Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 matching your filters

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  • Crowdsourcing Government: Why Access Matters

    by Tim Kelsey, Caroline Mauldin and Rakesh Rajani

    A public right to data is key to unlocking the biggest enterprise opportunity of our time: integrating social media with public services. Open government combines transparency with citizen participation. This is the future of government. The Open Government Partnership is a new international initiative - bringing together more than 50 countries and international civil society - to share best practice in beating corruption, improving social justice and driving growth and innovation. The UK has put Transparency at the heart of its vision of social and economic growth and is one of the founder members of the OGP. This session also hears from other key founders of the OGP from around the world – including Samantha Power, special assistant to President Barack Obama and the architect of the initiative and Rakesh Rajani, a global civil society leader. The Future is Open: find out how to become an Open Government pioneer.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon C, AT&T Conference Center

  • Public Lab: Mapping, DIY Activism & Civic Science

    by Jennifer Hudon, Mathew Lippincott, Gregory Foster and Shannon Dosemagen

    Are you embroiled in an cartographic dispute? Do you disagree with the official version of your geography? Do you need a up-to-date map of your area of interest?From the BP Oil Spill to the Gowanus Canal Super Fund site, Grassroots Mapping and the Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science work to empower citizens around the world. Communities engage in citizen cartography and create aerial images with low-cost, DIY, open sourced technologies. This method of mapping creates on-demand imagery that’s 30 to 50 times higher resolution than what’s available via Google Maps. It allows people to document, to lobby and to enact change in their neighborhoods. The Public Laboratory community has expanded to organize projects around the world. Recently recognized with the award of $500,000 Knight Foundation grant, that work continues to expand. We’ll discuss the unique challenges and obstacles of scaling citizen science, IRL community development work, and online technology engagement.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Digital Health: Borrow from Developing Countries?

    by Andre Blackman and Jaspal Sandhu

    Can novel health applications in developing countries spark health innovation in the United States? Massive experimentation in mobile and interactive health is taking place overseas, often targeting poor populations in poor countries. Consider several current examples: 1) a smart card enabled health savings scheme for uninsured mothers-to-be; 2) a crowdsourcing application to identify medicine stockouts in real-time; and 3) a viral model for peer sharing audio health content using mobile phones and traditional social networks. These are services from just one country: Kenya. Worldwide, mobile and interactive innovations represent fundamental shifts in how we think about health and healthcare. These innovations are leapfrogging traditional models. What can we adapt to the US health system (and market) in the next 2-3 years?

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center