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Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 matching your filters

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  • China: Creators and Consumers of the Future

    by Brandon Berry Edwards and Kaj Vatsa

    China is considered home to the world's factories, manufacturing everything from zippers to photovoltaic cells and with its population of over 1.3 billion and booming economy, consumerism is on the rise, too. But lets peak into the hidden layer of China's unique blend of creativity and tech innovation. There's the Shanzhai phenomenon - unique to China but even more interesting is looking at how Chinese consumers use technology differently, creating and combining platforms to suit the demands of a generation bred on instant gratification and constant connectivity.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Gaming Tools Kids Want to Use

    by Virginia Mcarthur, Alexander Repenning, Tamara Hudgins, Ward Tisdale and David Gerding

    Limited choices exist when kids seek to author, not just play, their own video games. If video games are on track to topple film as the last big media mammoth, how can we build a video game workforce that we need? Instead of reinforcing the divide between artists and programmers, can we get more kids interested in learning the complex work that game development involves, and foster a really great game development community? What kids like to use for game development may surprise you. Come hear what they like, why the like it, and how new tools need to be built to meet the demands of future game developers. Join a conversation about authorship, identity, creativity, and the tools kids really use for developing serious and social games. Gain insight on elements of game tools that kids would use--if they existed!

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Tuesday 13th March

    In Classroom 203, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Government As a Catalyst: Prizes 4 Tech Innovation

    by James Pol, Mari Kuraishi, Jenn Gustetic, Michael O'Neill and Chris Gerty

    Want to make some money? Federal agencies have recently been given the authority by Congress to sponsor competitions for individuals, groups, and companies to develop new ideas and technology innovations for a chance to win potentially lucrative prizes. These competitions can range from new mobile outreach technologies to web-based data analytics tools to even vehicle-to-vehicle communications; the government is looking for breakthrough technologies from the minds of the most innovative and forward thinking Americans, many of whom are at SXSW. This session will highlight some of the coolest prizes for technology development that the government has been involved in to date, including the DOT’s Connected Vehicle Challenge, the VA’s Open Source and blue button projects, and NASA’s centennial challenges. Additionally you will learn about some prizes government did NOT play a role in to explore what role the government should be playing in these activities moving forward.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon B, AT&T Conference Center

  • How Simulations Can Change the Future of Learning

    by Bjorn Billhardt

    Humans learn by doing. We master how to ride a bike not by watching a PowerPoint presentation but by trying it out and falling down. Yet, in school, most of our time is spent listening and memorizing facts. But the world is changing. As computer games become more social and computers become more prevalent in the classroom, the opportunity for true interactive multi-player learning through games and simulations is finally becoming tangible.

    This interactive presentation will focus on how simulations can change the way we learn. Using examples from corporate training and the K-12 space, it will explore how simulations can teach children and adults in ways that increase engagement and retention of knowledge.

    The presentation will include examples of both successful and unsuccessful simulations and chart a path of how simulations can revolutionize education by allowing learners – both young and old – to internalize knowledge through the process of learn-by-doing.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Classroom 203, AT&T Conference Center

  • Language Technology and the Clinical Narrative

    by Philip Resnik

    Electronic health records have the potential for enormous good, but in order for them to live up to their full potential, information about patients -- their symptoms, diagnoses, allergic reactions, medical backgrounds, family histories -- must take the form of standardized, structured, easy-to-manipulate data. One obvious way to get there is to tightly structure the way that doctors create the medical record. As a result, physicians are under increasing pressure to abandon unrestricted natural language and the clinical narrative, and turn the medical documentation process into a jungle of pull-down menus, checkboxes, and restricted vocabularies. In this presentation I argue that the results could be catastrophic, I make the case for preserving the clinical narrative, and I argue for a practical way out of the dilemma: using natural language processing technology to produce the structured records we need, while still allowing physicians the freedom of unrestricted clinical language.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Classroom 204, AT&T Conference Center

  • China: Will It Redefine Our Digital Landscape?

    by Freddie Laker

    Not only is China on course to having the #1 economy in the world, but it's also establishing itself as the most influential country in the world. Its 500 million strong internet user population makes up the single largest internet-using community in the world with almost 100 million more new users added each year. China, in many people's eyes, is regarded as an industrial nation with vast production capabilities that imitates but does not innovate. This panel will explore how China's digital landscape will change the lives of its population, and consequently, it's effect on our society and the rest of the world.Topics will include China's social networks, mobile platforms, music services, piracy, pop/meme culture, BBS society and changes in society due to digitalization.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Policy Effects of Media Portrayals of Hacktivists

    by Molly Sauter

    Hollywood and the international news media delight in presenting us with depictions of hackers and hacktivists as subterranean Ohmian "Super Users," capable of hacking *all* the ISPs with a few keystrokes in between shots of Red Bull. How do these depictions, both in fiction and news coverage of hacktivist actions, affect the development and implementation of Internet policy and regulations? In this talk, I'll be examining how media coverage and depictions of hackers and hacktivists has changed as the hacktivist movement has developed since the 1980s. I'll be describing how such coverage, from "Sneakers" to photo galleries of Fawkes-masked Anonymous protests, influences policy on subjects from intellectual property and communications regulations to information security and cyberwar. I'll be questioning what these trends of laws, regulations, and apparent media biases mean for the future of hacktivism and digital activism.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center