Sessions at Where 2012 in Yerba Buena Salon 9

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Monday 2nd April 2012

  • Location Marketing Boot Camp

    Once again this year at Where Conference, we’re bringing together marketers and technologists for a Location Marketing Boot Camp – happening on Monday, April 2. This full-day intensive will focus on location-based marketing campaigns and the new technologies available to help marketers take advantage of location data and services. You’ll hear tales of marketing successes as well as disasters, with real-life case studies, project postmortems, keynotes, start-up demos, Q&A, and a branding exercise. And this boot camp is not just for marketers – developers, biz dev people, start-ups, and anyone else interested in incorporating location into their marketing strategy will find it useful.

    At 9:00am to 5:55pm, Monday 2nd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Ignite Where 2012, Sponsored by Nokia Location and Commerce

    by harold cooper, Jacqueline Kazil, Jon Bruner, Tadayasu Sasada, Simon Frid, Saul Tannenbaum, Chiu-Ki Chan, Jonathan Wegener, Justin Moore, Gregory Dicum and Will Carter

    If you had five minutes on stage what would you say? What if you only got 20 slides and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Would you pitch a project? Launch a web site? Teach a hack? We’re going to find out at Ignite Where, a fun evening of “speed presentations” given by people like you.

    Happening Monday evening, April 2, this will be a high-energy, fast-paced event, hosted by Program Chair Brady Forrest. If you can’t picture what it would be like, watch some videos at igniteshow.com or check out Scott Berkun’s session, How and Why to Give an Ignite Talk.

    At 7:00pm to 8:30pm, Monday 2nd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

    Coverage video

Tuesday 3rd April 2012

  • Welcome & Announcements

    by brady forrest

    Opening remarks by Brady Forrest, Where Conference program chair.

    At 9:00am to 9:05am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • A Brave New World: Providing Context For What Is Possible And Probable

    by Charlene Li

    Our personal devices provide endless streams of data set in context of who we are, where we are, who we know, and what we do. But what can we realistically expect the future to look like, and how soon will it be before it gets here? The key is to understand what new opportunities are unleashed through the combination of these different contextual data – and overlay what is probably given business model, social, technology, and political constraints. We’ll also look at what this brave new world means in terms of actions you must take today.

    At 9:05am to 9:25am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Designing Fast and Beautiful Maps

    by Tom MacWright and Eric Gundersen

    Open source tools let you design fast and beautiful interactive maps using your own data and share them on the web and mobile. This keynote will be a walk through showing how to use TileMill, and how it integrates with the web. Eric will take you from a spreadsheet to a custom designed map and then share it from a cloud map hosting service using embeddable widgets and the MapBox API.

    At 9:25am to 9:35am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

    Coverage video

  • Responsive Design–The Future of Mapping

    by Bruce Daniel

    Responsive Design is all about how structure can adjust to various environments, user activities and form factors. First we’ll look at the core concepts of Responsive Design and how they’re applied in a typical web setting, noting the methods used. Then we’ll see how maps naturally follow some of those basic principles. For example, maps alter both design and information based on scale – not unlike adjusting detailed website information for small screen display.

    An overview of the technical status of online mapping shows that the move away from a “baked” raster tileset to a vector-based world of geographic data opens the door to even more flexible display and response. What is particularly exciting is how Responsive Design might be applied to a wide variety of environmental and behavioral factors. We’ll take a look at some of these factors beyond just adjustment for screen size and orientation. For instance, consider factors like: speed (main roads and type becoming more prominent as speed increases); user input (map detail responding to touch gestures); actual physical environment (location-based weather and seasonal information altering the look of the map); moods and modes; and various location-based activities (when you’re in a park, showing contour information). Each factor/response demonstrates how the design and display of geographic information might shift and respond to provide the best map to meet the moment.

    Lots of visuals.

    At 9:40am to 9:50am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Stratocam: Discovering The World's Best Satellite Imagery

    by Paul Rademacher

    You see satellite imagery on Google Maps all the time, but how often do you stop to admire the amazing structures, patterns, and colors of our planet? Stratocam is a new web app, described as “Hot-or-Not for maps,” that lets you discover and vote on the best satellite imagery around the world, and take your own snapshots of the planet for others to see.

    At 9:50am to 10:00am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • What the MAC?

    by Toby Joe Boudreaux

    If you notice a black box hidden behind a plant while you’re here, don’t be alarmed. We’re capturing Media Access Control (MAC) addresses to track location and flow patterns of Where Conference attendees. This keynote will explain exactly what we’re doing and how, data privacy precautions, as well as visualization and open data use cases.

    At 10:00am to 10:05am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Saving The World With Geodata

    by Eric Fischer

    For decades, planners and engineers have been painstakingly hand-counting people and vehicles in handfuls of locations for short windows of time in attempts to understand how people use space and how it can be adapted to be more comfortable and effective for different user groups.

    The past few years have seen a revolution in cheap GPS receivers and mobile data devices, so now, to augment these small, scattered surveys, we are awash in noisy but vast data from geotagged messages and photos revealing where hundreds of thousands of people were at different times on different dates and something about what they were doing there. At the same time, public location feeds for vehicles provide a constantly updating picture of traffic conditions at thousands of locations.

    In both of these real-time sources, for most places, the same patterns repeat over and over, so when the pattern for a place changes, it means something significant has happened there. A physical or social change has somehow made the place more or less popular with people, or has reallocated road space to a different mode, or has changed the speed or pattern of traffic.

    By knowing that a change has happened, we can then hope to learn why it happened, and, if it is a change for the better, apply the lesson to other places, and if for the worse, avoid making the same mistake again. The dream is to learn how to best balance the needs of different transportation modes, including, critically, pedestrians, and to understand from the past what effect can be expected from different decisions in the future.

    At 10:05am to 10:15am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • When To *Not* Use Maps

    by Noah Iliinsky

    We all love maps, because maps are great. That’s why we’re here, right? But it turns out that sometimes maps aren’t the right answer when it comes to visually presenting data with a spatial component. Noah Iliinsky will discuss why, and how to figure out when to not map your data. And of course some examples will be shown where a better choice is a non-standard map, and some where the best representation doesn’t involve a map at all.

    At 10:45am to 11:00am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

    Coverage video

  • Grassroots Mapping Flight Demo

    by Public Laboratory

    Balloons are a central tool in the Public Laboratory mapping kit. Mathew Lippincott will demonstrate a camera-bearing helium balloon that is small enough to fly without prior FAA clearance to altitudes up to 4000 ft. It is an approachable, inexpensive way for civic organizations to document their events and environments. Small-scale mapping offers communities high temporal as well as spacial resolution, capturing phenomena ranging from Deepwater Horizon oil to vegetation growth to occupy camps.

    At 11:00am to 11:05am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Location, Context, And Preferences: The Perfect Push Messaging Cocktail

    by Scott Kveton

    Today’s smartest brand marketers get the importance of speaking to people on their own terms. The ideal cocktail of location-based messaging includes a dash of permission and a strong dose of context to turn a one-way push message into a two-way dialogue. We’ll dig into how adding in customer preferences, demographics, environmental elements, along with location will take mobile messaging into new dimensions.

    At 11:05am to 11:15am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Dwolla: Ubiquity by Design

    by Ben Milne

    Dwolla’s architecture, technologies, accessibility and even its price point, serve as the foundation for what the startup believes to the payment network of the 21st century. Ben Milne, founder and builder at Dwolla, will elaborate on how new advancements, like location-based technologies, are helping pave the way a chance at ubiquity.

    At 11:15am to 11:30am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Location, Social, and Mobile - The Key Foundations of a Marketplace Model

    by Leah Busque

    Think back 10 to 15 years ago, there was probably a kid in your neighborhood that you could pay a couple bucks to wash your car or mow your lawn. We’ve lost that sense of community over the years because the age of the internet has siloed us. With the social networking in full force, that is changing. Social, location, and mobile technologies are creating a meaningful foundation to connect a neighborhood both on and offline. Technology has finally caught up to human behavior, and we are able to use the internet to get off the internet and build a strong community together. Leah will discuss how these technology trends are paving the way for new marketplace businesses and why they are so important to the success of these models.

    At 11:30am to 11:40am, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Contagions, Conquest, & Quarantines: Mapping Disease From Venice to Houston

    by Thomas Goetz

    Disease, especially infectious disease, has always been dependent on location. The first quarantines occurred in 14th century Venice, requiring visiting sailors to spend 40 days (‘quaranta’) aboard before they could disembark, lest they spread ills from some distant land. And when syphilis began to march across Europe in the late 15th century, it was first known in Italy as the French Disease (thanks to French soliders), while in France it was called the Italian Disease. Meanwhile, in Holland it was the Spanish Disease; in Russia, it was the Polish Disease, and so on. (In fact, the disease most likely came over from the Americas in 1494, one of less auspicious of Columbus’ discoveries.)

    Even before the Germ Theory was developed in the 1870s, it was impossible to separate disease from place. When an outbreak of disease occurred, it created, all at once, a new map that created new rules for trade, politics, and society. But not all infections were outbreaks – the slow, unstoppable march of tuberculosis changed the perception of space and logistics on a different pace, creating a less sudden but no less significant dislodging of social conventions and forging new patterns of migration and development.

    This talk will explore the legacy of infectious disease on our perceptions of geography and space. It will distinguish between the “fast maps” that came with outbreaks, and the “slow maps” that emerged as entire nations tried to outrun a ferocious killer like TB. And it will connect these fast and slow maps to our contemporary quest to eliminate infectious disease altogether – tracking it down town by town until it fades from the map altogether.

    At 11:40am to 12:00pm, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • How Tablets are Changing the Face of Maps

    by Danny Moon

    The tablet market has exploded with over 60 millions units sold to date. The result is a new type of user experience that goes beyond smartphones and desktops. Some call it the “curl up” experience, in which users both absorb and engage content. It’s an experience driven by touchscreens, screen size and connectivity, and it unlocks new and exciting opportunities for map-makers. We will discuss examples how some of the core features of mapping - navigation, search, and cartography - are being upgraded for the tablet experience, and what new mapping concepts can be brought into play on these devices.

    At 1:10pm to 1:30pm, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Overcoming the Challenges of Indoor Navigation

    by Nick Farina

    “But I thought indoor GPS doesn’t exist.” If you work in the location-based services industry, you’ve probably heard that sentiment at least daily. In a 15-minute session, Nick Farina will discuss the technical, design, and infrastructure challenges of indoor navigation, as well as how some mobile developers and IT teams have overcome them. Borrowing from 10 years experience in mobile development for navigation apps — namely his experience developing the first indoor GPS-like app with Cisco for the American Museum of Natural History — Farina will review a number of successul strategies for helping visitors navigate indoor locales.

    At 1:40pm to 2:00pm, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • OS Geo Projects

    by Georgy Potapov, Javier de la Torre, Zain Memon, FireWhat Inc., Vladimir Ermakov and Jonathan LeBlanc

    This session encompasses speakers and content from the following sessions:

    Tiling GeoData with TileStache
    Zain Memon, Trulia
    TileStache is an open source Python app that serves map tiles. It can create image, vector, or data tiles from sources like a Mapnik config, a PostGIS database, a shapefile, or another Python application. In this talk, I’ll cover some of the ways I’ve used TileStache to trivialize the task of accessing geodata.

    Popularizing Satellite Data for Crisis Mapping
    Georgy Potapov, R&D Center SCANEX
    Vladimir Ermakov, University of Carnegie Mellon
    Accurate real-time data is crucial for effective response in crisis situations. Access to satellite monitoring data is too difficult to obtain in time required from specialized services designed for the scientific community. This talk describes a web-based solution that aims to provide near-real data about wildfires and other natural disasters for use in crisis mapping and emergency response.

    CartoDB: How Working With Geospatial Data Can Be A Joy and Not A Pain
    Javier de la Torre, Vizzuality
    CartoDB makes beautiful, fast online maps powered by PostGIS and Mapnik, with easy import tools and a user friendly interface. In this workshop you’ll produce insightful, thought provoking maps of police activity, and along the way will learn how to use data from open data repositories, perform powerful spatial analyses, and share a stunning map online.

    Incident Action Plan Project (IAP Project)
    Sam Lanier, FireWhat Inc.
    In 2009, Wildfires accounted for nearly 3.7 Billion in Federal Disaster Funds. The Incident Action Plan Project moves to automate how Emergency Personnel respond to such catastropic incidents. The project aims to eliminate the antiquated practices and utilize existing data sources to streamline Crisis Mapping for Emergency Responders by use of readily available technology.

    ql.io
    Jonathan LeBlanc, X.commerce
    ql.io is a declarative, evented, data-retrieval and aggregation gateway for HTTP APIs. Through ql.io, application developers can increase engineering clock speed and improve the end user experience. ql.io can reduce the number of lines of code required to call multiple HTTP APIs while simultaneously bringing down network latency and bandwidth usage in certain use cases.

    ql.io consists of a domain-specific language inspired by SQL and JSON, and a node.js-based runtime to process scripts written in that language. ql.io is an open source project available on Github and demos, examples, and docs are available on the main site.

    At 2:10pm to 2:50pm, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Where 2012: Launch Presentations

    by Jaak Laineste, Alex Gaber, jontirmandi, Michael Bauer and Paul Rademacher

    These back-to-back 5-minute launch sessions showcase companies and products debuting at Where.

    Zombies! Awake!
    Michael Bauer, Brilliant Arc
    You’re a zombie. A mobile local zombie. All hungry zombies have to pick a restaurant on their mobile application first. We help zombies find brains whether they’re in restaurants, convenience stores, or supermarkets.

    Satellite Art
    Paul Rademacher, Tasty Labs
    As geo developers, we look at satellite imagery all the time. But how often do you just sit back and admire these amazing hi-res images of our world? In this presentation we’ll look at the accidental artistry of satellite images. Fractal deserts, manicured farms, geometric cities, industrial wastelands – already photographed and waiting to be framed.

    Locus
    Jon Tirmandi, Normative Inc + Normative Labs Inc.
    See how we at Locus help brands build meaningful augmented experiences.

    Open Plug Web Studio
    Alex Gaber, Alcatel Lucent
    Learn about Open Plug Web Studio the first and industry leading software that lets Microsoft developers create cross platform apps as fast as the pace of the web. A Mac is no longer required if you want to submit applications to the iTunes app store. We’ll demonstrate how developers can speed applications by using the Open Plug software as a key advantage in their tool kit.

    Nutiteq 3D Mobile Mapping SDK
    Jaak Laineste, Nutiteq
    Applications powered by Nutiteq SDK have been available for several years and these are used by over 10 million end-users. Nutiteq announces the new generation of its key product: Nutiteq 3D mobile mapping SDK which enables to upgrade your mobile location-based applications to 3D views with minimal haggle.

    At 3:30pm to 4:10pm, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Geostack In The Cloud: Build Real Time, Targeted Mobile Experience On The Right Geostack

    by Maria Zhang

    The good news: your customers are starting to download your app and hit your mobile site. The bad news: they want more than your laptop experience – they crave a uniquely mobile experience, complete with almost every location-based and social bell and whistle known to man.

    Take a deep breath – it’s not simple, but you can do this. Whether your goal is to revamp your store location map, share deals on nearby products, or show local news and events, a service-oriented architecture in the cloud can provide a way to conquer each of your development projects, in priority, and at scale.

    This session will address mobile architecture best practices and pitfalls:

    Advantages of a SOA approach to serving place data, geolocated products, or place-related social content to mobile clients
    Choices between between Hadoop, Cassandra, Hypertable, Amazon SimpleDB, and solutions like MongoDb, CouchDb, RavenDb
    Recommendations for client-agnostic delivery

    At 4:20pm to 5:00pm, Tuesday 3rd April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

Wednesday 4th April 2012

  • Welcome

    by brady forrest

    Opening remarks by Brady Forrest, Where Conference program chair.

    At 9:00am to 9:05am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • News Through Data

    by blprnt

    Jer Thorp, Data Artist in Residence, The New York Times.

    At 9:05am to 9:20am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • The Microwork Revolution

    by Leila C. Janah

    What if recent high school and university graduates in rural Kenya were able to work for Fortune 500 companies here in the U.S.? The internet is changing the face of the global workforce. For the first time in human history, we can tap the brainpower at the bottom of the economic pyramid and access a motivated, trained workforce in poor communities around the world.

    Samasource connects thousands of trained women and youth to full-time digital work opportunities, giving them the opportunity influence entire industries, from data mining, to groundtruth projects to image tagging. Learn how our model is changing businesses and lives around the world.

    At 9:20am to 9:30am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Responsive Design–The Future of Mapping

    by Bruce Daniel

    Responsive Design is all about how structure can adjust to various environments, user activities and form factors. First we’ll look at the core concepts of Responsive Design and how they’re applied in a typical web setting, noting the methods used. Then we’ll see how maps naturally follow some of those basic principles. For example, maps alter both design and information based on scale – not unlike adjusting detailed website information for small screen display.

    An overview of the technical status of online mapping shows that the move away from a “baked” raster tileset to a vector-based world of geographic data opens the door to even more flexible display and response. What is particularly exciting is how Responsive Design might be applied to a wide variety of environmental and behavioral factors. We’ll take a look at some of these factors beyond just adjustment for screen size and orientation. For instance, consider factors like: speed (main roads and type becoming more prominent as speed increases); user input (map detail responding to touch gestures); actual physical environment (location-based weather and seasonal information altering the look of the map); moods and modes; and various location-based activities (when you’re in a park, showing contour information). Each factor/response demonstrates how the design and display of geographic information might shift and respond to provide the best map to meet the moment.

    Lots of visuals.

    At 9:45am to 9:55am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Gaming Reality

    by Will Wright

    Our conception of modern interactive games has typically been as fantasy escapism. These are worlds we go into to get a break from our normal, everyday lives. In these microcosms we can be a wizard, a space marine or rule a simulated kingdom. But what if games took a different perspective? What if games were designed to engage you more deeply in your personal reality rather than just distracted you from it?

    We’re at a point now where our ubiquitous technology can build an amazing situational awareness of each of us, if we let it. From that awareness we open the possibility of a new lens on our world, a whole new sense in a way. I’d like to talk about what going down this path might look like from my point of view.

    At 9:55am to 10:15am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Mobilizing Health

    by Deborah Estrin

    Many chronic health conditions are heavily influenced by lifestyle and location: from diabetes and asthma to depression and sleep. Mobile health (mHealth) leverages the power and ubiquity of mobile technologies to monitor and manage symptoms and side effects outside the clinical setting; and to map the environmental and social factors that can bring on or exacerbate these conditions.

    At 10:45am to 11:00am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Ultramapping: The New Geospatial Awareness

    by Adam Greenfield

    We are collectively experiencing the most significant single evolution in mapping since someone first scratched plans on papyrus. One relatively recent and very simple intervention, made possible by the lamination together of three or four different kinds of technology, has completely changed what a map is, what it means, what we can do with it.

    It’s this: that for the very first time in human history, our maps tell us where we are on them.

    The fact that such depictions can now also render layers of dynamic, real-time situational information seems almost incidental to me compared to this. This one development subtly but decisively removes the locative artifacts we use from the order of abstraction. By finding ourselves situated on the plane of a given map, we’re being presented with the implication that this document is less a diagram and more a direct representation of reality — and, what’s more, one with a certain degree of fidelity, one that can be verified empirically by the simple act of walking around. How is that not epochal?

    I’d argue that this begins to color our experience of all maps, even those that remain purely imaginary. We begin to look for the pulsing crosshairs or the shiny, cartoony pushpin that say YOU ARE HERE. The ability to locate oneself becomes bound up with the meaning of any representation of space whatsoever.

    Now bring everything implied by dynamic visualization back into the picture: all those routinely gorgeous renderings of subway ridership or crime or air quality imply something very different when you can either find yourself within their ambit or cannot. At its rawest, the suggestion is this: either these issues affect me, or they do not. And this is true even if what is being mapped is a purely historical event. The implication is there, however faint.

    I’ve been a map fan all my life. I must have spent literally hundred of hours poring over various representations of place real and imagined, from the AAA TripTiks and Guides Michelin that used to litter the family car, to the Middle-Earth and Ringworld charts that so awed me when I was nine (“contour interval violated on Fist-of-God”), to the land-navigation block of the Army’s Primary Leadership Development Course (repeat after me: “a line drawing, to scale, of a portion of the Earth’s surface as seen from above”).

    Nothing in all that, though, prepared me for the frisson of holding an iPhone in my hand for the first time, launching Google Maps, pressing a single button…and being located, told where I was to within a couple of meters. It’s a real epistemic break, isn’t it? Those who come after us will have a hard time imagining that there was ever such a thing as a map that couldn’t do that.

    This keynote presentation aims to explore all the implications of what I call “ultramapping” for self and society.

    At 11:00am to 11:10am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Hilary Mason

    by Hilary Mason

    Keynote by Hilary Mason, Chief Scientist at bitly.

    At 11:10am to 11:20am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Inbound Marketing Local Businesses on the Web

    by Rand Fishkin

    Small, hyper-local businesses often struggle to compete for attention and interest online. Business owners and small-business marketers have limited time, even more limited resources and must reach the most targeted customers in a scalable fashion. Inbound marketing – the combination of SEO, social, content and conversion practices can be a phenomenal path for those seeking to earn the right audience without spending a fortune. This presentation will cover the broad concept of inbound marketing as well as provide detailed tactics and examples of local businesses doing extraordinary things on the web.

    At 11:20am to 11:30am, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

  • Honing the World's Map

    by Brian McClendon

    Google is working on improving map data around the world using many avenues. Traditional cartographic, indoor, 3D, and even temporal components are all part of the equation but there is far to go before the virtual world matches the real one.

    At 11:40am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 4th April

    In Yerba Buena Salon 9, San Francisco Marriott Marquis

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