dConstruct 2013 schedule

Friday 6th September 2013

  • Opening remarks

    by Jeremy Keith

    At 10:00am to 10:15am, Friday 6th September

  • Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

    by Amber Case

    In this presentation, Geoloqi co-founder Amber Case will take you on a journey through the history of calm technology, wearable computing, and how developers and designers can make apps “ambient” and inspire delight instead of constant interaction.

    This talk will focus on trends in wearable computing starting from the 1970’s-2010’s and how mobile interfaces should take advantage of location, proximity and haptics to help improve our lives instead of get in the way.

    At 10:15am to 11:00am, Friday 6th September

  • Infinite Inputs

    by Luke Wroblewski

    In the beginning… there was the keyboard and the mouse. Today, the kinds of input our computing devices support keeps growing: touch, voice, device motion, and much more. Each additional input type offers new possibilities for interaction that requires our interface designs to adapt.

    When will this deluge of new input types end so don’t have to keep re-designing our software? It won’t. Not until everything is input.

    At 11:00am to 11:30am, Friday 6th September

  • Don’t Feed the Trolls

    by Nicole Sullivan

    The web community is one of the most vibrant and fun groups I’ve ever been lucky enough to be a part of. Like any vibrant community, sometimes people don’t play nicely.

    In this session, I will discuss what it has been like to be shy and be on twitter, mailing lists, and open source. I’ll talk about my experiences consulting on massive CSS overhauls, and ways to defeat trolls—including your own inner troll!

    I’ll also share a timing attack for your brain that might just surprise you.

    At 12:00pm to 12:30pm, Friday 6th September

  • Great, things are connected, but what will they actually talk about?

    by Simone Rebaudengo

    We take it for granted that smart and connected products will bring a benefit to our lives, but connecting is only the first step.

    To get away from the repetitive visions of the connected, efficient and sterile home of the future and to look for new and more human scenarios, we need to shift from designing internets to designing relationships of things.

    People have bias, stereotypes and cultural beliefs that they pass into the products that they design. Companies have business goals that they have to meet and rivalries with other competitors. If we take the point of view of a product in this scenario, how will its life change?

    New relationships and conversations will emerge between products with different goals or references and at the same time with people that will live with them.

    If we stop only drawing dotted lines between products, but we actually start looking at what relationship could emerge on that line, we will find ourselves exploring a new way of understating services and interactions with connected products.

    At 12:30pm to 1:00pm, Friday 6th September

  • Tech and the uncanny

    by Sarah Angliss

    Sarah Angliss is a composer, automatist and sound historian, fascinated with the uncanny (Das Unheimliche) - an idea she researches through her performance, her robotic creations and in the archives.

    The uncanny is the familiar, presented in an unfamiliar form, something we find strangely compelling yet unsettling. It’s the voice message that remains after death, the ventriloquist’s dummy, the hyper-real video game character or the Doppelgänger of folklore.

    At dConstruct, Sarah will consider how we can harness the uncanny to make digital experiences more compelling. She’ll also be exploring moments in history when technology, from phonographs to mobile phones, seemed to take on a peculiar caste - causing fault lines in our understanding of human identity.

    According to Sarah, if you’re looking for the next revolution in telecommunications, go in search of the uncanny.

    At 2:30pm to 3:00pm, Friday 6th September

  • The Heroes and Anti-heroes of the Information Age

    by Keren Elazari

    In the information age, data is the new currency and access to it is power. With battle cries such as “Information wants to be free”, “Hack the planet” and “we are legion” – Hackers have risen to infamy. But why are they so influential and how are they shaping the world to come?

    Hackers, as manipulators of technology and information, are playing a key role in the future of man & machines evolution. As change agents, they continuously push the boundaries of technology, exploring new frontiers such hacking the human body and the brain, turning science fiction inspirations into a reality. Hackers are people who can communicate with machines – and the world needs such individuals to act as mediators, synthesizers and modems - between data, humanity and technology.

    But Hackers can also be villains, creating dangerous technologies. So, with great power comes great responsibility, and the transformative power of hacking can become a positive influence in years to come, but only if we learn to embrace and harness it.

    At 3:00pm to 3:30pm, Friday 6th September

  • Fan is a Tool-Using Animal

    by Maciej Ceglowski

    What happens when you build a nice website, and a real community shows up that doesn't meet your expectations?

    Since the earliest days of Usenet, fandom has wandered the Internet, finding remarkable ways to assemble websites, plug-ins, and online forums into tools for sharing and organizing erotic fiction. Often ostracized and ridiculed for their hobby, this community of rather gentle people has learned to work with the materials at hand, building for themselves what they could not get from others, in the process creating a culture of collaboration and mutual respect other online projects can only envy.

    Fans are inveterate classifiers, and the story of how they have bent websites to their will (in a process reminiscent of their favorite works) may change the way you think about online communities, or at the very least, about librarians.

    At 3:30pm to 4:00pm, Friday 6th September

    Coverage audio clip

  • Unexpected Item In The Bagging Area

    by Dan Williams

    In the 1980s geophysicist Andy Hildebrand was working for Exxon analysing seismic survey data. Hildebrand created digital signal processing software that took recordings of waves travelling through the ground from dynamite explosions and processed them to find hidden pockets of oil.

    In 2013 the software has a new name and a very different purpose. You can hear its output on the radio, on YouTube and on X-Factor. No longer a tool for geophysicists but for pop stars. Auto-Tune uses the same process that identified underground rock layers to make vocals sound pitch perfect. To an algorithm there is no difference between Kanye’s voice and an oil deposit.

    Auto-Tune isn’t the only technology shaping our lives in unexpected ways. In this talk we’ll look at our software mediated world, it's consequences and our role in it as creators.

    At 4:30pm to 5:00pm, Friday 6th September

    Coverage video note

  • Is My Laptop Ruining My Life?

    In his talk Adam considers the pros and cons of life lived through a laptop.

    At 5:00pm to 5:45pm, Friday 6th September

    Coverage video

  • Planning Adaptive Interfaces

    by Aaron Gustafson

    How do you plan for the unknown? The answer is obvious—you can’t—but that’s not a bad thing. Unknowns can be scary, but they also create opportunity.

    On the web, it’s tempting to focus our effort around what we know (or think we know) about our customers based on analytics data we’re collecting and our own experience of the web. Similarly, we often get hung up on trying to give every customer the exact same experience of our product. What we need to realize, however, is that analytics and anecdotal knowledge only get you so far. Our customers’ access and experience of the web is highly variable, deeply personal, and, more often than not, completely out of our control.

    But take heart, all is not lost. By being flexible in our approach and embracing the unknown, we can create user experiences that are intended to vary from device to device, browser to browser, and network to network.

    In this workshop, Aaron Gustafson will explain the ins and outs of crafting rich web experiences that adapt to the capabilities and peculiarities of our customers and their devices, while maintaining your sanity in the proces. You’ll leave with:

    an understanding of the challenges (and possibilities) presented by the wide range of browsers and devices being used to access the web;
    a fresh perspective on interface design, grounded in the progressive enhancement philosophy;
    ideas around how to tailor experiences based on device capabilities;
    solid strategies for determining how common UI components can be re-imagined in an adaptive fashion; and
    a practical knowledge of how HTML, CSS, and JavaScript can be deployed in the service of adaptive user interfaces.

    On Friday 6th September

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