Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 of type Panel in Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

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Friday 9th March 2012

  • Digital vs. Print: Storyboard to Digital Delivery

    by Keith Barraclough, Chris Wilkes, Joe Simon, Liz Schimel and Perry Solomon

    This panel offers an insider’s guide into the process behind creating customized digital magazine content and configuring it for delivery across multiple mobile devices. Moderated by Next Issue Media CTO, Keith Barraclough, the panelists include CTOs, digital marketers, programmers and digital publishing pioneers from major publishing houses who all have a hand in generating unique digital content along with translating print content into an interactive format. The panelists will share feedback from real-world users describing how they interact with digital content differently than print. Additional topics of discussion include: how advertisers are making the shift from print to digital, how technology is personalizing the magazine experience, how workflow tools have changed now that the month-long print lifecycle no longer applies and how publishers are collecting and using metadata to enhance the reader experience.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Popping Your Bubble: Stories of the Digital Divide

    by Dean Davis, Dee Davis, Eric Martin and Allison Aldridge-Saur

    At SXSW 2011, there were tweets where people were just coming to the realization that not everyone out there has a smart phone or tablet. This panel is designed to demonstrate how those who live and work in communities with limited access cope and compensate. The panel will represent people from rural areas and communities of color that deal with these issues every day. Discussion will be around obstacles to and solutions for getting broadband access, as well as how people creating sites and online tools that want to reach these audiences can engage with them.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Future of Lifestyle Media

    by Grace Bonney, Camille Styles, Tolly Moseley and Andrew Wagner

    Lifestyle media is big business. And in a down economy, DIY culture (sewing, canning, etc.) has seen a trendy resurgence. But the lifestyle industry is rapidly changing. How can you break in? Once in, how do you stay current? This panel will first define the nebulous term “lifestyle media,” from national design magazines with full staffs to small, personal blogs headed by creative individuals. Who is the target market for lifestyle media? What do they want / need? How can you transition from being a lone, creative blogger to a nationally known resource? Second, we’ll discuss innovation in lifestyle media. Where is the innovation? How does the rise in online lifestyle media change the traditional media landscape? What’s the future of lifestyle media? Finally, we’ll discuss the nuts & bolts of lifestyle media. How do you hone your focus? Is your expertise more style-oriented? Are you a foodie? How can you channel your interests and knowledge in the right direction? Our panelists include the founder of one of the world's most popular design blogs, and editor-in-chief of a national lifestyle print magazine. Get a behind-the-scenes look at the relationship between print and online, and how major players in lifestyle media are working together.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage note

  • Hyper Local Public TV Station Models: Content 3.0

    by Kliff Kuehl, Kevin Dando, Angee Simmons, David Neff and Shane Guiter

    How are public television stations positioning themselves for the future? Are they producers, curators of existing content or simply another model all together? The legacy model of public TV is changing -- quickly. Now, stations are masters of content strands, weaving together social media, geolocation, web, mobile, traditional TV and production into an amazing new product. Come see how new models are emerging and leading the next generation of public television.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Power of Visual Storytelling

    by Becky Johns, CC Chapman, Karl Gude and Charlie Wollborg

    A story can be told in a million different ways and constantly improving technology makes it even more fun for anyone to tell their story in their own unique way.

    Brands and individuals equally need to embrace that they must tell their story to the world. Through the use of photos, video, words and audio your story can be shared in unlimited ways.

    This panel will feature a variety of individuals who have worked with all budgets and all sizes of organizations to present their visual story. You'll leave inspired, informed and ready to go out and embrace the visual.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Fashion Fog: Redefining Content & Commerce

    by Allison Kellman, Alisa Gould-Simon, Lauren Sherman, Claire Mazur and Erica Cerulo

    Commerce and content have never been so intertwined. Fashion editors are jumping ship from magazines to join leading e-commerce platforms, while editorial destinations are introducing local deals and e-shops left and right. But does content really generate commerce? What do social shopping and style sharing apps, YouTube's haul community and digital influencer-focused affiliate programs say about the way consumers are spending their time and their money?

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

Saturday 10th March 2012

  • A Penny Press for the Digital Age

    by Tom Stites, Jessamyn West, Fiona Morgan, Norberto Santana Jr and Ryan Thornburg

    In the 19th century, the “penny press” revolutionized journalism by covering news that appealed to the broadest possible public. Today, as media organizations struggle to monetize online coverage and chase tech trends, they have all but abandoned less-than-affluent readers — and with them, the commitment to public service journalism. According to Pew, fewer than half of Americans who make under $75K a year go online for news. This panel will reconsider the digital divide in terms of information as well as technology. We’ll explore how low-income and working-class people – the majority of Americans – can be included in the future of online news. We'll discuss new models for participatory, data-driven local journalism. We’re not trying to save newspapers or kill them off. Our aim is to help bring journalism back to those who punch a clock. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Big Ol' Babies: Why Baby Boomers=Public Media FAIL

    by Adam Schweigert, Dee Kapila, Jonathan Coffman and Vivian Schiller

    Public Media, or at least the public media funding model, has been cited as the future of the journalism industry. As Public Media continues to face funding challenges, there is an ongoing face-off between digital natives working towards innovation and baby boomers working to stay buoyant during uncertain times. The two groups seem to constantly disagree about what public media should be doing at this moment in time. Are the decisions made by the older generation too safe? Conversely, where are baby boomers' decisions risky but misguided? Legacy staff need to regard their younger colleagues as valuable resources necessary for the survival and success of public media moving forward. What themes of conflict are emerging between the two generations across organizations? This panel identifies the top 10 key challenges contributing to the stagnancy of public media and explores what actions we would take to ensure public media's future if we were in charge.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • When Copyright Trolls Attack

    by Charles Mudd, Parker Higgins and Mitch Stoltz

    On 2010, the U.S. Copyright Group quietly targeted tens of thousands BitTorrent users for legal action in federal court in Washington DC. The defendants, who started off as unnamed "John Does", were accused of having downloaded independent films such as "Far Cry," "Steam Experiment," and "The Hurt Locker" without authorization. The organization went on to sue thousands of defendants at a time, hoping to extract quick and easy settlements. By the end of the year, U.S. Copyright Group had been joined by similar companies that sued people all over the United States for allegedly downloading porn and for reproducing newspaper articles in blogs. In less than two years, copyright trolls have sued almost 200,000 people.

    Who are the copyright trolls? What should you do if you are a content owner approached by copyright trolls? What should you do if you are one of the 200,000 people being sued? And what is being done about this new and disturbing business model?

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Real-Time Newsjacking & a Cold-Blooded Tweeter

    by Remco Marinus, Grant Hunter, Esty Gorman, Michael Logan and Bronx Zoo Cobra

    At UrgentGenius.com, we've spent 2 years gathering examples of ideas that have achieved stand-out by hijacking the news or have created real-time content. For SXSWi we've searched the globe to find real-time topical genius. The result? Well, it sounds like a bad joke: What do you get when 3 strangers – a Brit, a Dutchman and a man from Taiwan - walk into an Austin bar with a lady snake that promptly escapes. Chaos and a hopefully engaging panel ensues. The sharp-tongued @BronxZoosCobra gained 200,000 followers as she live-tweeted her escape from the zoo. She is the second-most followed animal on Twitter and will be the conference's first reptile speaker. Michael Logan heads up the content arm for satirical animators NMA while Remco Marinus shot a new commercial every day for IKEA's 365 campaign. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Rude Awakening: Content Strategy Is Super Hard

    by Karen McGrane, Kristina Halvorson, Joe Gollner, Erin Kissane and Mark McCormick

    It's official: "content strategy" has become a trendy buzzword phrase that everyone is using to describe everything remotely related to content. SEO content strategy! Social media content strategy! Content marketing content strategy! Wait. This sucks. Weren't we just starting to focus on The Important Stuff? The messy, complicated content stuff that companies have been ignoring for years? What needs to happen now if we're finally going to get this content thing right? Four of the brightest minds in content strategy will tackle some the toughest issues our companies are facing: cross-platform distribution, governance, legacy content, distributed publishing, and trying to prepare our content for future technologies we can't possibly predict. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • The New Hollywood: Building Celebrity Brands Online

    by Nathan Coyle, Meghan McCain, Miles Beckett and Kevin Winston

    Lights, Camera, Log-on. The evolution of social media has provided personalities the opportunity to manage & build their brand online. Celebrities create & share original content with followers & often interact with them directly. Leveraging the existing fan base, celebrities are building huge online followings for their sites, Twitter, Facebook & more. Join the innovators of social media platforms for Lauren Conrad, Meghan McCain, the Jonas Brothers & Kraft and Walgreens as they discuss the impact for celebrities & brands. Online celebrity communities provide significant value to marketers & brands & financial opportunity for the personalities. This panel discusses the value, growth and phenomenon of celebrity brands online.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Data Visualization and the Future of Research

    by Joshua Greenberg, Lee Dirks, Marguerite Avery and Johan Bollen

    Data are the building blocks of information, fueling our algorithmic digital world. But with so much data being produced, how can we process it? Visualization techniques allow users to understand vast amounts of data that we can’t parse. Get up to speed on techniques of data visualization from scientific researchers and scholars working in informatics, computer science, and physics – and see how these tools can help you understand Twitter. And data analysis and visualization isn’t just for science. The digital humanities movement shows us that innovative data practices aren’t just for science anymore. See innovative digital humanities research in data mining and visualization that will have you thinking differently about literature and history. This panel focuses on developments in data visualization strategies but will also covers the basics of data, some major issues with data analysis and data visualization, and prominent theories of visualization.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • The Curators and the Curated

    by Noah Brier, Maria Popova, Mia Quagliarello, Max Linsky and David Carr

    At the heart of our conversation: the relationship between publishers of original content and the web’s most influential curators. Seems simple, right? Content creators get eyeballs and curators get work to share. But with some curators dwarfing publications in size and influence, and with some publishers investing heavily in curation projects of their own, that relationship is getting a little complicated. We’ll get our hands dirty and break down just how important curators and publishers are to each other, how money plays into things and how attribution has become a lost art. Other fun stuff you’ll learn: what makes a curator influential, how content-creators can be curator friendly (and vice versa), and the evolving distinction between curation and aggregation. This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Copy Matters: Content Strategy for the Interface

    by Andy Chung, Tiffani Jones Brown, Amy Thibodeau, Dan Zambonini and D. Keith Robinson

    When it comes to space-constrained interface content (from the web down to the smallest smartphone app), every word has to communicate something important and create value. The problem? Typical content strategy techniques are hard to apply to interface copy, which means language is often slapped together at the last minute by developers. How can we adapt content strategy tools and tactics to an interface context? This panel will explore workable strategies for creating content that persuades, assists and informs in a few words or less.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Reporters & Evangelists: Politics of Online News

    by Andrew Gruen, Prajwal Ciryam, Mary O'Hara and Shira Toeplitz

    How much does ideology matter for online journalists and news sites? People talk about a fractured web of ideological bubbles where liberals go to Daily Kos and conservatives to The Daily Caller. But do more traditional media outlets use ideology as a way to make their brands stand out online? Does taking an ideological position on the Web damage a reporter's credibility? Is selling your ideology a good way to make a living on the internet?This panel assembles an all-star cast of reporters from the BBC, The Guardian, Politico, and even Ohmynews.com in Korea to debate that question. Between them they have written for some of the top online news sites on three continents and have appeared on ABC, CBS, CNN, CNBC, MSNBC, and FOX. Representing a range of political attitudes and journalistic creeds, the panel will seek to answer: What is the role of ideological journalism in online news? This Future of Journalism Track is sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Think Global, Blog Local: The Regional Tech Blog

    by Mike Bollinger, Sean Blanda, Rick Turoczy, Danny Schreiber and Danielle Morrill

    While TechCrunch, GigaOM, ReadWriteWeb and other major tech blogs inform tech enthusiasts of the more exciting and press-savvy startups, tech blogs such as Silicon Florist, Silicon Prairie News, TECHdotMN and Technically Philly are dedicated to continual coverage of both the loud and quiet startups in their area. This panel will look at the importance of regional tech blogs, how they got their start, revenue models and methods of gathering story leads as well as case studies of startups they've discovered that have gone on to capture national and international press.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

Sunday 11th March 2012

  • Publishing Models Transforming the Book

    by Molly Barton, Brian Altounian, Swanna MacNair, Jefferson Rabb and Rachel Deahl

    By the end of 2011 it is projected that E-books will account for a quarter of frontlist book sales. Bricks and mortar stores are fighting for a fraction of the retail business. Publishers are being more selective about—and paying less money for—the books they acquire. In short, the publishing industry is changing dramatically. With change comes opportunity and everyone from legacy publishing houses to entrepreneurial individuals are creating new business models that locate talent and package content in new ways. Is the book dead? No—it’s being re-imagined and redefined by these very people.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Storytelling Beyond Words: New Forms of Journalism

    by Stephen Buckley, Jim Brady, Bill Adair and Aron Pilhofer

    We are in the midst of a digital revolution, and yet journalistic storytelling remains trapped in the Stone Age. We have all sorts of digital tools at our disposal -- video, social media, interactive graphics, etc. -- and still our stories are boring. Our panel will help you think in new ways about storytelling forms. Instead of sending users to a separate link for a video, why not embed video into the story at strategic points? Instead of writing long articles analyzing the accuracy of a politician's statements, why not invent a meter that allows the audience to quickly see that for themselves? We'll offer examples of how journalists harness digital tools to reinvent storytelling in ways that delight audiences, elucidate complex issues, improve communities and strengthen democracy. This panel is for geeks who care about storytelling; it's for storytellers who care about digital tools; and it's for anyone who cares about the future of journalism.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Discoverability and the New World of Book PR

    by Calvin Reid, Barbara Cave Henricks, Rusty Shelton and Hollis Heimbouch

    Shelf space isn't what it used to be. A search on "leadership books" on Amazon returns more than 60,000 results. The same search on Google returns more than 130 million results. With retail bookstores increasingly giving way to digital devices, success in publishing is no longer about distribution, it's about discoverability.

    This session will detail the many changes that are taking place in the publishing industry and will explore how authors and publishers can set themselves up to succeed in this new environment. We will focus on teaching you how to leverage your platform and how to build meaningful relationships with media members ahead of a book launch.

    Increasingly journalists are taking a 'don't call us, we'll call you' approach to publicity, looking to connect directly with authors, experts, sources and great ideas via social media. So, how can you widen your net online to snag these media queries and, most importantly, impact discoverability? You'll learn how in this session.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Driving the Change: Public Media Goes Transmedia

    by Sue Schardt, Ellen Horne and Kara Oehler

    Public media—especially radio—has emerged as a seedbed for inventive producers driving a new culture of experimentation across traditional and digital platforms. Its unique legacy blends technical ingenuity, a vision aimed at serving the "greater good" of society, and a hybrid business model that combines government and foundation funding with support from users. We'll bring together producers at the vanguard of reinvention to consider how they are crossing both platform and industry boundaries to create pathbreaking transmedia documentaries, participatory installations, and storytelling tools.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Once & Future King: Can Syndication Save Content?

    by Todd Martin, Christel van der Boom, Jesse Levine and John Pettitt

    The publishing industry has always embraced new technology as a primary driver of success. Syndication was once the solution for an industry challenged by economics, technology, and globalism, allowing content to reach the widest audience at the greatest cost savings. But it hasn’t changed much in the last century. As new practices of media consumption emerge, publishers have seen their fortunes decline precipitously. While content may still be king, the distribution and consumption of that content have become increasingly problematic. Caught between outmoded business models and the disruptive dynamics of digital media, publishers now occupy an untenable position that impacts their ability to remain competitive and profitable. Can syndication once again save publishing by providing new modes of distribution, consumption, and revenue? This panel will discuss current syndication practices and explore the potential for reinvigorating an old idea for a new media world.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • Psychology of Narcissism & How It Affects Brands

    by Lucia Mancuso, Jacob Small, Michael Dolan and Casie Stewart

    Society spends increasingly more time online, watching & reading about strangers. Is peep culture creating more narcissists or simply helping us connect through the sharing of our intimacies? Do users share content that they are passionate about & believe in or do they simply share content that influences how others perceive them? This panel will duke out diverse opinions on how brands use the internet famous to spread buzz about products & services, what this means for the future of marketing & how this effects everyone's behavior online. As time passes will positive sentiment towards an influencer inevitably change to negative? Is influencer marketing changing how we behave online & in our everyday? Is peep culture & narcissism shaping our world, playing a part in marketing & influencing our sharing & buying decisions? Come join our internet culture obsessed panel consisting of a psychologist, blogging pioneer, community manager & online lifestyle blogger/ self proclaimed narcissist.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Secret Path to Success in Online Video

    by Burnie Burns, Barry Blumberg, Dina Kaplan and Sean Plott

    There is a clear path to success with online video, but it's counter to conventional wisdom and everything you've learned about traditional media. Learn from the best in the business how producers are creating sustainable series, growing audiences and brand so they can hire staffs and production companies to support them and become the new media mogul. The answers to how and why they do this, and succeed, will surprise you.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage video

  • How Comics Journalism Is Saving Your Media

    by Ronald Wimberly, Susie Cagle, Matt Bors, Sarah Jaffe and Erin Polgreen

    While traditional journalism struggles to find its footing, comics journalism is inherently stylish, uniquely suited to sharing via social media, and popular as hell. During this panel, we'll share findings gleaned from editors, journalists and artists who have stretched the limits of comics to tell complicated stories in a variety of formats, from traditional paneled storytelling to interactive web pieces. We’ll also discuss how this creative nonfiction can impact public policy and reach a broader audience.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Open Web, Open News: Reporters & Developers Remix

    by Dan Sinker, Emily Bell, Mohamed Nanabhay and Andrew Leimdorfer

    We're experiencing the birth of a new era: Legacy news organizations are beginning the process of moving beyond their print and broadcast past, while new, all-web reporting outfits begin to chart a path into a new future. In the process, exciting new discussions of how the culture of the open web intersects with the culture of the newsroom are growing ever more frequent. All of this has kicked off a wave of innovation throughout the journalism space that has seen leaps forward in real-time reporting, data visualization, back-end technology, and much more. But it's nothing compared to the innovations to come.

    Recognizing the many opportunities to facilitate community and empower webmakers to build real tools, the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership was formed in 2011. It has kicked off a year of design challenges that culminated in placing technology fellows in some of the world's best newsrooms, charged with creating code for new kinds of news.

    As the partnership enters its second year, this conversation will address the broad implications of this new kind of collaboration: How do we work together to innovate in the news space? How do we bring the best practices of both disciplines to bear on the other? How do we broaden the scope, spread the code, and create real impact?

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • Content and Coding Are Not Commodities

    by Andrei Scheinkman, Benjamin Balter, Raju Narisetti and Jennifer 8. Lee

    Geeks see code as art and content as stuff. Journalists see code as stuff and content as the art. Geeks may say "provide me content" while journalists are like "build this site." With that kind of attitudes, it's hard to get buy-in from the other side. What coders and journalists should understand: they have more in common than not. Both sides are motivated by their craft and a desire to feel that an audience is experiencing their work, whether though prose or programming. They want to work with smart people on interesting problems. Coders and writers are not interchangeable. Great talent can be an order of magnitude more effective than mediocre talent.Though discussions of case studies from The Washington Post, New York Times, Huffington Post and the federal government, this panel will explain from both the journalists' and the programmers' perspectives how to speak a language they will understand.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

  • On the Internet, Everyone Knows You're a Dog

    by Michael Sippey, Rick Webb, Jessica Zollman, Heather Champ and Ted Rheingold

    As former Representative Anthony Weiner discovered the hard way, remaining anonymous in this hyper-social world is becoming nearlyimpossible. But what sucks for Anthony Wiener has been great for conversations on the Web – with the rise of authenticated platforms, anonymous comments and posts are giving way to real dialogs between authors and their audiences.
    For example, when comments on popular sites like TechCrunch became tied to real Facebook profiles, the experience went from a juvenile insult-fest to a civil value-add information exchange. There’s undoubtedly progress to be made, but authentication and social platforms are giving us a glimpse of what the future holds: low friction ways to connect your opinion to a piece of content, easier ways to see what your friends care about, and better ways to insert your POV.
    For better or worse, it’s becoming harder to remain anonymous online. In this panel discussion, we will discuss how technology is changing online self-expression.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Capitol A-D, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

Monday 12th March 2012

  • Brand Journalism in the Real-World

    by Jesse Noyes, Karen Wickre, Erica Swallow and Ann Handley

    Brand journalism is often defined by what it isn’t. It’s not just blogging, it’s not PR, but it isn’t traditional reporting either. This session will focus not only on defining brand journalism, but also will go in-depth on what brand journalism looks like in action, how organizations can incorporate editorial practices and how traditional journalists can make the shift. MarketingProfs Chief Content Officer Ann Handley will sit down with Twitter’s Editorial Director Karen Wickre, Eloqua’s in-house reporter Jesse Noyes and Erica Swallow of Southern Swallow Productions to discuss what adaptations need to be made in corporate environments, how to mitigate bias, and what policies you should institute to ensure the emerging practice’s integrity. It’s brand journalism, with a real world emphasis. This session is sponsored by Eloqua.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 12th March

    In Capitol E-H, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

  • State of the Media Democracy

    by Phil Asmundson and Robert Underwood

    Digitization is transforming the media and entertainment industry full stop. But is the industry evolving quickly enough to meet consumer demands—demands that differ greatly from one generation to the next? In this discussion, industry executives will react to data from Deloitte’s sixth edition of the State of the Media Democracy Survey which provides insight into the media consumption behaviors and preferences of generations around the world.

    For more information on the State of the Media Democracy survey visit: www.deloitte.com/us/mediademocracy

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 12th March

    In Creekside I & II, Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

    Coverage audio clip

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