Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 matching your filters

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  • Free Coffee, Bad Apples & the Future of Currency

    by Jonathan Stark

    What would happen if the entire world could share a single Starbucks card? For a week in the summer of 2011, Jonathan's Card attracted international attention attempting to find out. Join Jonathan for a behind the scenes look at how it worked, what actually happened, and the long term implications of an experiment in radical sharing of physical goods using digital currency on mobile phones.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Language of Mutilation: Grammar for Ads & Life

    by Gail Marie

    Grammar is like K-Y Jelly — when used correctly, everyone benefits. But copywriters and art directors find equal pleasure wreaking grammatical havoc, the results of which Strunk and White deemed “the mutilation of language” back in 1918. They’d likely cringe at Honda Civic’s tagline “To Each Their Own.” (Do you know why?) And sometimes there are good reasons to disregard the evolving commandments of English language construction, like how pronouns must agree with their antecedents, especially when following the “rules” will turn off your reader. But even in 2012, some things should be right every time. Who the hell are Strunk and White? And what are these things we should get right? Come find out. We’ll talk about where these “rules” came from, the assumptions made about those who appear not to follow them and a few grammar basics. Punctuation isn’t so boring if you think about quotation marks as little hugs, ravishing commas and periods. It’s almost hot, in a syntactic kind of way.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Europe Is Different, so Adapt Your Strategy!

    by Bastian Scherbeck

    Nowadays, everyone seems to be focused on China as the worlds 'next' market. However, the European Union has a larger combined economy than the US, with the largest markets within it being Germany, France, the UK and Italy. With European social media use dominated by Facebook, you might assume that the an identical platform allows for easy application of US-focused social media marketing approaches to the countries of the EU.

    It couldn't be further from the truth - From tonality, to the willingness to share, to the topics of data security and privacy: In terms of being social online, Europe is different from the US. And Europe is different from Europe. Therefore: adapt your measures! If you want to successfully market your brand and products on a pan-European level – this is the session you need to attend!

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Have Latin American Media Become Social?

    by Valdir Ugalde

    The digital era has taken media in Latin America by surprise. While some media groups jumped in right away, others are still trying to decide how to (or if they should) join the digital and Social Media sphere. At the same time, new social media are approaching the Web audience by delivering relevant, timely and sometimes ad-free content. For example, YouTube recently broadcast the entire Copa America (a very popular regional soccer tournament) using a dedicated channel on its website, thus challenging the TV monopolies in several countries of the region.
    This session will focus on presenting the various approaches to Web 2.0 in media across Latin America. Attendees will gain a better perspective on demographic, political and cultural differences within the region, and the correlation with the main media groups accross the various countries. The session will include success stories to provide a more thorough picture.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Room 5ABC, Austin Convention Center

  • What the London Riots Taught Us About Social Media

    by Kevin Hartman

    In 1985 London boiled in a summer of unrest known as the Boardwater Farm Riots. Some 26 years later, last summer's London Riots began under much the same circumstances yet grew to be dramatically more destructive. The primary difference between the two events: the present-day existence of social media. As a result the London Riots of 2011 were meticulously documented in millions of Tweets, BBM messages, Internet news mentions, and Facebook posts. The electronic record tells a fascinating tale of social media’s role in the chaos, from its provision of “utilities” for riot planners and onlookers to its ability to steer the event’s emotional tone. Framed in the context of the Arab Spring uprising that came before and the Occupy Movement that would follow, this presentation offers a unique view into one of the most devastating illustrations of social media's power the world has known and the role it plays for revolutionaries, rioters, and rebels alike.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Longhorn, Omni Downtown