Sessions at SXSW Interactive 2012 about Social Media in AT&T Conference Center

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Saturday 10th March 2012

  • Social Media Cures Cancer and Speaks for Survivors

    by Doug Ulman

    In 1997, the Lance Armstrong Foundation was created by the cancer survivor and champion cyclist to serve people affected by cancer. Now known publicly by its powerful brand – LIVESTRONG – the organization is a leader in the global movement on behalf of 28 million people around the world living with cancer.

    LIVESTRONG's CEO, Doug Ulman, is one of the most followed CEO's on Twitter with more than 1 million followers. Evolving side-by-side with social media, a large part of the success and following of LIVESTRONG comes from the nonprofit’s utilization of online networking over the years. In 2009 at the BlogWorld Conference the hashtag #BeatCancer was used to set a Guinness World Record with over 209,000 mentions in 24-hours.

    Cancer is the world’s number one killer globally. Ulman and LIVESTRONG continue to utilize channels of communication that will help spread the LIVESTRONG message on a worldwide scale. Proving itself a useful weapon, viral is key in the fight against the disease.

    This Future of Health Track is sponsored by Aetna.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Classroom 204, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Social Media and Politics Meet Up

    by David Armistead

    Get together with other social media and politics experts for an hour of brainstorming, idea-buidling, networking, friend-making and career-enhancement. Or, attend this Meet Up to learn more about this segment of the industry -- or if you are looking to hire a social media and politics expert for your campaign.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 10th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

Sunday 11th March 2012

  • Friending Pharma: Patients, Industry & New Media

    by Michele Polz, Alicia Staley, Brian Reid, Allison Blass and Kerri Sparling

    As more and more patients begin using social media as an information source and a support network, it's inevitable that they'll begin to interact with representatives of pharmaceutical companies looking to use new technologies to inform and educate. While consumer-industry interactions are not new -- Comcast crawls Twitter for those in need of tech support, and Gatorade sends electronic high-fives to high school athletes -- links between drug companies and those they serve are more fraught, with some patients celebrating dialogue and others warning that such relationships are intrinsically inappropriate. This panel -- including patients, advocates and industry -- will explore the ground rules of "friending" big pharma and the ground rules that biopharma firms must play by to ensure patients aren't taken advantage of.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Classroom 204, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Socializing the Presidency: Digital Politics 2012

    by Craig Newmark, Maria Teresa Kumar, Christina Bellantoni, Heather Smith and Mary Katharine Ham

    What are the trends in social and digital media that will help shape the 2012 presidential election? What can we learn from grassroots election efforts like Rock the Vote, now in its 20th year, contrasted with the very short history and transformational social media tactics used in recent presidential politics? Is it a natural evolution of activism, is it disruptive? If so - how? Join PBS NewsHour moderator Christina Bellantoni and panelists Mary Katharine Ham (radio host/political commentator); Maria Teresa Kumar (founding executive director, Voto Latino); Craig Newmark (founder craigslist and craigconnects); Heather Smith (president, Rock the Vote); and others to be announced, for a wide-ranging, idea-generating, big-picture discussion of trends past, present and future on how the presidential election may be shaped and transformed by social media services such as Twitter and Facebook to new location based and mobile technologies.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon B, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • How STDs Can Be Good for Your Health

    by Anmol Madan, David Hale, Deven McGraw, Mark Dredze and Emily Hackel

    We’ll let you in on a secret: Socially Transmitted Data (STDs) are good for your health.

    Updating Twitter, searching for information on Google, texting your friends, and carrying your mobile phone – these activities may hold the key to preventing your next cold or knowing when flu will be keeping the kids at home so you can get them Echinacea and call the sitter in time.

    In this panel, we’ll discuss how the data you leave in your wake, every day, holds within it vast opportunity to predict and even improve personal and public health; and we’ll delve into some of the latest research and tools that are helping uncover what’s possible. Do you want to know when the next bug will be wafting through town? Is your partner depressed but not aware what’s wrong? Your twitter feed, mobile location traces, search queries, subway travel patterns and even buying behavior may hold the answer.

    The common denominator: These non-traditional passive data offer tremendous scale that simply doesn't exist with any other physiological health sensor. They give us clues about our personal and collective health behavior, and help health care professionals and health organizations better serve the public.

    It is important to note, that while some are excited by these prospects, others cry “big brother”. So we’ll discuss privacy implications too.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Classroom 204, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • But Hasn't Politics Always Been Social?

    by Adam Conner and Katie Harbath

    Everyone is talking about how "social media" is changing politics and elections. But hasn't politics always been social? Townhalls, rallies, knocking on doors, talking to friends and the act of asking for a vote has always been a social experience. But now, thanks to new technology, we can see what social means for politics in the U.S. and around the world. Join Facebook's political outreach gurus, Adam Conner (D) and Katie Harbath (R), as these bipartisan campaign veterans explain why “social” isn’t a new phenomenon but the core of American democracy and how 2012 can become year of "the social campaign."

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon B, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • How to Run a Social Site and Not Get Users Killed

    by Sam Gregory, Jillian York, Danny O'Brien and Ahmed Shihab-Eldin

    Facebook helped foment an uprising. Twitter kept the world rapt as revolution unfolded. But for all of their benefits, the use of social networks often puts activists--in Egypt, Syria, China, or even the United States--at great risk. Your privacy policy and terms of use, as well as how you enforce them, could mean life or death for an activist (or an ordinary user) using your site. What can you, the social media company, do to help keep your users safe?

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Fulbright: How the 1st Social Network Adapts to SM

    by Doug Mitchell, Katie Day Good, Vijay Renganathan and Megan Neff

    Sixty years before Zuckerberg, Senator J. William Fulbright had a revolutionary idea: connect people around the world to share ideas. Born out of WWII, his vision was “public diplomacy”: exchange regular citizens of various countries to interact, share knowledge, become friends, and stay connected for life.

    In the social media era, are international exchange programs like Fulbright still relevant for public diplomacy? Can social networks create the same intercultural experiences online, serving more people at lower cost? Early Fulbrighters traveled on ships and stayed in touch by letter; now they fly and friend on Facebook. Have these programs outlived their usefulness when we can instantly Skype with anyone anywhere?

    The exploding number of Fulbright applications since 2001 says “no”. This panel will explore why, discussing the challenges and opportunities public diplomacy programs face in the digital age, and how participants are putting the internet at the center of their projects.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Sunday 11th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

Monday 12th March 2012

  • Voting’s Viral: Voters, Election Officials & Social

    by Dean Logan, Dana Chisnell, Jared Marcotte, Jeannie Layson and Lee Rainie

    How do you get reliable information about elections? Many voters get their information about who is running for election and what the issues are from friends and family. Increasingly, those friends and family are online, getting their information from social media sources and passing it on. What’s the conversation between voters and election officials? What’s the potential for increasing civic engagement through social media? This panel will discuss breakthroughs and cautions, experiences and pointers. What you learn about who is using what and why will surprise you.

    At 9:30am to 10:30am, Monday 12th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • How Mexico’s Drug Traffickers Harness Social Media

    by Shauna Dillavou

    Mexico’s Drug Trafficking Organizations (DTOs) use various types of social media to influence and manipulate public opinion. At the most basic level, DTOs regularly post videos to Youtube of interrogations, beheadings and dismemberments of rival gang members, to intimidate other groups and the public. Myspace is another soft influence tool; profiles abound that glorify the narco-life, including photos of fast cars, blinged-out weapons, and scantily-clad women. Narco-ballads, increasingly banned on Mexican airwaves, are also available on Myspace. Blog del Narco and parrot sites provide direct interaction between DTOs and the public. These sites anonymously post images of DTO communications hung on freeway overpasses or pinned to victims’ bodies, delivering threats to rival gangs, politicians, and police, and seeking the public’s favor. Citizens once used Twitter to warn of violence along routes to work and school. Now, DTOs pose as concerned citizens and to encourage the online citizen watch to help them locate rival gangs and law enforcement. DTOs use smart-phone applications to communicate, and to navigate the border region without law enforcement detection.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon E, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • How Social Media Imperils Political Parties

    by Joe Trippi, Matt Bai, Mark McKinnon, Marci Harris and Nathan Daschle

    Most things in our lives are now custom fit. If we want coffee, we can order it 50 ways. If we want to watch a movie, we can choose between Netflix, iTunes, On Demand, etc. If we need a restaurant review, we have OpenTable, Yelp, etc. However, for one of the most important aspects of our life, politics, we still have only two "meat or fish" options. We are also at a point where people are more disaffected than ever by political parties. A Pew post-election poll in 2010 found for the first time in modern American history, Independents outnumbered Democrats and Republicans in terms of party affiliation. This need for tailoring our lives has now met our distaste for political institutions. While political parties will always be a piece of American politics, their relevance is being severely diminished by the growth of social media. The biggest political movements in the last year (Wisconsin, the Arab Spring, the Tea Party movement) all came together OUTSIDE of political institutions, not from within (and largely due to social media). This panel will discuss this trend.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

  • Europe Is Different, so Adapt Your Strategy!

    by Bastian Scherbeck

    Nowadays, everyone seems to be focused on China as the worlds 'next' market. However, the European Union has a larger combined economy than the US, with the largest markets within it being Germany, France, the UK and Italy. With European social media use dominated by Facebook, you might assume that the an identical platform allows for easy application of US-focused social media marketing approaches to the countries of the EU.

    It couldn't be further from the truth - From tonality, to the willingness to share, to the topics of data security and privacy: In terms of being social online, Europe is different from the US. And Europe is different from Europe. Therefore: adapt your measures! If you want to successfully market your brand and products on a pan-European level – this is the session you need to attend!

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Deploying Social Media to Share the Army Story

    by Kayley Nammari, Levi Peffer, Benjamin Grimes and Greg Swan

    As one of the largest employers in the country and with a workforce charged with national security, one would think the military wouldn’t take any risks when it comes to communication. However, the U.S. Army is leading the industry in transparency and authenticity in the social media space across social networks, building unfiltered Soldier blogs, interactive web experiences, and designing award-winning blogger outreach campaigns (e.g., throwing Twitter followers out of airplanes). Come hear from those in the trenches about how these programs were established, how Soldiers access social media when deployed, and how the Army has succeeded despite strict security, limited staff and stringent ROI. The panel features Soldier panelists from diverse Army backgrounds who are active in Army's social media programs.

    At 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • Africa, Tech & Women: The New Faces of Development

    by Isis Nyong'o, Liz Ngonzi, Ebele Okobi, Deborah Ensor and TMS Ruge

    This panel provides a rare glimpse into the multitude of ways African women are applying technology to advance Africa’s development. The panel aims to dispel the myths about African women as breeders and victims -- incapable of participating in their own continent’s development, by: (1) showcasing contributions they are making in the technology field – through entrepreneurship, philanthropy, and community leadership; and (2) providing insights into how they are using technology to raise awareness about, mobilize campaigns against and address human rights violations.

    The panel will specifically explore how African women are using technology to make an impact through:
    - Digital advocacy to protect people’s rights
    - Social media to help grassroots organizations engage new supporters worldwide
    - Mobile advertising to enable small businesses to access new markets
    - Internet connectivity to integrate the often unheard community voices into the global conversation on development

    Throughout the discussion, panelists will provide anecdotes on how the resulting increased access to information is altering the role of women in African society.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Salon D, AT&T Conference Center

  • Digital and Social Learning: Transforming Education

    by Dr William J Ward

    Digital and social learning has changed dynamics in the classroom and new opportunities for engagement and collaboration arise daily. Keeping up with change and innovation requires continuous hands-on experimentation. Yet, Higher ed accreditation, tenure (teacher unions), and the academic journal publication system are not equipped for innovation. A lack of understanding and training and no incentive to change the status quo make the cultural shift needed a daunting task. More than a few individuals and schools are moving forward while others are so entrenched in the current system that they are fortifying positions against Social Media. How can we shift the culture of education to harness digital & social learning to embrace change & innovation and transform education.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Monday 12th March

    In Classroom 203, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

Tuesday 13th March 2012

  • How the White House is Mobilizing Social Media

    by Kori Schulman

    From his first day in office, President Obama put a priority on an open and engaging government. From Hangouts to hashtags, the White House is utilizing social media to interact with Americans everyday on the issues that they care about the most. As the first Administration in history to have a presence on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and elsewhere online, the White House’s social media strategy is focused on creating opportunities for meaningful engagement. This session will highlight the #40dollars campaign surrounding the payroll tax cut extension, White House Hangouts and more. Kori Schulman, Deputy Director of Online Outreach at the White House, will discuss how the Administration is breaking new ground to engage with citizens in the digital age and what’s next.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon E, AT&T Conference Center

  • Social Media Boundaries: Personal/Personnel Policy

    by Vanessa Rhinesmith, Debra Askanase, Jess Main and Amy Sample Ward

    As our networks expand, our profiles get more public, and our work requires a human face, where do we draw the line between personal and professional identities online? How do we maintain those boundaries for our community members? How do we respond to attacks, opportunities, and over-shares online? When does over-sharing hurt the community? When should you share your own personal stories as a manager, or personally reach out to community members?

    Growing and cultivating an active community also requires that the community manager walk the fine line of personal and professional sharing. Every community manager wonders when and how to professionally cultivate leaders and members to create a thriving community while still being personal. On the reverse side, sometimes community members share too much, which can hurt the health of the community.

    This panel will address these questions and more from experience in nonprofit and public media sectors.

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

  • 2012: Social Media’s New Role in Politics

    by Khris Loux, Ben Parr, Vishal Sankhla and Mark Blumenthal

    Social media has earned a prominent seat at the table with the large media companies of the world and has birthed an entirely new way to cover the world of politics. As we approach the electoral year, political chatter will continue to snowball and generate enormous heaps of data. Data can drastically impact how we determine the importance of a given story, the ways that we gauge public opinion and eventually may even revolutionize the way we cast our votes. This panel will discuss the many ways that the web is providing entirely new tools and resources to track and cover the world of politics and discuss the unique perspective social media data paints for the voice of a bolder and broader demographic. This panel will feature experts in political news, new media, data crunching and the real-time web debating the future of political coverage and the impact of new social technologies on political news and research.

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon A, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip

  • How Social Media Drives a Student’s Success

    by Gary Natriello, Jennifer Openshaw and Jared Carney

    School budget cuts, high unemployment (over 20% for youth), and a global economy – No wonder parents are concerned about their child’s success and 70% of teens say they want more guidance. What can you do? In this exciting and engaging panel, kicked-off with an opening by America’s best-known Administrator – Iqbal Theba who plays “Prinicipal Figgins” in the hit TV show, Glee – and led by Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal columnist Jennifer Openshaw (Oprah, CNN), you'll learn how technology and social media can drive your child’s success and where it can’t.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Classroom 203, AT&T Conference Center

  • Senate Committees Push Boundaries on Social Media

    by Conor Kenny and Steven Polunsky

    The bulk of social media and Web 2.0 use in Congress and state legislatures has until now largely been composed of personal tweets and posts by legislators and staff, pushing communications out without engaging in true conversations with constituents. Innovation in this area has lagged the private sector.One Texas Senate committee is changing that. Charged by Chairman John Carona to “push the envelope so hard it’s no longer stationery,” the Business and Commerce Committee is moving out with social media. They began by examining the legislative process and identifying each point where lobbyists and advocates have special access to information or legislators, then looked for technologies that would level the playing field, open the process to the public, or help generate consensus. As a testbed, the committee is currently tackling a tough issue –payday lending – and they’ll tell you what they’re doing, what’s worked and where they think Gov2.0 is going.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Tuesday 13th March

    In Salon B, AT&T Conference Center

    Coverage audio clip