•  

Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 with notes on Monday 12th March

View as grid

Your current filters are…

Clear
  • Create More Value Than You Capture

    by Tim O'Reilly and Andrew Mcafee

    One of the great failures of any company - for that matter of a capitalist economy - is ecosystem failure. Great companies build great ecosystems, one in which value is created not just for a single company or group of industry players, but for partners who didn't even exist when the product or service was introduced. Many companies start out creating huge value. Consider Microsoft, whose vision of a computer on every desk and in every home changed the world of computing forever, and created a rich ecosystem for developers. But as Microsoft's growth stalled, they gradually consumed more and more of the opportunity for themselves, and innovators moved elsewhere, to the Internet. Internet innovators like Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Twitter have also created a rich ecosystem of opportunity, but like Microsoft before them, they are leaving less and less on the table for others. This is a bad trend. Wall Street firms, which got their start trading on behalf of clients, then began trading against them, then created vast Ponzi economies to drain the value from entire segments of the economy are even more dire examples of this trend. But this crisis of capitalism goes beyond individual industry segments. For example, the race by companies to eliminate labor costs has been a short term profit win but a long term loss. Since the cycle of capitalism depends on consumers as well as producers, and consumers are less and less able to find employment, at some point, we're going to have to start thinking about how to put people to work, rather than how to put them out of work. At O'Reilly, we've always tried to live by the slogan "Create more value than you capture." It's a great way to build a sustainable business and a sustainable economy.
    Andrew McAfee, author of "Race Against the Machine," will engage with Tim about these ideas, and about how rethinking the economy becomes even more urgent in the face of the trend he explores in his book, in which jobs are being outsourced not just to low-wage countries, but increasingly to machines.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

  • The Page Is Dead

    by Jacob Surber

    Responsive web design is changing the definition of a "page," as it aims to address the growing variety of device form factors and locations where content is consumed. Additionally, as the web evolves, rules and limitations must be better understood in order to create truly unique content. This session will focus on design philosophy and development techniques to create and adapt your content for maximum impact, regardless of where and how it is consumed. Topics will include: • Proper elements for the proper content • Design for context • Adapt your UI and adapt your content • Design with ratios vs. design with pixels • Know the limitations • Designing with limitations • Let the limitations set you free.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Town Lake Ballroom, Radisson Hotel & Suites Austin-Town Lake

  • Community & Influence: How Not to Piss People Off

    by Evan Hamilton, Maria Ogneva, Frank Eliason and Megan Berry

    Marketing is social. We're all sold. But how do you maximize your return in social without appearing like a douchebag? One the one hand, top influencers in the social space are the ones who can truly drive action back to your brand. Yet, on the other hand no one likes a brand who refuses to interact with the little guy. As social marketing becomes more serious, more serious metrics are being demanded -- learn what works and what doesn't. And what about service -- should influence affect whom you help first?

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Capital Ballroom B, St David's Bethell Hall