Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 of type Solo in Austin Convention Center

View as grid

Your current filters are…

Clear

Friday 9th March 2012

  • Perfect Timing: Evolving GLBT Suicide Prevention

    by Dino Hainline

    Luck favors the prepared. Build it and they will come. Pithy statements like these are recited on the belief that it takes movement to start action. Shortly before the “It Gets Better” campaign took off on Facebook and YouTube in response to the increase in teen suicide and bullying of GLBT youth, The Trevor Project – one of the main beneficiaries of “It Gets Better” – worked with Sensis on a complete redesign of their Website. Sensis approached Trevor as a pro-bono client and worked with them on increasing their focus from one of traditional development to digital outreach. Sensis and Trevor engaged hundreds of GLBT youth in an online research panel which helped the organization recognize the increasing popularity of digital and social media. The new look and feel of the Website and increased focus on social media in turn created a push for an institutional rebranding that breathed new life into this critical organization. With almost miraculous timing, the site launch and new digital focus coincided with the launch of the “It Gets Better” campaign. Hundreds of individual testimonials have been seen and shared by hundreds of thousands online. Google, NBC Universal and President Obama have all contributed videos with messages of hope and encouragement. In turn, this movement has helped galvanize the Trevor Project’s suicide prevention efforts and transform them as an organization. This panel will discuss how timing, perseverance and forward thinking with digital media helped give prominence to a pervasive problem in the gay, lesbian and transgender community.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Rethinking Civilization for the Social Age

    by Don Tapscott

    The continuing global economic and political crisis should be wakeup call to the world. We need to rethink and rebuild many of the organizations and institutions that have served us well for decades, even centuries, but are no longer able. Many traditional economic and social pillars of the industrial age have come to the end of their life cycle. Yet, enabled by the digital revolution there is dramatic change occurring everywhere, from Cairo streets to Wall Street, from the lecture halls of our universities to the halls of government. How can we rethink our economy and society for the new age?

    Don Tapscott is one of the world's leading thinkers about new new technology, new media and innovaiton in business and society. He is the author of 14 widely read books, most recently Macrowikinomics, and was recently chosen by the Thinkers50 organization as the 9th most important living business thinker in the world.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Exhibit Hall 5, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage sketch note

  • The Cloud as Skynet: Conquering Digital Overload

    by Steve Rosenbaum

    Everybody talks about the “cloud” as if it is a digital savior. A beautiful white fluffy (free) cloud on a blue-sky day. Sounds nice, huh? But what if it’s a storm cloud? Today – there is a mad rush to move pictures, video, and event private data to the cloud. We live in a world today of constant connection. We’re blessed with unlimited access to pervasive communications. We are, in fact, shifting from an era of mere content abundance to an avalanche of undifferentiated data. Our hard drives runneth over. So - you can't blame your self for wanting to move to the cloud. Unlimited space for all your crap - and free. Who wouldn't sign up? Today the noisy web has resulted in the emergence of a handful of private, walled garden webs. A closed web. Will our cloud providers become information overloads? Can we save the web from privatization, and regain control over our data and our identities? Only if we move fast. Before ‘Big Data’ becomes ‘Big Government.’ Find out how digital ‘overload’ can insure power in the human web.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom EF, Austin Convention Center

  • Social Media Sharecropping: Black Tech Adoption

    by Gina Mccauley

    This panel is about the many ways in which modern internet adoption and use mirrors the development of agrarian sharecropping in the South following the Civil War- whereby African Americans provided massive amounts of labor to make other people rich, but could never move beyond basic subsistence living. According to the Pew Internet& American Life Project,as of May 2011, 25% of online African Americans now use Twitter, compared with 9% of such whites. African-American and Latino internet users are each significantly more likely than whites to be Twitter adopters. One out of ten African-American internet users now visit Twitter on a typical day—that is double the rate for Latinos and nearly four times the rate for whites. Pew research has also indicated that Blacks and Latinos are significantly more likely to use mobile devices to text message, use social networking sites, use the internet, watch and record videos, make charitable donation, use email, play games, listen to music, instant message and post multimedia content online. Yet disproportionate consumption of technology among Blacks, does not appear to be translating into wealth building and job creation in a community facing a 16.1 unemployment rate. Techcrunch founder, Michael Arrington caused a minor controversy when CNN’s Soledad O’Brien asked him about Black entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and Arrington replied “I don’t know a single Black entrepreneur.” In 2012, the definition of Digital Divide appears to have shifted from access to technology to how communities of color leverage that technology.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Room 5ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Teaching Touch: Tapworthy Touchscreen Design

    by Josh Clark

    Discover the rules of thumb for finger-friendly design. Touch gestures are sweeping away buttons, menus and windows from mobile devices—and even from the next version of Windows. Find out why those familiar desktop widgets are weak replacements for manipulating content directly, and learn to craft touchscreen interfaces that effortlessly teach users new gesture vocabularies. The challenge: gestures are invisible, without the visual cues offered by buttons and menus. As your touchscreen app sheds buttons, how do people figure out how to use the damn thing? Learn to lead your audience by the hand (and fingers) with practical techniques that make invisible gestures obvious. Designer Josh Clark (author of O'Reilly books "Tapworthy" and "Best iPhone Apps") mines a variety of surprising sources for interface inspiration and design patterns. Along the way, discover the subtle power of animation, why you should be playing lots more video games, and why a toddler is your best beta tester.

    Questions answered:
    1. How should UI layouts evolve to accommodate the ergonomics of fingers and thumbs?
    2. Why are buttons a hack? Why aren't they as effective as more direct touch gestures?
    3. How can users understand how to use apps that have no labeled menus or buttons?
    4. What's the proper role of skeuomorphic design (realistic 3D metaphors) in teaching touch?
    5. How can animation provide contextual help to teach gestures effortlessly? How does game design point the way here?

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • The Bombastic Brilliance of "Black Twitter"

    by Dr Goddess

    "Black Twitter" has captured the imagination of the online world. In 2010, a Pew Research Study highlighted trends demonstrating Twitter usage was disproportionately Black and female. Next, journalists for Slate, The Huffington Post, Time, etc., began to explore and analyze the world of "Black Twitter" and kept getting most of it wrong. The fascination continues; but explorations into "what Black people are doing on Twitter" tend to get it wrong, most of the time. Like the innovation of Hip Hop, Black Twitter shows that despite the seeming universality of technology, people and culture matter. This session will demonstrate the "Black Twitter" phenomenon's intelligence, humor, unique language production, emoticons, hashtags, corrective narratives, cultural critique, organizing and entrepreneurial success, enhanced by fictive kin relationships that stun, amaze and inspire the world. Learn from an American / Africana Studies scholar, artist and activist writing a book on "Black Twitter.”

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

  • The Secret Lives of the Brain

    by David Eagleman

    If the conscious mind--the part you consider you--is just the tip of the iceberg in the brain, what is all the rest doing? Neuroscientist David Eagleman, author of the New York Times bestseller Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, shows that most of what you do, think and believe is generated by parts of your brain to which you have no access. Here's the exposé about the non-conscious brain and all the machinery under the hood that keeps the show going.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom EF, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • The World Turns to Ustream in Times of Crisis

    by Brad Hunstable

    In the wake of the Japan tsunami disaster derived from one of Japan’s largest earthquakes in record history, over 52.6 million viewers tuned into Ustream to watch the catastrophe in real-time. Viewers around the world united on Ustream to watch the events unfold live and search for any mention of their loved ones through the integrated Social Stream / chat experience. The power of Ustream affected major Japanese news networks that immediately syndicated their aerial news footage directly to Ustream’s platform in order to enhance global distribution.

    In this session, we will discuss how live video sharing heightens the true value of its purpose and impact on the world. It is instilling the need among personal and professional communities to integrate live video into their way of life and business. Live broadcasted content is growing exponentially causing more memorable moments to be shared with the entire world through non-traditional media and platforms. The growing interest speaks to how sophisticated live video technology is enhancing. Sharing live moments is no longer associated with standard televisions. Instead, syndication of live content is accessible through computers, smart TVs, streaming devices, and more.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 9th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • A Crash Course in Becoming SuperBetter

    by Jane McGonigal

    In 2009, a mild traumatic brain injury changed the way that game designer Jane McGonigal thought about everything -- literally. She spent a year recovering -- struggling to think clearly, be physically active, and find a new sense of purpose. Her journey back to health led her to invent a new form of game design, aimed at having a measurable positive impact on players' real lives, and fused with scientific research at every level. In this talk, you'll see the first results of that process: a game called SuperBetter. You'll hear about the game's first clinical trials, and get a crash course in getting SuperBetter yourself: Find out how to turn weak social ties into allies. Learn how to experience "gain without pain" (or what scientists call "post-ecstatic growth"). Discover the secrets of "Lazy Exercise" and "Ninja Weight Loss". Find out what a two-minute "Future Boost" is, and why it's the most important thing you can do each week for your physical and mental health. From the mind of a game designer comes a radically disruptive model for integrating breakthrough science into our daily lives.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Exhibit Hall 5, Austin Convention Center

  • Applying Behavior Design

    by Chris Risdon

    More and more products and services are designed around motivating users and incentivizing change. Products and services in finance, health and the environment, among other areas, are increasingly designed around influencing behavior. There are useful academic models and patterns for applying persuasion techniques. Now it's time to understand how this is applied practically to our products and services. While understanding how powerful behavior design can influence people to be better, we will also discuss and illustrate how we design these products and services so that they serve the interest of customers, as well as meet business needs. As designers, the choices we make invariably influence users, and now we are harnessing what we know about designing around behavior to produce products and services that have a positive social impact on people's lives. It's time to move beyond just the concepts and theories and understand how to apply persuasive design responsibly.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • Mining Diversity: Developing a Community of Color

    by Trevite Willis

    Communities of color are never a homogeneous or monolithic group. So developing an ethnically diverse community will require more than focusing on statistics such as income and education levels. Knowing where to find communities, how they engage and what platforms work best are essential in developing campaigns that can reach multiple communities. The session will discuss best practices and examples from companies & brands who have successfully developed communities.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Room 5ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • The Lean Startup: The Science of Entrepreneurship

    by Eric Ries

    The Lean Startup debuted at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. This talk draws on stories and insights from the book, explaining the new science of entrepreneurship. Most startups fail. But many of those failures are preventable. The Lean Startup is a new approach being adopted across the globe, changing the way companies are built and new products are launched. Eric Ries defines a startup as an organization dedicated to creating something new under conditions of extreme uncertainty. This is just as true for one person in a garage or a group of seasoned professionals in a Fortune 500 boardroom. What they have in common is a mission to penetrate that fog of uncertainty to discover a successful path to a sustainable business. The Lean Startup approach fosters companies that are both more capital efficient and that leverage human creativity more effectively. Inspired by lessons from lean manufacturing, it relies on “validated learning,” rapid scientific experimentation, as well as a number of counterintuitive practices that shorten product development cycles, measure actual progress without resorting to vanity metrics, and learn what customers really want. It enables a company to shift directions with agility, altering plans inch by inch, minute by minute.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

  • What’s ‘The Next Big Thing’ in Social Networking?

    by Joel Simkhai

    Location-based technology has played a significant role in the recent expansion and growth of social media. That role is set to further explode in the coming years. As the leading all-male mobile location-based social network in the world, Grindr has created a global brand that in the past two years has amassed a user base of over 3 million users in 192 countries. The Grindr team hopes to evolve this mobile GPS experience with Blendr – a new location-based mobile app for everyone in the world that lets you discover, meet, and interact with the people around you. This presentation will focus on the future of location-based social networking and how we can make it easier to meet new people around us. Discussion will include issues ranging from the idea behind a start-up to the implementation and development of that idea into a product, to growing a user base and using social media options to create brand awareness and loyalty.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Friday 9th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

Saturday 10th March 2012

  • Guerilla Marketing @ Your Library

    by Cathleen Ash

    Getting Tech Savvy in rural Texas – a few of the students will join me as we present how we turned a closed, defunct, dirty library into the happening spot on campus - now including a gaming club, open mic night, library club, blogs, podcasts and more. In just three years, we've quadrupled usage numbers, encouraged all-community relations, appeared on the local news and radio, and engaged more students with technology than ever before – all at almost a tenth of the budget of the lowest performing schools in Texas (less than $2/student/book verses $16+).
    Specific grants, donors, community buy-in (Laura Bush Library Foundation, DonorsChoose.org, Project Hope, Fine Arts Department, Austin Lyric Opera) have pulled together and the students are more experienced, tech-savvy and ready to work for chances to go places and get things.
    We will showcase how we did it, what we used, and provide specific ideas about student use of tech at the rural level – and how to increase it.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Rhapsody to Year 0: Music & Publishing Go Digital

    by Rob Reid

    With book sales going digital much faster than music sales did, why is the publishing industry growing, and not imploding? How threatened are publishers & labels as content creators start developing audiences directly through iTunes and Kindles? What does this mean for independent writers & musicians? And do our deranged copyright laws benefit anyone but profiteering lawyers? Rob Reid’s talk will compare the online challenges faced by publishing vs. music. Rob founded Listen.com, which created Rhapsody – the first digital music service fully licensed by every major label. Rhapsody remains one of the largest online music services, and is owned by MTV and RealNetworks. Now an author, Rob’s in the thick of another industry’s digital transformation. Rob’s book Year Zero (published by Random House this July) addresses some of these issues. In it, aliens seek to erase the ruinous fines on their vast collections of pirated American music by destroying the Earth. Parts of it are made up.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 12AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Apply the Lessons of Open Source to Any Business

    by Ruth Suehle

    “Open source” was once a way to describe software code and a collaborative model for its development. It's now a business model, an education model, and the future of government. It's changing our lives through its principles: Openness. Transparency. Collaboration. Rapid prototyping.

    It's also the best way to get your ideas heard, make the world a better a place, and still turn a profit. No matter what business you're in, you can take a lesson from open source.

    Do you or your company apply open source principles like collaboration and transparency daily? Many are, and the old habits are cracking. New business methods are taking root. Schools are turning to open source to improve education. Even governments are embracing openness and sharing more.

    Learn how the principles that made open source an innovative software development model can stimulate innovation and make the world a better place--in any part of any business anywhere. Simply put, the future is openness.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 9ABC, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    by Jen Simmons

    HTML5. It's more than paving the cowpaths. It's more than markup. There's a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We've been limited in what's possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That's not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don't just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • The Complexity Curve: How to Design for Simplicity

    by David Hogue

    Interfaces and devices are providing more and more power and functionality to people, and in many cases this additional power is accompanied by increasing complexity. Although people have more experience and are more sophisticated, it still takes time to learn new interfaces, information, and interactions. Although we are able to learn and use these often difficult interfaces, we increasingly seek and appreciate simplicity.

    The Complexity Curve describes how a project moves from boundless opportunity and wonderful ideas to requirements checklists and constraints then finally (but only rarely) to simplicity and elegance. Where many projects call themselves complete when the necessary features have been included, few push forward and strive to deliver the pleasing and delightful experiences that arise from simplicity, focus, and purpose.

    In this session, David M. Hogue, Ph.D. - VP of Experience Design, applied psychologist, and adjunct faculty member at San Francisco State University - will introduce the Complexity Curve, discuss why our innovative ideas seem to fade over the course of a project, explain why "feature complete" is not the same as "optimal experience", and offer some methods for driving projects toward simplicity and elegance.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom BC, Austin Convention Center

  • The Power of Fear in Networked Publics

    by danah boyd

    This solo presentation will cover the culture of fear and the consequences of visibility. Acclaimed researcher danah boyd will weave together the predator panic and bullying phenomenon with the socio-political dynamics around otherness, the rise of fear alongside the increased ability to connect with others around the globe, the empowering rhetoric of the Arab Spring along the rise of local networks of power. She will call into question some of our utopian assumptions about all of the automatic democratic possibilities of technology and offer a challenge to folks about the need to step out of our techno-bubble and engage with people who are fearful of technology.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom EF, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Brazilian Youth: Dreams, Activism, Hyperconnection

    by Carla Albertuni

    The Brazilian Dream project is a qualitative and quantitative research - the first to promote a view that explores what the 18-24 year-old youth thinks about Brazil, and what they think they can do to impact the country development.

    This session will present an overview of the main findings of the research.

    It will cover how world and local drivers are affecting the way youngsters think, live and act for their country.

    It will provide an understanding of how the perspective they have of the main social institutions is changing and why.

    The study reveals who are the young innovators, changemakers, social activists that are already doing something that is meant to change Brazil - how they act, which projects they are involved with.

    The output of this 18-month project is rich with insights, quantitative data and inspiration for anyone who wants to go beyond the economic-based visions that have been surrounding the idea of an "emerging country". It helps understand the behaviors that are behind the take-off Brazil's being going through.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 10AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Designing for Content Management Systems

    by Jared Ponchot

    The job of a web designer these days includes designing for content that changes, is highly dynamic, and often does not yet exist. Gone are the halcyon days of static, 5 page websites that are just as rigid as a printed brochure (let's be honest, we don't miss that). This reality has created a great deal of debate within our industry and a fair amount of difficulty in our design processes.

    In this session we'll cover some basic design concepts and principles that can be applied when designing for CMS-driven websites. We'll also outline some tips and tricks for your design process, and explore some of the biggest hurdles and potential pitfalls in designing for yet created and ever-changing content.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom BC, Austin Convention Center

  • Emotional Equations to Connect with Your Customers

    by Chip Conley

    Chip Conley is the founder and was the CEO of America's second largest boutique hotel company. Initially, he thought he needed to be superhuman to be successful, but after two dozen years as CEO, he realized that he just needed to be a super human to create the habitat for success that arose at Joie de Vivre Hospitality. Using iconic psychology theories from Abraham Maslow (PEAK) and Viktor Frankl (Emotional Equations), Chip wrote a couple of best-selling books dedicated to helping business leaders understand how to be more emotionally intelligent in the workplace. Using a series of equations he's created with psychologist and mathematicians, Chip will help you understand the emotional building blocks that create anxiety, disappointment, joy, authenticity, and wisdom. Perfect for anyone wanting to understand themselves, their fellow employees, and their customers.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom EF, Austin Convention Center

  • HTML5 and CSS3: Does Now Really Mean Now?

    by Chris Mills and Chris Mills

    The browser vendors love them! The browser fans and cutting edge designers are producing some really remarkable stuff, but what do HTML5 and CSS3 really mean for you, the pragmatic designer on the street? If you sidle up to one of those guys and whisper "but what about IE6 support", they are likely to slap you in the face, or run away with their hands clamped over their ears, yelling "la lala lala, I can't hear you." In this talk, Chris Mills will have a look at some of the new features of HTML5 and CSS3 - new semantics, video, media queries, rounded corners, web fonts, drop shadows and more. He will show real world examples, and then look at how they actually perform on those shady older browsers we are often called on to support. He will then look at strategies for providing support for those older browsers, including using JavaScript, fallbacks, and progressive enhancement.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom A, Austin Convention Center

  • The Great Library Swindle: Your Rights Are at Risk

    by Carson Block

    Libraries, oft loved and honored are under attack from the most unlikely of sources. Book publishers, municipal governments and others seem hell-bent on library destruction, while many wonder if libraries are even relevant at all in the digital age. But – if the library disappears, who will really defend your right to confidentially access free information? Business? The megaminds of the Interwebs? Think again, compadre. Libraries - and librarians - care about your rights. Come to learn what the library offers you, what's really at risk, and how the library is more relevant today than ever.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Two Decades of Trajan in Movie Posters

    by Yves Peters

    Soon after its appearance on the font market more than 20 years ago, the Adobe Original Trajan was embraced by Hollywood. Now it seems to grace more movie posters than any other typeface. Its stately and classic character shapes made it the go-to choice for Oscar material. Yet in recent years the popular font has apparently fallen from grace, and a pretender to the throne is vying to take its place.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 12AB, Austin Convention Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Catch Me If You Can: Frank Abagnale 10 Years Later

    by Frank Abagnale

    Frank Abagnale’s rare expertise began more than 40 years ago when he was known as one of the world's most famous confidence men. Between the ages of 16 and 21, he successfully posed as an airline pilot, an attorney, a college professor and a pediatrician, in addition to cashing $2.5 million in fraudulent checks in every state and 26 foreign countries. Apprehended by the French police when he was 21 years old, he served time in the French, Swedish and U. S. prison systems. After five years he was released on the condition that he would help the federal government, without remuneration, by teaching and assisting federal law enforcement agencies. Frank has now been associated with the FBI for over 35 years. More than 14,000 financial institutions, corporations and law enforcement agencies use his fraud prevention programs.

    Frank’s exploits were depicted in the movie Catch Me If You Can, based on Frank’s best-selling book. In this session, he’ll describe his life, both during the time covered in his well known story, as well as covering what he’s up to these days.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom EF, Austin Convention Center

  • CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    by Andy Hume

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It's difficult to document patterns, and it's difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

  • Does Your Product Have a Plot?

    by David Womack

    What makes an experience—any experience—compelling? A well–told story transcends any particular medium and this presentation will focus on principles of narrative—such as plot, setting, and point–of–view—as they apply to designing digital products, websites, social media, and apps.

    By the end of the presentation, you will have a solid understanding of the principles of creating compelling stories and will be able to apply narrative techniques to the processes of creating and analyzing interactions. We’ll talk about why some digital experiences take off while others fizzle, how to define systems without using site maps, and innovative uses for user journeys.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom BC, Austin Convention Center

  • Read/Write Library: Mapping a City Through Media

    by Nell Taylor

    Read/Write Library is a replicable project that uses local media to examine a region’s creative, political and intellectual interdependencies, creating a visible network of primary sources. We hope to make it available as an open source technical and theoretical template for other cities, borrowing models from library science, urban planning and social networks. Non-professional content receives more respect than in any previous era. By developing contextual and social features within a catalog, we can direct this sentiment at media that wasn’t valued in the cultural climate of its day. Using relative tags and non-hierarchical subject and keyword combinations helps hyperlocal or alternative perspectives compete in search engines alongside dominant historical records and fill in massive blindspots, and each entry is mapped and treated as a social object where users can share stories of the forgotten, marginalized or even still-active communities connected to these publications.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Room 6AB, Austin Convention Center

  • The Secret Lives of Links

    by Jared Spool

    Links are the molecular bonds of our web sites, holding all the pages together. They are the essence of a web site.  Yet, what do we really know about them? If you create great links, your users easily find everything they need on your site. If you do a poor job, your users will find your site impossible or frustrating. We never discuss what truly makes a good link good. Until now. Jared will show you the latest thinking behind the art and science of making great links. Join him for this entertaining and amusing look at the secret lives of our site's links.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Ballroom D, Austin Convention Center

Schedule incomplete?

Add a new session

Filter by Day

Filter by Session type

Filter by coverage

Filter by Topic

Filter by Venue

Filter by Space