Sessions at WebVisions Portland 2012 on Thursday 17th May

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  • Welcome Message

    At 9:00am to 9:15am, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

  • Correspondent from the Future

    by Baratunde Thurston

    In this technology and future-oriented talk, Baratunde, host of Popular Science's Future Of on Science Channel, goes behind the scenes of his television show as well as his digital strategy work at The Onion and other companies to give a deeper analysis of the issues raised in his exploration of the future.

    From self-driving cars to creepy Japanese robots to a real, functioning orgasmatron, Baratunde will share anecdotes, images and a thoughtful, provocative and humorous analysis of what the future might hold.

    At 9:15am to 10:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage video

  • Crowdsource This! A New, Community-based Model for Film Funding, Promotion and Distribution

    by Gorman Bechard, Beth Harrington, Arnold Pander and Jacob James Pander

    From production to distribution, the film industry is experiencing tremendous change that is tearing apart new business models as soon as they appear to be defined. The disruptive nature of the business can be scary, challenging and daunting, but is also offering huge opportunities for filmmakers.

    Join a panel of film experts that includes Grammy-nominated documentary filmmaker Beth Harrington, the acclaimed Pander Brothers duo and Indie filmmaker Gorman Bechard for an exploration of trends, tools and new ideas for film.

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In D135, Oregon Convention Center

  • Embracing the Anywhere, Everywhere Web

    by Tim Kadlec

    New devices and platforms emerge daily. Browsers iterate at a remarkable pace. We don't know for certain what device our users will be using or where they'll be using them from. Faced with this volatile and uncertain landscape, we can either struggle for control or we can embrace the inherent flexibility of the web.

    This session will look at how this affects our approach to building experiences for the web. We'll look at some of the things we can do now to make our designs and content more adaptable to the many devices and platforms finding their way to the market. We'll also discuss where our current tools and processes fall short, and what they need to evolve into.

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In D137/138, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • How Not to Be a JavaScript Hack

    by Phillip Kerman

    The good news is browsers have seen phenomenal performance gains in their ability to render JavaScript. But the demand for sophisticated applications has also grown. Match this with the fact mobile devices are inherently slow and you will quickly see why streamlined code is important. Not only do developers need to squeeze every drop of JavaScript performance possible, but more importantly, they need to avoid pitfalls that can cause applications to come to a screeching halt and crash.

    This session covers:

    • basics of JavaScript (like avoiding variable collision and memory leaks);
    • best practices for good performance (including simple caching, closures vs. global functions, as well * as comparison of different object-oriented patterns); and,
    • when to use CSS transitions instead of JavaScript

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In D139/140, Oregon Convention Center

  • How to Hire a Web Professional

    by Aaron Gustafson

    Hiring someone to build or work on your website is extremely tough, especially if you don’t grok code (or even recognize “grok” as a word). How can you tell a solid web professional from a mediocre or bad one when you don’t know a whole lot about what they do?

    Unfortunately, the decision of who works on your website can have a profound impact on your business’ success on the web.

    In this session, Aaron Gustafson—a veteran web professional and serial entrepreneur— will walk you through 10 simple questions to ask of anyone interested in working on your website. He'll also explain why each question is important and how to gauge the quality of the responses you get. Along the way, he’ll cover a variety of topics, including: accessibility, mobile, search-friendliness, and the process of building a website.

    Attendees may not walk away with the ability to wax philosophically on finer points of web geekdom, but they will leave this session with the ability to distinguish a true web professional from a wannabe. If you are a web professional, it may not be a bad idea to check out this session; that way you know what questions you are likely to be asked.

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In D136, Oregon Convention Center

  • Trust Me, I'm a Designer

    by Jason CranfordTeague

    A recent study by Demos (Demos.co.uk) called Truth, Lies and the Internet found that a third of teens polled in the UK believe any information they find on line is true without qualification. Even more staggering is that a 15% of that group admit to making their decision about the truthfulness of the content of a Web page based on appearance alone.
    Design serves one primary purpose: to gain the trust of its intended audience. Within the first second of viewing a design — before even reading a single word — we have already determined our opinion about the quality and likely trustworthiness of what we are looking at. Once that basic line of trust is established, it is only then that design can clearly work to help turn data into knowledge and knowledge into understanding.

    In this session, Jason will present the 9 principles of trust for design, and look at how you can use them to help clients understand often obscure design decisions.

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In D133, Oregon Convention Center

  • Why We Fail

    by Victor Lombardi

    Just as pilots and doctors improve by studying morbid-but-fascinating crash reports and postmortems, user experience designers can improve by learning how products failed in the marketplace when the determining factor was experience design. As opposed to proselytizing a particular approach to design, these case studies from Victor's forthcoming book Why We Fail will illustrate what teams actually built, how the products failed, and how we can learn from that experience.

    From the growing prominence of Internet startups to the Failcon conference there is a growing acceptance of failure in the technology community. After acceptance the next step is action: using failure to improve our work. Victor will highlight examples of companies who successfully act on failure at the personal, process, and cultural levels.

    In his talk, Victor will explore...

    • the various types of customer experience failure
    • stories that illustrate how designs fail customers
    • how successful companies use failure to create better designs

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

  • Panel: New Ideas on the Future of Healthcare

    by Elizabeth Bacon, Peter Jones, William Hersh, MD and Nate DiNiro

    At 11:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D135, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Platformication

    by George Ross

    It is just not about the web anymore. If you have content users now expect to be able to slice it, dice it and consume it how and when it best fits their needs.

    Since most of us are not Netflix, Twitter or Facebook how do you serve up API, mobile and web experiences without breaking the bank or killing your development team?

    Using a real project (SongSelect) we will look at how a scrappy 4 person team built a web platform that now serves up an API consumed by a number of third party software vendors, and mobile web experience and a brand new web presence that is available globally and gets over 6 million page views a month.

    In the session we will talk about how to address issues of brand, user experience the development that come up and how you can begin to transcend the confines of your current website and come to promised land of Platformication.

    At 11:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 17th May

  • Re-imaging the World through Social Innovation and Social Networks

    by Miquel Guri and Alessandro Madeddu

    If we introduce a single bacterium to a test tube of food it will divide in one minute. In 2 minutes there will be four, in 3 mins 8 and in 5 mins 32. If we say the tube will be full in 60 mins, and the food will be all gone - when will it be half full? Answer 59 mins. How many bacteria will there be at 61 mins? Answer - none alive.

    If you ask scientists who understand this planet what minute we are in with regards to this example they will say; ‘the 59th minute’. Social and creative innovation can be used to stop the clock right now. We cannot say the world of the future will be better for our children because we do not know it will even be there.

    The internet and social networks are key tools in making this change possible. When will you wake up and take part?

    At 11:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D137/138, Oregon Convention Center

  • The Web's Third Decade

    by Faruk Ateş

    Our medium has entered its third decade of existence, and is ready for some growing up. Our definitions and understanding of the web are rapidly getting out of date, as, too, are our practices for building on it. It is time to re-evaluate where things are and, more importantly, where they are going.

    Faruk Ateş will teach tools and techniques for a more modern view on the web, the world’s greatest platform for content delivery as well as function. Learn how the past is improperly preparing us for the present and the future, negatively affecting our work—and what you can do to free yourself from these information shackles.

    At 11:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

  • UX for Aliens

    by Thea Kinyon Boodhoo

    A vital lesson for all web professionals is that “you are not your user”. With this in mind, we constantly observe differences in perception, habits, abilities and background knowledge between us and our audience. Those differences usually live on a scale from “designing for myself” to “designing for the sensory impaired” - but what lies on the true extremes of that scale?

    How do you design for someone who sees the world in sonar? What about in smell? How would you make something a plant could use?

    And, if we ever send a probe to a habitable world, how can we make sure that any real aliens who find it know what to do with it?

    At 11:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D139/140, Oregon Convention Center

  • When Google Maps Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

    by Wm Leler

    Google Maps has long been the choice for embedding maps on your website, or building map mashups. But Google's recent announcement that they will start charging for maps (or including ads on maps) has people looking at other options. As an added bonus, many of the alternative solutions have significant advantages over Google Maps.

    If you are a website owner with an embedded simple map, this talk will show you how you can dump Google Maps and switch over to other solutions in minutes (both free and paid). If you are a web designer, you'll see how you can customize maps so they will look the way you want them to look, not the way Google wants them to look. If you are a programmer building map-based webapps, you'll see how open source mapping APIs like Leaflet and Modest Maps make it faster and easier to build map mashups and have them work the way you want.

    And if you just like cool maps, you'll see some new things that are possible with the next generation of map apps using HTML5 and CSS3.

    At 11:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D133, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Applying Behavior Design

    by Chris Risdon

    More and more products and services are designed around motivating users and incentivizing change. Products and services in finance, health and the environment, among other areas, are increasingly designed around influencing behavior. Some are doing this better than others. There are useful academic models and patterns for applying persuasion techniques. However, these techniques tend to stand alone, separate from our proven methods and processes for designing for good user experiences.

    This session will illustrate how academically derived techniques and persuasive design patterns are integrated in digital products and services. While understanding how powerful behavior design can influence people to be better, we will also discuss and illustrate tactically how we design these products and services so that they serve the interest of customers, as well as meet business needs.

    As designers, the choices we make invariably influence users, and now we are harnessing what we know about designing around behavior to produce products and services that have a positive social impact on people's lives. It's time to move beyond just the concepts and theories and understand how to apply behavior design tactics responsibly.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D136, Oregon Convention Center

  • CSS3 OpenType: The New Web Typography Frontier

    by Thomas Phinney

    Web typography is changing dramatically thanks to browser support for @font-face and server-based fonts. Web designers now have thousands of font choices where they once had just a dozen. But beyond @font-face, CSS 3 introduces myriad new OpenType typographic controls, bringing a level of typographic precision to web design previously seen only in print.

    Covered in this presentation:

    • how @font-face server-based web fonts work, and what options they replace
    • choices for enabling @font-face, from self-hosting to web font services
    • both font-independent and OpenType features, and how to tell which web fonts support which OpenType features.
    • see these features in action on web pages, from workhorse everyday typography to the surprising and bizarre, via fonts created by Phinney and friends
    • other CSS 3 typographic features such as kerning and hyphenation
    • state and near future of advanced typography support in browsers
    • “correct” typographic use of all these new features

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D137/138, Oregon Convention Center

  • Data Driven Mobile Apps

    by Justin Garrity

    Users behave differently on mobile apps than they do on websites. If you apply the same thinking to your mobile app as what you have learned from your website analytics, you may lose out on great opportunities to fine tune your app and to create loyal fans.

    Justin Garrity has a background in user experience design and analytics. By looking across different data sources like usage analytics, app store analytics, and ad analytics, Justin will show you how you can piece together a comprehensive picture of what mobile users do, what they want, and how you could improve your apps.

    If you have apps that are live now or you are thinking about creating an app, this session is for you.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D133, Oregon Convention Center

  • Execution is Everything

    by Peter Merholz, John Bragg, Gino Zahnd and Ryan Freitas

    The gap between how design firms operate and how products actually get built is wider than ever. Join this panel of UX and development vets in a conversation + Q&A around what the world looks like when everyone on your team stops consulting and starts building. Developers: learn how to think (and hire) through a UX lens. Designers: learn how to work best with the types of people who can make your ideas actually come to life.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D135, Oregon Convention Center

  • Get Lucky: The Business of Planned Serendipity

    by Thor Muller

    As the pace of change accelerates around our businesses, and the sheer volume of information explodes, we're under incredible pressure to connect just in time with the people and ideas we need to make breakthrough progress. We can no longer research, plan or process our way to success.

    The answer is planned serendipity, the practice of making unexpected discoveries. By definition, we don't know when serendipity will strike, but we can foster the conditions for it to occur early and often in and around our organizations.

    This talk outlines the eight elements of planned serendipity for businesses.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

  • The 5 Dirty Secrets of Demographics

    by Eric Holtzclaw

    Today's consumers are demanding more from companies. Customers expect products, services, information and online experiences that are timely and catered to their specific needs and desires. Traditionally, companies develop and market products and services based on market segmentation and demographics, assuming that the features, functionalities and messaging will meet the needs of all of the customers in that demographic – a "one size fits all" mentality.
    One major problem with traditional demographic data is this: in today’s many-to-many world, users group themselves, especially online, largely based on values, interests and aspirations – not by sex, race and age. In this scenario, companies must understand their users’ behaviors and motivators – the why’s behind their actions. Otherwise, the “one size fits all” outlook can sabotage the user experience online and off.

    The Dirty Little Secrets of Demographics are adages; concepts that are familiar to us all. Eric V. Holtzclaw of User Insight will reveal how these “truths” based off of demographics alone can threaten a good user experience. Eric will utilize real-world examples from research conducted by User Insight over the last 10 years.

    At 1:30pm to 2:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D139/140, Oregon Convention Center

  • A Platform for Building RIAs using Domain Specific Languages

    by John Brinnand

    As web applications evolve and the use of widget toolkits proliferate, the problems of designing and building scalable front ends has become more and more involved. Web and UI developers spend significant amounts of time authoring and maintaining many thousands of lines of HTML and JS code embedded in one or more web pages. This code is a heady cocktail containing - among other things - the layout of a page, images and CSS, embedded content as well as JS functions, widgets and events. This complex blend of scaffolding, business logic and embedded content can be a challenge (some might say a nightmare), to develop, debug and evolve - even in the best of times. In fact most complex web applications - once built - are fairly immutable and change averse.

    The approach being proposed in this session is a departure from this model. It creates a layer above the DOM using the native capabilities of the Browser - including Javascript and JSON - to model and generate web applications and pages. This layer is bounded on all sides by the modules that interact with the user and manage the domain model as well as the services which interact with the application server to provide storage, B-to-B services and business logic. Additionally the domain model treats both layout and content as first class citizens, separate but equal. This separation of display and data is similar, in principle, to the MDV approach being proposed by Google: http://code.google.com/p/mdv.

    This declarative approach and layered architecture is based - at its core - on the principles and practices of Domain Driven Design which Eric Evans, Martin Fowler and Neal Ford et al, are promoting. This approach enables developers and designers to author / generate complex layouts in a matter of minutes. These layouts can then be customized to include themes, business logic and data which can be added to, and removed from, any panel in the layout. These complex layouts can be saved, loaded and shared on demand. They can also be continuously re-factored until they are ready for release.

    Another feature of the platform is it's service and event model. Based on SOA this plug-able architecture allows services to be added, as needed, into the application. These services communicate with each other as well as their server side counterparts to provide the business logic and rich functionality required for a business application.

    This presentation will demonstrate the RIA (Rich Internet Application) platform using its UI and service backend, including an example of a B-to-B interaction with Etsy - an ecommerce application. The takeaways from this presentation are:

    * A LayeredArchitecture for the Front End including:
    Handlers, Modelers, Builders,
    Managers, Services, Events;
    * Continuous Refactoring using DSLs;
    * A Domain Model for a Web Page / Layout;
    * JSON as an internal DSL;
    * A JS programming model - based on Douglas Crockfords "Javascript the Good Parts",
    * JS Modules and Asynchronous Module Definition - benefits and consequences.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D133, Oregon Convention Center

  • Analytics Innovation to Maximise ROI

    by Morgan Vawter

    Web analytics is a fast changing game. Now more than ever it's critical to dig into your data to expose customer behavior as well as monitoring your revenue funnel to determine your website’s true ROI. This data allows you to optimize your website, future marketing campaigns, maximize efficiency, and drive sales.

    Many recent advances have been made in analytics technology, how can you use these new technologies to maximize revenue for your business?

    In what promises to be an eye opening presentation, Morgan Vawter will review cutting edge new analytics technology and innovations in existing analytics software, including Google Analytics. Some of the key technologies covered include real-time, mobile, connecting offline and online analytics, behavioral targeting/personalization, attribution modeling, tracking containers, user fingerprinting, panel analytics and other cutting edge strategies and technologies.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D139/140, Oregon Convention Center

  • Discussing Design: The Art of Critique

    by Aaron Irizarry and Adam Connor

    In this presentation we’ll discuss the importance of critique and a language for discussing design. It’s easy to complain about the way things are and theorize on the way things should be. Progress comes from understanding why something is the way it is and then examining how it meets or does not meet the desired goals. This is critique.

    Critique is not about describing how bad something is, or proposing the ultimate solution. Critique is a dialogue, a conversation that takes place to better understand how we got to where we are, how close we are to getting where we want to go and what we have left to do to get there.

    The contents of this presentation will focus on:

    • understanding critique
    • best practices for incorporating critiques into a design practice
    • identifying common challenges to critique and ways to improve our ability to deliver, collect and receive critique

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D137/138, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Hulk Smash the Web! How the Web and Digital Technology are Reshaping Visual Effects

    by Jeff White

    Computer graphics in visual effects is a relatively young industry in relation to film making, although it is an ever changing industry. In recent years, digital technology and the web have brought significant changes into all aspects of film production.

    Jeff will detail how digital capture drove the creation of the Hulk, Ironman and a virtual New York City for Marvel's the Avengers. He'll cover the steps ILM took to create the newest Hulk including working with Mark Ruffalo to bring his likeness and performance into a CG character.

    In addition, he'll talk about the impact of the web at each step of visual effects production and how it's rapidly changing the way visual effects work is done.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

  • The Simple Web. Saying Hello to the Late Majority Internet

    by Brad Cohen

    Applying Internet adoption in the US to Everett Roger's Diffusion of Innovation theory we could easily argue that we have entered the late majority phase of internet adoption. 51% of Americans over 12 years old are on Facebook. Over 70% of Americans are online. And the fast and furious pace of the web's impact on our communication patterns and interpersonal relationships is only gaining momentum.

    In this session Brad will lead us through the realities of the internet of the late majority, and how this new reality may force us to adjust our assumptions about what the web is, and how we use it.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D135, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck

  • Why Business Must be Human

    by Peter Merholz

    Through the 19th and 20th centuries, the industrial and information ages, businesses became increasingly mechanistic, and the people working in them were seen as cogs executing tasks. With the 21st century we’re moving from information to relationships, products to services, consumption to meaning. Concepts like design thinking, innovation, and customer experience are not goals in and of themselves, but indicators of a deeper, more fundamental shift: in this connected age, business must re-connect with those things that make us human.

    In this presentation, Peter will explain the remarkable opportunities for businesses that engage humanism, and explain the steps your organization must take in order to embrace this new model.

    At 2:30pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D136, Oregon Convention Center

  • Building Mobile Applications with Web Standards

    by Kevin Hoyt

    If you are building for iOS, the you use Objective C and Xcode. If you are building for Android, then you might use Java and Eclipse. And if you are building for BlackBerry, you will find yet a different Java. But all these devices have a modern browser capable of leveraging many of the emerging web standards. So why not use that browser to build applications that you can deploy in the various application stores? Welcome to PhoneGap.

    In this session, join Adobe Evangelist, Kevin Hoyt on a tour of how to get started building mobile applications with web standards using PhoneGap. We will start by setting up the workflows for both iOS and Android. From there we will build and deploy our first application to each. After that it is off to the races with native device API integration including accelerometer, compass, audio recording, camera and photo gallery access, and more.

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D133, Oregon Convention Center

  • Designing Care Services for Health Seeking

    by Peter Jones

    As in all sectors affected by technology, healthcare and clinical practices are headed for disruption in the near future. Every disrupting innovation will have an associated web portal - National-level deployments of e-health records (EMRs), inexpensive access to individual genomic interpretation, individualized treatment based on genetics, and ambient sensors to enable better disease management. Don’t forget, healthcare system finance and business models will also be disrupted, not because of the web, but aided and abetted by the economics of online management. How will these future outcomes affect us as individuals and what are the opportunities for web services innovation?

    Of course there are many opportunities. But there is one service channel that we all are touched by, which may seem sheltered from disruptions. When we need direct care, the one service we cannot live without is clinical care from our physicians. Yet we continue to speak different languages, in spite of the easy reach of web services for unlimited personal research. As health seekers, we the public use almost any web resource to find pertinent help. Yet doctors and clinicians are professionally constrained to a world of evidence. Their IT future needs design help. For your own safety, you may not want them using most of the EMRs on the market today. How are medical practices changing with the evolution of the web? How can we improve the high tech and high touch relationship between health seekers and their clinical care?

    You will takeaway:

    • Understanding of current problems and opportunities in healthcare as service
    • Learning how service systems are the framework for scalable service design and delivery
    • Learning design principles for service systems in healthcare
    • Knowing where the best opportunities are for future design contribution

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D137/138, Oregon Convention Center

  • It’s a Good Time to Be You

    by Russ Unger

    User Experience Design–have we figured out what this is yet? Or, for that matter, where it is going in the future? What are unicorns, why does everyone want to hire one, everyone claims it impossible to be one, yet still aspire to be one?

    While you may not find yourself with a specific answer, you will be taken on a journey of exploration through challenges, definitions defining yourself, and what it means to fake it. You'll explore a variety of brilliant, different thinkers and what it takes to get to know them and start down the path of becoming one of them (hint: you're already on your way!).

    And finally, you'll be introduced to a new methodology of UX that hearkens from depths of innovation not seen since Miami in the mid-80s.

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In Main, Oregon Convention Center

  • Measures of Success: How to Quantitatively Measure Your User Experience

    by Richard Dalton

    How do you know if the user experience your team is slaving over is succeeding or failing? How can your team use data to make better decisions? Quantitative measures can help answer these questions and can complement more traditional qualitative research methods like usability testing.

    Like many things in life, quantitative measurement relies on good preparation. To effectively measure a user experience it must be divided into discrete pieces that can be measured against their objectives. In this presentation Richard will provide a framework for thinking about measurement along with techniques and tips.

    He will describe in detail how to create a Capability Strategy Sheet that defines the goals and measures of an experience (along with a complete example based on a fictional pet store website). He will also share some common measurement patterns that have emerged from his team’s work.
    To conclude, he will describe some of the cultural and change management challenges involved when an organization uses data to inform design decisions.

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 17th May

    In D136, Oregon Convention Center

    Coverage slide deck