Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 matching your filters

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  • Publishing Models Transforming the Book

    by Molly Barton, Brian Altounian, Swanna MacNair, Jefferson Rabb and Rachel Deahl

    By the end of 2011 it is projected that E-books will account for a quarter of frontlist book sales. Bricks and mortar stores are fighting for a fraction of the retail business. Publishers are being more selective about—and paying less money for—the books they acquire. In short, the publishing industry is changing dramatically. With change comes opportunity and everyone from legacy publishing houses to entrepreneurial individuals are creating new business models that locate talent and package content in new ways. Is the book dead? No—it’s being re-imagined and redefined by these very people.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Storytelling Beyond Words: New Forms of Journalism

    by Stephen Buckley, Jim Brady, Bill Adair and Aron Pilhofer

    We are in the midst of a digital revolution, and yet journalistic storytelling remains trapped in the Stone Age. We have all sorts of digital tools at our disposal -- video, social media, interactive graphics, etc. -- and still our stories are boring. Our panel will help you think in new ways about storytelling forms. Instead of sending users to a separate link for a video, why not embed video into the story at strategic points? Instead of writing long articles analyzing the accuracy of a politician's statements, why not invent a meter that allows the audience to quickly see that for themselves? We'll offer examples of how journalists harness digital tools to reinvent storytelling in ways that delight audiences, elucidate complex issues, improve communities and strengthen democracy. This panel is for geeks who care about storytelling; it's for storytellers who care about digital tools; and it's for anyone who cares about the future of journalism.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Discoverability and the New World of Book PR

    by Calvin Reid, Barbara Cave Henricks, Rusty Shelton and Hollis Heimbouch

    Shelf space isn't what it used to be. A search on "leadership books" on Amazon returns more than 60,000 results. The same search on Google returns more than 130 million results. With retail bookstores increasingly giving way to digital devices, success in publishing is no longer about distribution, it's about discoverability.

    This session will detail the many changes that are taking place in the publishing industry and will explore how authors and publishers can set themselves up to succeed in this new environment. We will focus on teaching you how to leverage your platform and how to build meaningful relationships with media members ahead of a book launch.

    Increasingly journalists are taking a 'don't call us, we'll call you' approach to publicity, looking to connect directly with authors, experts, sources and great ideas via social media. So, how can you widen your net online to snag these media queries and, most importantly, impact discoverability? You'll learn how in this session.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Driving the Change: Public Media Goes Transmedia

    by Sue Schardt, Ellen Horne and Kara Oehler

    Public media—especially radio—has emerged as a seedbed for inventive producers driving a new culture of experimentation across traditional and digital platforms. Its unique legacy blends technical ingenuity, a vision aimed at serving the "greater good" of society, and a hybrid business model that combines government and foundation funding with support from users. We'll bring together producers at the vanguard of reinvention to consider how they are crossing both platform and industry boundaries to create pathbreaking transmedia documentaries, participatory installations, and storytelling tools.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Once & Future King: Can Syndication Save Content?

    by Todd Martin, Christel van der Boom, Jesse Levine and John Pettitt

    The publishing industry has always embraced new technology as a primary driver of success. Syndication was once the solution for an industry challenged by economics, technology, and globalism, allowing content to reach the widest audience at the greatest cost savings. But it hasn’t changed much in the last century. As new practices of media consumption emerge, publishers have seen their fortunes decline precipitously. While content may still be king, the distribution and consumption of that content have become increasingly problematic. Caught between outmoded business models and the disruptive dynamics of digital media, publishers now occupy an untenable position that impacts their ability to remain competitive and profitable. Can syndication once again save publishing by providing new modes of distribution, consumption, and revenue? This panel will discuss current syndication practices and explore the potential for reinvigorating an old idea for a new media world.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Psychology of Narcissism & How It Affects Brands

    by Lucia Mancuso, Jacob Small, Michael Dolan and Casie Stewart

    Society spends increasingly more time online, watching & reading about strangers. Is peep culture creating more narcissists or simply helping us connect through the sharing of our intimacies? Do users share content that they are passionate about & believe in or do they simply share content that influences how others perceive them? This panel will duke out diverse opinions on how brands use the internet famous to spread buzz about products & services, what this means for the future of marketing & how this effects everyone's behavior online. As time passes will positive sentiment towards an influencer inevitably change to negative? Is influencer marketing changing how we behave online & in our everyday? Is peep culture & narcissism shaping our world, playing a part in marketing & influencing our sharing & buying decisions? Come join our internet culture obsessed panel consisting of a psychologist, blogging pioneer, community manager & online lifestyle blogger/ self proclaimed narcissist.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Secret Path to Success in Online Video

    by Burnie Burns, Barry Blumberg, Dina Kaplan and Sean Plott

    There is a clear path to success with online video, but it's counter to conventional wisdom and everything you've learned about traditional media. Learn from the best in the business how producers are creating sustainable series, growing audiences and brand so they can hire staffs and production companies to support them and become the new media mogul. The answers to how and why they do this, and succeed, will surprise you.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage video

  • How Comics Journalism Is Saving Your Media

    by Ronald Wimberly, Susie Cagle, Matt Bors, Sarah Jaffe and Erin Polgreen

    While traditional journalism struggles to find its footing, comics journalism is inherently stylish, uniquely suited to sharing via social media, and popular as hell. During this panel, we'll share findings gleaned from editors, journalists and artists who have stretched the limits of comics to tell complicated stories in a variety of formats, from traditional paneled storytelling to interactive web pieces. We’ll also discuss how this creative nonfiction can impact public policy and reach a broader audience.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Open Web, Open News: Reporters & Developers Remix

    by Dan Sinker, Emily Bell, Mohamed Nanabhay and Andrew Leimdorfer

    We're experiencing the birth of a new era: Legacy news organizations are beginning the process of moving beyond their print and broadcast past, while new, all-web reporting outfits begin to chart a path into a new future. In the process, exciting new discussions of how the culture of the open web intersects with the culture of the newsroom are growing ever more frequent. All of this has kicked off a wave of innovation throughout the journalism space that has seen leaps forward in real-time reporting, data visualization, back-end technology, and much more. But it's nothing compared to the innovations to come.

    Recognizing the many opportunities to facilitate community and empower webmakers to build real tools, the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership was formed in 2011. It has kicked off a year of design challenges that culminated in placing technology fellows in some of the world's best newsrooms, charged with creating code for new kinds of news.

    As the partnership enters its second year, this conversation will address the broad implications of this new kind of collaboration: How do we work together to innovate in the news space? How do we bring the best practices of both disciplines to bear on the other? How do we broaden the scope, spread the code, and create real impact?

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Content and Coding Are Not Commodities

    by Andrei Scheinkman, Benjamin Balter, Raju Narisetti and Jennifer 8. Lee

    Geeks see code as art and content as stuff. Journalists see code as stuff and content as the art. Geeks may say "provide me content" while journalists are like "build this site." With that kind of attitudes, it's hard to get buy-in from the other side. What coders and journalists should understand: they have more in common than not. Both sides are motivated by their craft and a desire to feel that an audience is experiencing their work, whether though prose or programming. They want to work with smart people on interesting problems. Coders and writers are not interchangeable. Great talent can be an order of magnitude more effective than mediocre talent.Though discussions of case studies from The Washington Post, New York Times, Huffington Post and the federal government, this panel will explain from both the journalists' and the programmers' perspectives how to speak a language they will understand.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • On the Internet, Everyone Knows You're a Dog

    by Michael Sippey, Rick Webb, Jessica Zollman, Heather Champ and Ted Rheingold

    As former Representative Anthony Weiner discovered the hard way, remaining anonymous in this hyper-social world is becoming nearlyimpossible. But what sucks for Anthony Wiener has been great for conversations on the Web – with the rise of authenticated platforms, anonymous comments and posts are giving way to real dialogs between authors and their audiences.
    For example, when comments on popular sites like TechCrunch became tied to real Facebook profiles, the experience went from a juvenile insult-fest to a civil value-add information exchange. There’s undoubtedly progress to be made, but authentication and social platforms are giving us a glimpse of what the future holds: low friction ways to connect your opinion to a piece of content, easier ways to see what your friends care about, and better ways to insert your POV.
    For better or worse, it’s becoming harder to remain anonymous online. In this panel discussion, we will discuss how technology is changing online self-expression.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol