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Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Privacy

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Friday 9th March 2012

  • The Cloud as Skynet: Conquering Digital Overload

    by Steve Rosenbaum

    Everybody talks about the “cloud” as if it is a digital savior. A beautiful white fluffy (free) cloud on a blue-sky day. Sounds nice, huh? But what if it’s a storm cloud? Today – there is a mad rush to move pictures, video, and event private data to the cloud. We live in a world today of constant connection. We’re blessed with unlimited access to pervasive communications. We are, in fact, shifting from an era of mere content abundance to an avalanche of undifferentiated data. Our hard drives runneth over. So - you can't blame your self for wanting to move to the cloud. Unlimited space for all your crap - and free. Who wouldn't sign up? Today the noisy web has resulted in the emergence of a handful of private, walled garden webs. A closed web. Will our cloud providers become information overloads? Can we save the web from privatization, and regain control over our data and our identities? Only if we move fast. Before ‘Big Data’ becomes ‘Big Government.’ Find out how digital ‘overload’ can insure power in the human web.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom EF, Austin Convention Center

Saturday 10th March 2012

  • Can Privacy Bootcamp Firm Up Your Bottom Line?

    by Elinor Mills, Nicole Ozer, Ki Mae Heussner and Raman Khanna

    From Apple to Zynga, privacy and security have dominated the headlines this year. Legislators, regulators, investors, the press, and the public are all tuning into these issues.

    Get the inside track from ACLU lawyers, venture capitalists, technologists, and tech journalists about why and how to avoid mistakes that have landed other companies in hot water and make early decisions that are good for customers and good for the bottom line. This session is part of the Big Data Track sponsored by Gemalto.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Salon FG, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

  • Nicole Ozer Book Signing

    by Nicole Ozer

    Nicole Ozer signs her book ‘Privacy & Free Speech: It’s Good for Business’ at the SXSW book store.

    ‘Privacy & Free Speech’ analyzes what companies have done right – and wrong- and offers hands on tipsand analysis of how startups can save time, money, and reputation by baking in privacy and free speech protections into the business development process.

    At 11:00am to 11:15am, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom G Foyer, Austin Convention Center

  • Securing Your Data in a Target-Rich Environment

    by Darren Kitchen

    Each year, thousands of technophiles descend upon Austin, bringing Internet-connected laptops, phones and tablets with them, and most of them think very little about keeping their personal communications secure. Open wireless networks in the convention center – and in hotels, bars and coffee shops – offer a convenient way to keep in touch with home, but also leave any data that is transmitted over those networks open to snooping by malicious individuals. In this session, host of Revision3 podcast Hak.5 and regular contributor on the TWiT network, Darren Kitchen, will walk attendees through live demonstrations of many ways in which their personal data are vulnerable while connected to the Internet at SXSW, and the steps they can take to keep that data private and safe. The tips and information from this session will benefit those who attend not only while they are at SXSW, but any time they sit down at their own local coffee shop and open up their laptop to fire off some email.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Citadel, Driskill Hotel

    Coverage audio clip

  • Fighting for Your Users Without Becoming a Target

    by Corynne McSherry, Randy Cadenhead, Christopher Mooney and Ethan Oberman

    The Internet is a fantastic resource for sharing and storing ideas, information, and creative works. But users -- individuals and companies -- can't take advantage of that bounty without help from a network of large and small service providers, from social media services like Facebook to storage services such as DropBox and SpiderOak. Too often, these providers are cowed by legal threats into taking down perfectly legal material (like the Facebook page you use to network for your business) or revealing private information about their users. How can you earn your users' loyalty by doing better, and how can you help ensure that the services on which you rely do right by you and your customers? What legal risks do you need to watch out for, and how can you make them go away? A group of experienced lawyers and business owners will help you answer these questions from a legal and practical perspective.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capital Ballroom, Omni Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

Sunday 11th March 2012

  • We the People: Creating a Consumer's Bill of Rights

    by Shane Green and Anne Bezancon

    Who will determine the future of your privacy and digital life? Will it be Apple, Google, Al Franken, or you?Everyone's talking about all of the data people are creating and how it’s protected – or not. Key Internet players have faced lawsuits and legislative, regulatory and media scrutiny for how they track, share, sell, and retain consumer info. This has created a perfect storm for Congress to lead a charge to protect consumer privacy. But governments are as interested in access to consumer and citizen data as any big company.Shouldn’t we the people have a say in defining these standards? Absolutely.We’ll use this session to create a privacy bill of rights that tackles key issues around data, permissions, transparency, exporting information, and data deletion. We’ll use location based services as the case study, led by leading practitioners in the field.Together, in this interactive session, we’ll create 10 unalienable rights and vote to ratify it for the world to use.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • How to Build Privacy By Design into Web and Mobile

    by Tarik Kurspahic

    Building great online and mobile products is hard enough with a small team and limited resources, so why add to the difficulty by embracing “privacy by design” principles? With so many free, easy web tools available and an “everyone else is doing it” mentality, why take time to create extra user controls and transparency? The reality is your users are starting to understand the issues and will soon demand it. You should demand it too. But most online tools compromise user privacy at some level, and almost none provide the new benefits that result when privacy is baked in from the start. So, what to do? You can build your own tools, requiring time, skill, patience, and functionality trade-offs; pay a third party for their tools; or adapt open source solutions. Or you can shrug your shoulders and roll the dice... In this session, learn how the CTO of Personal, a private personal network and data vault service, has built privacy into the company’s DNA and how you can too.

    At 12:30pm to 12:45pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

    Coverage audio clip

  • How to Run a Social Site and Not Get Users Killed

    by Sam Gregory, Jillian York, Danny O'Brien and Ahmed Shihab-Eldin

    Facebook helped foment an uprising. Twitter kept the world rapt as revolution unfolded. But for all of their benefits, the use of social networks often puts activists--in Egypt, Syria, China, or even the United States--at great risk. Your privacy policy and terms of use, as well as how you enforce them, could mean life or death for an activist (or an ordinary user) using your site. What can you, the social media company, do to help keep your users safe?

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Right to Be Forgotten: Forgiveness or Censorship?

    by Meg Ambrose and Jill Van Matre

    The digital age has eternalized information that was once fleeting, and the Right to be Forgotten has gained traction in the EU. A controversial aspect of these rights is that truthful, newsworthy information residing online may be removed after a certain amount of time in an attempt to make the information private again.

    Two compelling camps have arisen: Preservationists and Deletionists. Preservationists believe the web offers the most comprehensive history of humanity ever collected and feel a duty to protect digital legacies without censorship. Deletionists argue that the web must learn to forget in order to preserve vital societal values and that threats to the dignity and privacy of individuals will create an oppressive networked space.

    The US, the land of opportunity, has not embraced the Right to be Forgotten, but should it? The First Amendment raises significant issues, but how does the value of protected information changes over time. Could privacy ever outweigh expression?

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 8A, Austin Convention Center

  • Data Is the New Oil: Wealth and Wars on the Web

    by Michael Fertik, DJ Patil, Owen Tripp and John Clippinger

    Oil has an unnerving ability to blow up the economy, cause wars and disrupt ecosystems. It’s a paramount resource and industry creator, spurring trillion dollar economies mining, refining and managing the asset. In the 21st century, we’re experiencing the dawn of a new fuel, also poised to create opportunity and turmoil: data. Multibillion-dollar industries, from search engines to social networking to online advertising, have been built on the aggregation of personal data, information the World Economic Forum likens to a “new type of raw material … on par with capital and labor.” We’re fighting a war on oil now. Will an entirely different war on data soon break out? We believe so.

    The “Data is Oil” project is the brainchild of two personal data experts, Michael Fertik, CEO of Reputation.com and World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, and John Clippinger, Research Scientist at MIT Media Lab. The project’s mission is to encourage mainstream awareness and create a profitable, user-centric ecosystem around the new asset of personal data. This is not just a question of privacy and harm, but an inversion of the web as we know it. Past fortunes were claimed brokering our keystrokes and clicks, but a paradigm shift is eminent. It’s time individuals assert control over their own data. Join Michael Fertik and John Clippinger as they explore the new resource of personal data and the trillion dollar implications for today’s data-dependent world.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Room 616AB, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • F**k Privacy: Neuromarketing Is the Web's Future

    by Shaina Boone and Joseph Carrabis

    Consumers are uninformed, and consequently paranoid, about data collection and privacy standards. They presume marketers are peering into their personal lives and equate web analysts to identity thieves. What they fail to understand are the hidden costs to cracking down on privacy, for the capitalist and consumer in us all. Privacy restrictions will result in decreased sales, lost jobs, poor content, irrelevant advertising and shitty consumer experiences. It will set digital technology back a decade. One could argue this pro-privacy is almost rooted in anti-capitalism.

    As marketers and advertisers, we only stand to lose. Advancements in neuromarketing and analytics are making great strides to give those very same consumers truly personalized digital experience across all mediums. We envision experiences that put their needs before those of brands and actually improve lives.

    If there was ever a time to fight ignorance, it’s now. Join us for a heated debate over this brewing topic.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • Big Data: Privacy Threat or Business Model?

    by Lillie Coney, Molly Wood, Declan Mccullagh, Jay Stanley and Will DeVries

    Technological innovation has dramatically increased the types andvolume of personal information created and captured. Social networks,mobile devices, thermostats, cars, even kitchen appliances collect andaggregate data from and about users. Personal data is among the mostvaluable assets for the current crop of tech startups. On the darkside, consumers have very little conception of the amount of data theyare creating and sharing and little appreciation of the potential risksand harms. On the bright side, data-based innovation can lead to newproducts, more efficiency, and lower costs. How can we protectourselves, without overreacting, in the age of data abundance? Can wetrust in the market to deliver the appropriate controls and usereducation, or do we need regulatory intervention? This session is sponsored by CNET / CBS Interactive.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Longhorn, Omni Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

  • On the Internet, Everyone Knows You're a Dog

    by Michael Sippey, Rick Webb, Jessica Zollman, Heather Champ and Ted Rheingold

    As former Representative Anthony Weiner discovered the hard way, remaining anonymous in this hyper-social world is becoming nearlyimpossible. But what sucks for Anthony Wiener has been great for conversations on the Web – with the rise of authenticated platforms, anonymous comments and posts are giving way to real dialogs between authors and their audiences.
    For example, when comments on popular sites like TechCrunch became tied to real Facebook profiles, the experience went from a juvenile insult-fest to a civil value-add information exchange. There’s undoubtedly progress to be made, but authentication and social platforms are giving us a glimpse of what the future holds: low friction ways to connect your opinion to a piece of content, easier ways to see what your friends care about, and better ways to insert your POV.
    For better or worse, it’s becoming harder to remain anonymous online. In this panel discussion, we will discuss how technology is changing online self-expression.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Personal Identity Management: Why It Matters

    by Fatemeh Khatibloo

    The marketing ecosystem as it stands is unsustainable. Consumers don’t trust marketers to respect their privacy, and unfortunately, marketers have done a poor job explaining how data is collected, managed and applied to improve the customer experience.

    Meanwhile, as consumers leave behind an exponentially growing digital footprint, they’re also becoming increasingly aware that marketers use and sell this data for financial gain. As a result, a nascent industry is developing around consumers’ desire for transparency, portability, privacy and tangible benefits.

    In this session, we’ll share results of research aimed at understanding consumers’ motivators, concerns, and awareness of this ecosystem. We’ll make sense of terms like “VRM,” “data locker,” “personal cloud” and “trust framework,” and provide an overview of the Identity Ecosystem, including the operating models, the frontrunners in each, and how interactive marketers can get ahead of the curve.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Assembly Room, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

  • Security and Privacy in Social Networks

    by Eva Galperin and John Adams

    This panel will explore the interplay between user privacy, social networking sites, law enforcement, and the teams of people that are tasked with both enforcing and protecting the users of these sites. We'll discuss best practices for protecting your company and your users and if you are a frequent user of social networking sites, you can learn how minimize the information that can be exposed about you in your travels online. We'll show you how we fight for the users, every day.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Lone Star, Omni Downtown

Monday 12th March 2012

  • How Not to Die: Using Tech in a Dictatorship

    by Mark Belinsky, Brian Conley, Sabrina Hersi Issa and Deanna Zandt

    A discussion about how technologies that are often built in the west are being used around the world in extremely dangerous situations. Often there isn't an idea of how to protect individuals and their human rights when developing these tools, even when they're being used by activists and changemakers around the world. This panel will present concrete examples from Burma, Tibet, Liberia and Egypt.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 12th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Principles and Practices for Privacy by Design

    by Keith Enright, Michelle Bruno, Ilana Westerman and Natalie Fonseca

    Smart policies and practices for managing data and protecting your users’ personal information are good for business. It doesn't have to be a zero-sum game where you sacrifice privacy for usability, functionality or security. Whether you're part of a small team or a large organization, find out how to earn users' trust by applying Privacy by Design to your product development and business practices.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Ballroom BC, Austin Convention Center

  • Recognize This! Ethics of Mobile Face Tagging

    by Bryan Nunez and Harlo Holmes

    With the ready availability of social media, digital databases of ID photos, high-resolution cameras and free, powerful face recognition software that can run on smartphones, we are entering into an unprecedented shift in the visual privacy of everyday people. Technology that was once the domain of authoritarian states, is now being put to use by the hottest tech startups, who often lack the capacity or capability to consider the broader cultural impact.

    What right do people have to control personal images in a socially-networked age or to be visually anonymous in a video-mediated world? Startups like Viewdle are building compelling user experiences that correlate people who appear in photos taken with your smartphone, with all of the profile photos stored in your address book and social graphic. The question is, how is it decided who can be recognized and indexed, how and when, and where does control of that record reside?

    The ObscuraCam project (developed by WITNESS and the Guardian Project, funded by Google) will be shared as one countermeasure to these trends. It is a mobile app that allows users to automatically conceal faces or objects in photos and video, using pixelization, masks or redaction. It also removes extra metadata, such as GPS location, often stored in media.

    Bryan Nunez will represent WITNESS, presenting human rights advocacy driven user stories and challenges. Harlo Holmes will counter with "privacy by design" technology solutions.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

  • HOW: Why HOW We Do Anything Means Everything

    by Dov Seidman

    In today's interconnected and even morally interdependent world, we rise and fall together. The way to forge a better, more sustainable path of growth and progress lies in the realm of human behavior- HOW we do what we do. Leaders have become successful at measuring how much by out-selling and out-spending. But instead of asking how much, we should be examining HOW. How we behave, lead, consume, build trust in our relationships, and relate to others has always mattered but in an age when everything can be tweeted and blogged about and where there is no such thing as private behavior, HOW matters more than ever and in ways it never has before. Through entertaining anecdotes and illuminating examples, Dov Seidman will discuss why, in light of the recent financial and environmental crises of epic proportions, how is no longer just a question: HOW is the answer.

    At 11:30am to 11:50am, Monday 12th March

    In Ballroom G, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Sharing Privately in the Context of Health

    by Michael Nichols

    Social sharing about all topics is now commonplace, and the trend of increasingly open sharing about historically “private” aspects of our lives reflect changing standards about what’s appropriately public information. At the same time, for certain subjects – including health – privacy and confidentiality concerns often keep us from open sharing.

    At the same time, we now know that sharing health information, particularly in an online social context, can have significant benefits (for all who share and others), especially when practiced in large groups/communities.

    This session will explore how to create environments where participants receive the benefits of sharing, while also enjoying the peace of mind of privacy: secure sharing. It will address emerging trends in technology (including mobile sharing and privacy/security technology), products (including online and mobile services that allow anonymous sharing of health information), privacy controls and sharing trends, and current (as of the time of the talk) law, which collectively support the new and exciting prospect of "secure sharing" and the related benefits it creates.

    At 11:30am to 11:45am, Monday 12th March

    In Texas Ballroom 4-7, Hyatt Regency Austin

  • Data Breaches: Taking the Bull by the Horns

    by Michael Bruemmer, Joseph DeMarco, Joe Ross, Terry Hemeyer and Monika Jedrzejowska

    Over the past year, 90% of businesses have been hit by at least one IT security breach. What does this mean? Businesses should consider breaches a statistical certainty and be prepared. Breaches are not the only thing to worry about–most security incidents are not cyber-attacks, but process or other non-hacker issues, like employee activities outside the firm. And it’s not just an IT problem. The manner in how breaches occur, how companies respond and ensuing media coverage can destroy a brand, impacting the whole business. Today, leaders must know about technologies that enable companies to quickly respond and protect customers, plus communication techniques to ensure their brand weathers the storm. In this panel, you’ll hear from experts regarding crisis communications, legal issues and consumer concerns in the event of a breach. Learn how to be ready with a smart plan that includes proactive protection, company preparedness, customer communications and media outreach.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Capital Ballroom B, InterContinental Stephen F. Austin

    Coverage audio clip

  • Location Tracking: Threatening or Value-added?

    by Siobhan Quinn, Joe Brown, Cameron Clayton, Louis Gump and Christopher Peralta

    The ability of consumer electronics to sense location has no doubt opened the doors to a new dimension of mobile services that include navigation, local search, contextual social connectivity, and mobile advertising/marketing. And consumers have clearly iterated a preference to have these services delivered through their mobile devices, as evidenced by sharp declines in personal navigation device businesses over the past two years. But the vast opportunities of this new dimension come with an equally vast array of technological, safety, privacy and marketing issues, among others, that must be evaluated and addressed. In this session, leaders from different groups invested in the future of location technologies - from the device side to content developers to mobile marketers - will discuss the importance of location capabilities in mobile devices for evolving the consumer’s relationship to and affinity for their brands. Panelists will illustrate examples of value-added consumer use cases and discuss how marketers and application developers must prioritize the development of contextually relevant, sticky services to drive mobile advertising growth.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Sex, Lies and Cookies: Web Privacy EXPOSED!

    by Lorrie Cranor, Berin Szoka, Lydia Parnes, Andy Kahl and Christopher Soghoian

    During "Sex, Lies, and Cookies: Web Privacy EXPOSED!", panelists look into the world of data collection and privacy on the internet, asking tough questions about what “tracking” really entails. The discussion focuses on how data collection is integrated into the current structure of the web, and what (if anything) people can do to make informed choices about how they allow their information to be used. Moderated by Andy Kahl, Ghostery’s product manager, the panel includes Lydia Parnes (former director, Bureau of Consumer Protection at FTC), Christopher Soghoian (graduate fellow at Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research), Lorrie Cranor (associate professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon), and Berin Szoka (founder, TechFreedom).

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon B, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Can Washington Make Your App Illegal?

    by Ahmed Siddiqui, Mike Sax and Jonathan Godfrey

    So you've worked for months writing code, assembling creative, and testing out your app until it it's finally ready for mass consumption. The App Store has approved it and you are getting solid reviews. But how are you storing your users' registration information? Have you taken adequate steps to ensure its authenticity? Do you know how old your users are or what information is being passed on to advertisers? A wrong answer to these questions could land you in hot water with the authorities. And Congress is considering regulations to strictly monitor the relationships you have with your customers. Our panel discusses avoiding privacy pitfalls. Experts will share their experiences negotiating with Congress and explain how to modify your app to avoid enforcement action by regulators.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon K, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Sex, Dating and Privacy Online Post-Weinergate

    by Samhita Mukhopadhyay, Violet Blue, Rachel Kramer Bussel and Twanna Hines

    We’re living in an age when even powerful politicians can’t keep track of their digital dating trail. Employers and exes are likely reading your words. How can you write about sex, participate in online dating and social networking sites, and still maintain your privacy? Bloggers and authors Violet Blue (sex author, tech columnist; @violet blue and tinynibbles.com), Rachel Kramer Bussel (Lusty Lady, Best Sex Writing series editor), Twanna A. Hines (Funky Brown Chick®, The Late Sex Show with Twanna Hines), and Samhita Mukhopadhyay (author, Outdated: Why Dating is Ruining Your Love Life, Executive Editor, Feministing.com).

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Longhorn, Omni Downtown

    Coverage audio clip

Tuesday 13th March 2012

  • How the Wallet Was Won: The End of Paper Receipts

    by Scott Brady, David Barrett, Colleen Taylor and Jae Kim

    Our wallets are one of the last remaining bastions of a pre-digital lifestyle, relics of an era of payment that has since come and gone.

    Coupons are now Groupons, rewards cards are digitally stored on our smartphones and Square wants to power all our payments. With all these new ways to slim down and streamline our wallets, why are we still getting a paper receipt every time we check out at the grocery store? With so much progress, why are men still sporting the infamous Costanza bulge and women toting around pocketbooks that look like small filing cabinets? As more commerce shifts from offline to online, and even offline retailers are experimenting with digital marketing & transactions, the Costanza wallet is due for a makeover.

    What are the brands and startups that are changing how we think about receipts? What will the implications of Big Data and privacy be in this transition? And what systems will ultimately come to define how we all chronicle our shopping experiences moving forward?

    Our wallets have been ceding themselves over to the digital age for quite some time now. It’s about time we took that final leap and made the upgrade to Wallet 2.0.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Rio Grande, Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown

  • Social Media Boundaries: Personal/Personnel Policy

    by Vanessa Rhinesmith, Debra Askanase, Jess Main and Amy Sample Ward

    As our networks expand, our profiles get more public, and our work requires a human face, where do we draw the line between personal and professional identities online? How do we maintain those boundaries for our community members? How do we respond to attacks, opportunities, and over-shares online? When does over-sharing hurt the community? When should you share your own personal stories as a manager, or personally reach out to community members?

    Growing and cultivating an active community also requires that the community manager walk the fine line of personal and professional sharing. Every community manager wonders when and how to professionally cultivate leaders and members to create a thriving community while still being personal. On the reverse side, sometimes community members share too much, which can hurt the health of the community.

    This panel will address these questions and more from experience in nonprofit and public media sectors.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

  • Social Shopping: The Zeros & Ones Changing Fashion

    by Caroline Waxler

    With the developments in social shopping such as real time social shopping sites, Facebook shopping, and location-based check-ins, recommendations, and deals, the fashion industry is catering to the customer like never before. But how social can—and should—shopping get? While consumers may want to consume together, over-sharing of information is all too easy. Apple’s Ping, Facebook’s Beacon and Blippy are but three familiar examples.This core conversation will discuss how privacy fits in and explores the question of just who is safe guarding the community.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Driskill Ballroom, Driskill Hotel

  • Mobile Privacy: Developer Kits & Tips

    by Chris Conley, Nick Doty, Tim Vetter, Kevin Mahaffey and Tara Whalen

    There are tools and tutorials out there to teach developers all sorts of things about mobile apps, taking them from "Hello World!" to sophisticated products ready for the big time. But if you want help building privacy into your app, that's a lot harder to find.

    This workshop seeks to change that. Through demos of existing resources and Q&A with attendees, we will provide you with the tools and skills you need to build the next killer mobile app while protecting your users' privacy and avoiding the media firestorms and government investigations that can kill a fledgling product.

    We'll include hands-on demos of existing apps and developer kits and tools that help you think through and address the privacy implications of the data you collect and use. We'll also discuss what other resources are needed to give designers and developers the ability to meet their deadlines, pull in revenue, and still stand up for their users' privacy.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Automobile As Network Node

    by Beth Hill, Gerard M Stegmaier, Michelle Avary and Nick Pudar

    This is a Continuing Legal Education panel: Automobiles are increasingly connected to computer networks and are used to collect, use and share vehicle-related information. They also provide a delivery mechanism for driving, entertainment and other content and information. This panel will discuss legal issues arising out of and related to the collection, use and disclosure of vehicle-related information and related emerging legal issues of data use in or related to vehicles.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center