Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 matching your filters

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  • Storytelling Beyond Words: New Forms of Journalism

    by Stephen Buckley, Jim Brady, Bill Adair and Aron Pilhofer

    We are in the midst of a digital revolution, and yet journalistic storytelling remains trapped in the Stone Age. We have all sorts of digital tools at our disposal -- video, social media, interactive graphics, etc. -- and still our stories are boring. Our panel will help you think in new ways about storytelling forms. Instead of sending users to a separate link for a video, why not embed video into the story at strategic points? Instead of writing long articles analyzing the accuracy of a politician's statements, why not invent a meter that allows the audience to quickly see that for themselves? We'll offer examples of how journalists harness digital tools to reinvent storytelling in ways that delight audiences, elucidate complex issues, improve communities and strengthen democracy. This panel is for geeks who care about storytelling; it's for storytellers who care about digital tools; and it's for anyone who cares about the future of journalism.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • How Comics Journalism Is Saving Your Media

    by Ronald Wimberly, Susie Cagle, Matt Bors, Sarah Jaffe and Erin Polgreen

    While traditional journalism struggles to find its footing, comics journalism is inherently stylish, uniquely suited to sharing via social media, and popular as hell. During this panel, we'll share findings gleaned from editors, journalists and artists who have stretched the limits of comics to tell complicated stories in a variety of formats, from traditional paneled storytelling to interactive web pieces. We’ll also discuss how this creative nonfiction can impact public policy and reach a broader audience.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Open Web, Open News: Reporters & Developers Remix

    by Dan Sinker, Emily Bell, Mohamed Nanabhay and Andrew Leimdorfer

    We're experiencing the birth of a new era: Legacy news organizations are beginning the process of moving beyond their print and broadcast past, while new, all-web reporting outfits begin to chart a path into a new future. In the process, exciting new discussions of how the culture of the open web intersects with the culture of the newsroom are growing ever more frequent. All of this has kicked off a wave of innovation throughout the journalism space that has seen leaps forward in real-time reporting, data visualization, back-end technology, and much more. But it's nothing compared to the innovations to come.

    Recognizing the many opportunities to facilitate community and empower webmakers to build real tools, the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership was formed in 2011. It has kicked off a year of design challenges that culminated in placing technology fellows in some of the world's best newsrooms, charged with creating code for new kinds of news.

    As the partnership enters its second year, this conversation will address the broad implications of this new kind of collaboration: How do we work together to innovate in the news space? How do we bring the best practices of both disciplines to bear on the other? How do we broaden the scope, spread the code, and create real impact?

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Sports Media: The Beat Goes Gone?

    by Jonathan Abrams, Tom James, Johnny Ludden, Kathleen Hessert and Kevin Arnovitz

    Until quite recently, there was a single source of record for your favorite sports team: The beat writer. For decades, the local paper determined what sports fans would consume and how they’d consume it.Not until the explosion of the internet were sports fans able to fulfill their desire to know more about their team -- and know that stuff immediately. The web completely innovated the experience of being a sports fan. Pretty soon, athletes were communicating directly with fans. Highlight dunks were published online seconds later. Reporters began to tweet notes from practice instantly.Today's modern sports fan demands immediacy, and this appetite is driving a new kind of sports coverage, one that relies on innovation, both technically and editorially. Our panel will explore the rapid innovation that has occurred in sports journalism, and promises to continue at an exponential rate. We'll seek to answer the question: What will the sports beat look like in 10 years?

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Driskill Ballroom, Driskill Hotel

  • Still Invisible? Waging Stories with Social Media

    by Jackie Mahendra, Heather Cronk, Jehmu Greene, Felipe Matos and Joe Sudbay

    What does it mean to wage a story? In this panel, Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas describes the moment of coming out as an undocumented immigrant, an "outlaw" in his own country. He explores the ways in which his radically visible story traveled from the New York Times to Facebook to Youtube and back -- and forced a toxic national debate into a human frame. As context for Jose's incredible story, Joe Sudbay, Deputy Editor of AMERICABlog, describes how bold, hi-tech storytelling transformed the political calculus during the waning months of the last Congress and landed him in a meeting with President Obama at the White House. Felipe Matos takes us on a journey that reinvents what it means to push for civil rights: a 1,500 mile walk from Miami to DC, tweeted at every turn.These hypervisible, once-invisible stories are changing what we thought we knew about the communities that are "coming out," as well as how to tap the power of social media to ignite change.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Longhorn, Omni Downtown

  • Content and Coding Are Not Commodities

    by Andrei Scheinkman, Benjamin Balter, Raju Narisetti and Jennifer 8. Lee

    Geeks see code as art and content as stuff. Journalists see code as stuff and content as the art. Geeks may say "provide me content" while journalists are like "build this site." With that kind of attitudes, it's hard to get buy-in from the other side. What coders and journalists should understand: they have more in common than not. Both sides are motivated by their craft and a desire to feel that an audience is experiencing their work, whether though prose or programming. They want to work with smart people on interesting problems. Coders and writers are not interchangeable. Great talent can be an order of magnitude more effective than mediocre talent.Though discussions of case studies from The Washington Post, New York Times, Huffington Post and the federal government, this panel will explain from both the journalists' and the programmers' perspectives how to speak a language they will understand.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol