Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 with write-up on Saturday 10th March

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  • Designing Experiences for Women

    by Jessica Ivins and Brad Nunnally

    Women have become the digital mainstream. In the US market, women make up just under half of the online population, but they spend 58 percent of e-commerce dollars. Women are online gamers, shoppers, bloggers, and social media consumers. And yet, we still don’t know how to design for them.

    The immediate impulse when designing for women is to “shrink it and pink it,” meaning products are splashed with the color pink, and content and messaging are dumbed down. But women want what’s relevant to them. They want products and online experiences that are intuitive, not insulting to their intelligence. They want function, not frills.

    This session reviews the historical and contemporary landscape of designing for women. We’ll review misguided, yet well-intentioned designs based on assumptions and stereotypes that have flopped. Likewise, we’ll review success stories of well-designed products and experiences that truly meet women’s needs. We’ll also look at when gender should factor into your design and when it shouldn’t. Ultimately, when designing for women (or men, or both), you’ll want to get it right.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom BC, Austin Convention Center

  • Best Practices: Native + Web Hybrid Mobile Apps

    by Charles Ying

    Learn different ways to integrate HTML5 into native apps, what tools you can use, and when to build your own. We'll cover achieving high graphics frame rates, touch responsiveness while conserving battery life. Learn the benefits and tradeoffs of mobile graphics hardware acceleration in animation and emulating native UI in mobile web browsers. We'll also touch on Flipboard's use of HTML5.We'll cover these specific technology areas: WebKit and JavaScriptCore; native view system architecture, animated scene graphs; and hardware accelerated graphics drawing and compositing.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Salon H, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • Startup Passion Smack-Down

    by John Bradberry

    A surprisingly high percentage of entrepreneurs derail their startups because they fall in love with their idea. Emotional attachment to an idea leads to premature scaling and a number of other dangers. But, passion is a sacred topic among founders, who are often just as passionate about their passion as about their startups. Too often, we entrepreneurs equate rigorous scrutiny of our ideas with “negative thinking.” In this workshop we will transcend the false dichotomy between "positive" and "negative" thinking, and explore how entrepreneurial passion can bring danger along with its obvious benefits. Drawing on the latest psychological and business research, we will show how to scrutinize and strengthen your startup idea in a way that deepens your passion and confidence, and elevates your odds of success.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Salon A, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • The Building Blocks for Indoor Navigation

    by Ants Maran, Josh Marti, Ankit Agarwal, Nick Such and Chris Broadfoot

    The prevalence of location-based services has been rising over the past few years, but they have yet to venture into the place where people spend 80% of their lives: inside buildings. Startups and large corporations alike are racing to build the infrastructure to make indoor LBS possible. Hear from a few of the players in indoor mapping and indoor positioning technologies as they discuss the future of indoor navigation.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Salon J, Hilton Austin Downtown

  • CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    by Andy Hume

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It's difficult to document patterns, and it's difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

  • The Curators and the Curated

    by Noah Brier, Maria Popova, Mia Quagliarello, Max Linsky and David Carr

    At the heart of our conversation: the relationship between publishers of original content and the web’s most influential curators. Seems simple, right? Content creators get eyeballs and curators get work to share. But with some curators dwarfing publications in size and influence, and with some publishers investing heavily in curation projects of their own, that relationship is getting a little complicated. We’ll get our hands dirty and break down just how important curators and publishers are to each other, how money plays into things and how attribution has become a lost art. Other fun stuff you’ll learn: what makes a curator influential, how content-creators can be curator friendly (and vice versa), and the evolving distinction between curation and aggregation. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol