • The Open-Source Cult(ure) of Hatsune Miku

    by Alex Leavitt

    When the Web unites millions of users into large networks around creative and free new media practices, how does this "open source culture" challenge assumptions about the production of content and the use of online social platforms?Vocaloid is a music production software from Japan that synthesizes voices for songs. In 2007, Crypton Future Media released Hatsune Miku, a young, female version of Vocaloid. Thousands of musicians use the software and character to make innovative songs and videos, which are circulated on Nico Nico Douga & YouTube for free, and many receive millions of hits within weeks. Vocaloid has helped amateur musicians land professional contracts, produced live concerts with holographic singers, and made Miku into a global virtual idol.This talk looks at one case study of a peer-produced media franchise that exploded into a global phenomenon using social media and free distribution, and the issues and successes of networked creative production.

    At 11:45am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Crowdsourced Creative: Friend to Advertising?

    by Neil Perry

    Perhaps no segment of interactive marketing is as provocative as crowdsourcing, a rapidly emerging approach to media creation that can cut traditional production costs by as much as 90% and is having profound effects on in-house and agency marketers alike. Hear pros and cons and see real-life examples, case studies, and lessons from the perspectives of leading global brands, agencies and crowdsourcing production companies on how the crowd is going mainstream and what it could all mean to you. Joining Neil will be Robb Miller, Director of Marketing for Site Content, Dell.com.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • Crowdsourcing: Next Gen Consumers in the Driver's Seat

    by Nick Pudar, Sara Leblanc, Anne Hubert and Andrew Dinsdale

    At 100 million strong, Millennials are the biggest generation in American history. They possess nearly a trillion dollars in spending power. They're flipping every social custom and convention known to man on its head. You can't beat them so how can you join them?Chevrolet, in partnership with MTV through its swat team Scratch, is re-imagining the automotive experience from concepts to ownership and recently put young buyers in charge of product planning through two concept coupes. Taking a cue from the software industry, the Chevrolet concepts serve as prototypes to start a discussion, to iterate and co-create the future of transportation. This isn’t just a slight change in workflow, it’s a complete reboot with direct consumer input taking center stage. Hear Director of GM Advanced Design Frank Saucedo and Viacom Media Networks' Senior Vice President of Scratch Anne Hubert discuss how the cars and relationships came to be and how the process will transform Chevrolet for the future.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • CrowdTV: Crowd-Sourcing Documentaries

    by Kylee Ingram

    CrowdTV is steaming ahead with the next iteration of crowd-sourcing, and is asking viewers to collaborate in deciding the direction and content of the documentary. For our pilot we gave the online community bare bones topic - water issues in Western Sydney. But beyond that, we threw open the doors to anyone who wants to have a say with the hope the result would be fun and a little bit gritty, but when starting out we had no idea what the outcome would be.

    Participants gain points for contributing, such as through posting ideas or voting, and these points equate to credits in the film. This community involvement continues through every step of the production, with users also able to contribute research, vote on edit choices, and contribute or choose graphics and music.

    Getting funding bodies interested in the idea proved difficult, as it was hard to pitch an idea for which the very point is that no one knows what it will look like yet. But it was the government and community partners got it immediately. They could see the value of community involvement as an end in itself, whereas the other bodies had been solely focused on the documentary.

    We believe CrowdTV has the potential to encourage a broader level of community involvement than other approaches that are all about UGC- the model can be applied to any factual production.

    At 12:30pm to 12:45pm, Monday 12th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Getting a Crowd to Work for You: For Pay or Play?

    by Anthony Goldbloom and Lukas Biewald

    Crowdsourcing companies like CrowdFlower have access to more than two million contributors to get real work done, meanwhile companies like Kaggle can tap into the world's best data scientists to call upon their intellectual property to solve real world challenges. So what makes this crowd work? Is it money or something greater?Today, workers are willing to do real work for virtual compensation just as much as they are willing to work for cold-hard cash. In this presentation Lukas Biewald, Founder of CrowdFlower, and Anthony Goldbloom, Founder of Kaggle, discuss the merging incentives of the crowd worker. What is the essential driving force for workers to accomplish tasks for real or virtual work? What does the crowdsourcing worker want more in exchange for their work- real or virtual compensation?

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Brazos, Marriott Courtyard Austin Downtown/Convention Center

  • Open Innovation: Millions of Us Solving Problems

    by Dwayne Spradlin, Jacob Ward and Jack Hughes

    Co-presentation from Dwayne Spradlin of InnoCentive & Jack Hughes of TopCoder, Inc., leaders in the open innovation market. Led by Jacob Ward of Popular Science magazine, the panel will discuss how open innovation and crowdsourcing can transform your business, either through a breakthrough ‘eureka‘ idea or continuous and incremental improvement of a product or service. Find out what companies from Netflix to NASA to Toyota have gained from putting their biggest challenges out in front of the general public, and how you can do the same. This practical and candid conversation will uncover the key issues you need to address when incorporating open innovation communities into your own business plans, and how professional problem-solving communities will evolve in the coming years.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

Tuesday 13th March 2012

  • Cool Like You, Gov Private Sector Envy

    by Emily Wright-Moore, Kevin Curry, Julio Gonzalez, Aurelio Tinio and Matthew Esquibel

    Will we someday look to the government technologist as a Web superstar? An innovation idol? A technology trailblazer?

    In this session we will explore how government technologists deal with the demands of meeting customer needs in a world where private industry sets the pace. Can government ever be as cool as their corporate counterparts? Are the challenges of doing more with less, attracting emerging talent and maneuvering through excessive politics and bureaucracy too much to overcome?

    New and groundbreaking partnerships between government and private sector, non-profits and community groups may provide the answers to these questions. Fellowship programs like Code for America, community crowd sourcing like Austin’s OpenAustin and business partnerships may just give the government geek a shot at being one of the cool kids.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon B, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Crowdsource This! Harnessing the Crowd for Content

    by Jason Karas, Rich Barton and Brad Gerstner

    Reviews are so Web 2.0 – the next generation of crowdsourcing goes well beyond a simple user-generated review. But, how can companies utilize the power of the crowd to build content and, ultimately, their business? Does the power of the crowd still have value in today’s web and mobile economy? What kind of information can be mined, and what results can realistically be expected from content supplied by users? Crowdsource experts will discuss the pros and cons of crowdsourcing and the types of content that can be solicited and mined from users, which can help alleviate overall business costs, and cover the possible business implications of relying on crowdsourced information.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol