Html5.tx 2013 schedule

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Friday 1st February 2013

  • CSS3: From Novice to Ninja

    by Estelle Weyl

    Web development without Photoshop and without IDs or classes? What was impossible 5 years ago is almost simple to do with CSS3. Prototyping with CSS3 (versus sliced up images) has made the development process fun again. Yes, there is new syntax to learn, and different browsers sometimes require slightly different markup, but the power is worth the pain. And, once you understand the syntax, there are tools so CSS3 isn't a memorization game. Improved development time, reduced maintenance costs, SEO, accessibility and site performance? What more could you ask for?

    How about all of it, all in 1 day! In this full day workshop you will learn about the capabilities of CSS3, progressive design principles, time saving techniques, and debugging and development tools. Yes, we'll cover rounded corners, but this skills-based workshop will cover so much more, including selectors, media queries, colors, border effects, background effects, gradients, animations, transitions and transformations.

    WHAT WILL BE COVERED?
    Many advanced CSS3 features and the issues surrounding them, including:
    Hacks, browser support and browser quirks
    Tools for creating CSS3 (once you fully understand the syntax)
    CSS Debuggers: Use browser tools to debug and pixel perfect
    Mobile debugging

    WHO THIS WORKSHOP FOR?
    This workshop is targeted at designers and developers who already work with CSS, and perhaps even use some features of CSS3, and want to become really proficient in advanced features of CSS3. If you don't know what
    p {color: red;}
    does, this is too advanced for you. If you have never written
    input[type=number]:nth-of-type(2n):out-of-range + label {color: red;}
    you'll learn a ton.

    WHO IS TEACHING THIS?
    Estelle Weyl is an internationally published author, speaker, trainer, and consultant. Estelle started her professional life in architecture, interning at Arte Charpentier in Paris, but decided instead to be a web standardista. A UI Engineer, she has consulted for Kodakgallery, SurveyMonkey, Yahoo! and Apple, among others. Estelle shares esoteric tidbits learned while programming CSS, JavaScript and HTML, provides tutorials and detailed grids of CSS3 and HTML5 browser support in her blog at http://www.standardista.com. She is the author of Mobile HTML5, What's Next in CSS3, HTML5: The Definitive Guide and HTML5 and CSS3 for the Real World. While not coding, she works in construction, de-hippifying her 1960’s throwback abode.

    At 9:00am to 5:00pm, Friday 1st February

    In Omni Austin Hotel Downtown

Saturday 2nd February 2013

  • Welcome and Opening Circle

    by H. Alan Stevens and Brandon Satrom

    At 8:00am to 8:50am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Adaptive Images for Responsive Web Design

    by Christopher Schmitt

    The open web doesn't stop at our desktop. Smart phones and tablets not only contain more computing power and better browsers than the computers that started the Internet economy, they have better displays.

    In this session presented by Christopher Schmitt, we will work through tips and tricks to develop future friendly images in our sites and apps.

    At 9:00am to 9:40am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Embedded JavaScript, HTML5 and the Internet of Things

    by Jesse Cravens

    JavaScript is everywhere, but one of the most fascinating areas is in the crossroads of distributed, real time applications and microcontrollers. Take a look into the world of Node.js, HTML5 Connectivity APIs, and Embedded Linux, and how this world is changing the traditional client and server relationship. Explore the impact these trends are having on the HTML5 user interface, see demos of JavaScript powered microcontrollers (Arduino, XBee, Beaglebone, and the Raspberry Pi), learn asynchronous coding patterns, and discover some of the newer APIs that are helping JavaScript developers step out of the web browser and into the world of physical computing, robotics, and hardware.

    At 9:00am to 9:40am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom B, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Taking an Image Editor Offline

    by Bradley Meck

    Canvas + ApplicationCache + FileSystem API (using polyfills).

    We will take an existing application an move it to be offline capable. We will take some time and explain how to use the filesystem API and polyfills in order to move an online image editor to an offline capable one. Attendees should be familiar with ApplicationCache and the concepts of the FileSystem API but will have no need for in depth knowledge.

    At 9:00am to 9:40am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • Backbone: 3 Ways

    by Pamela Fox

    Backbone is one of the most popular MVC frameworks for JavaScript these days, and one of the reasons for its popularity is that its minimal and lightweight. That makes it easy to use in different ways and adapt to different projects - but can also make it hard to learn.

    In this talk, I'll start with Backbone basics, and then dive into three different ways that we use it to power the frontends of Coursera.org.

    At 9:50am to 10:30am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Defying Facebook: Creating High Performance Mobile Apps

    by Burke Holland

    Earlier this year everyone was flying high with expectations for building mobile applications with HTML5. jQuery Mobile was in full swing, and new platforms like Icenium were making the process seamless. Then Mark Zuckerberg pulled out the rug when he declared that the slowness of their Facebook iOS application was because they "Bet too heavily on HTML5".

    The truth is that HTML5 mobile applications are no different than any other application. They need to be optimized. Since we use them across so many different platforms, they REALLY need to be tweaked for performance. In this session, Burke Holland will show you how to build HTML5 mobile apps that perform like they are purely native, not like laggy web sites. Learn about common pitfalls and snags that can eat your lunch as a developer if you don't know what to watch out for. Building apps with HTML5 is still the most cost effective way to target mobile, and that doesn't have to come at the cost of performance.

    At 9:50am to 10:30am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • DOM it, forgive, forget, embrace

    by Cody Lindley

    The browser wars were fought not with literal weapons, but with implementations like the DOM. The aftermath left us with an ever growing landscape of libraries, frameworks, and polyfills, pushing knowledge and talk about the DOM itself aside. Sure, it has a few battle scars, but things are shifting. The DOM is still very much a part of HTML5, and in recent years, not only evolving and improving (i.e. DOM4), but being implemented consistently across modern browsers (well, more consistently than in the past). In this talk, we will forgive and forget the historical DOM by examining and embracing the parts of the DOM that all front-end and JavaScript developers should know.

    At 9:50am to 10:30am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom B, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Building CSS Foundations

    by Jake Smith

    Code duplication, bloat and specificity battles are very common problems when sites grow, and they can spell disaster for site performance. In this session we will cover code organization and naming conventions to help your site grow. Attendees will learn how to build sites with the most reusable CSS possible.

    At 10:40am to 11:20am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Managing a Large Front-End Project with Automated Build Tools

    by Kassandra Perch

    How do you manage a huge web application's front-end when you have a diverse team of programmers, and javascript is not a strong suit for all of them? How do you handle both new and old code from multiple developers, and make sure only quality code makes it into your repos? Automated tools such as Yeoman and Grunt are not just for packaging your web project in a performant and clean package. They also allow you to enforce code quality and consistency through automated quality checking, testing, and beautification. This talk will go over the case study of a large web application in need of a refactor and test suite, and how tools such as Yeoman and Grunt allow you to implement a plan to bring projects like these back from the brink, without losing your sanity in the process.

    At 10:40am to 11:20am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom B, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage note video

  • The New Rules of The Responsive Web

    by Matthew Carver

    Responsive web design. How many times in the last two years have you discussed it? How many projects have you been lately that have been described as "responsive"? With everyone weighing in on the subject and new lessons being learned about it daily, its hard to get a grasp on what makes "Responsive web design" important and more than a passing fad.

    The current adoption of tablets, smartphones, and other internet enabled devices have made the practices of responsive design almost an assumed technical requirement in modern web development. As we, as web professionals experience the growth pains of this new approach, new rules and standards are emerging.

    In this session I will cover the new rules of the responsive web. This includes the use of rapid prototypes, the use of Scalable and Modular Architecture for CSS (SMACSS), and using Style Tiles for web design.

    At 10:40am to 11:20am, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Browser Versions Are Dead

    by Kyle Simpson

    The browser version is a dead concept. Stop caring about the browser version, its update cycle, and even (to some extent), its intrinsic capabilities.

    Every single person who’s ever worked in Web development has, more or less, been fed a lie. It’s a lie that’s so insidious that it’s actually mutated the way our Web development industry works from the inside out. It’s made us worse as an industry. It’s cost untold billions of dollars in lost time.

    What is that lie? “The browser version matters, because that’s how we know what it can and can’t do.” Or, put another way, “The browser version matters, because we have to know how to hack it so that it looks the same as every other browser.” The browser version is dead. Hacking around browser short-falls is dead. Compensating for non-compliance to standards is dead. UA sniffing is dead. Quit wasting your time!

    Let’s start retraining decision makers (customers, bosses, etc.) about how the Web and browsers really work.

    At 11:30am to 12:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • You Got your MVC into my Components: Adding Bindings to Enyo

    by W. Cole Davis and Dave Freeman

    Enyo (http://enyojs.com) started as an web application framework, focusing on the problem of effectively building reusable UI components. However, many app developers view problems through a Model-View-Controller (MVC) point-of-view where the UI is seen as a templating problem. This talk looks at how the Enyo framework evolved in late 2012 to take on aspects of MVC, integrating support for Backbone models and data binding into our component & message passing architecture. In doing so, it reveals what these two worlds can learn from each other, and how they both play into future work on the "web platform".

    At 11:30am to 12:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video note

  • How To Pass an Front-end Developer Interview with Me

    by djscoutmaster

    "How well do you know JS/HTML/CSS?
    Do you think you have what it takes to be considered as Top Talent in our industry or do you want to learn how to get to the next level?

    I have been interviewing candidates for Front-end Developer positions in the greater Austin-San Antonio-Dallas area for some time now and want to share what i have learned.

    In this session i will walk you though interview questions and discuss the gaps i have seen in developer understanding needed to catapult you to the next level."

    At 1:00pm to 1:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Jumping into HTML5 games

    by Austin Hallock

    An introductory level look at HTML5 games including various game engines with their strengths and weaknesses, as well as sets of tools like AppMobi and CocoonJS for faster performance on mobile devices. I'll also touch on best practices and how to effectively develop for all possible distribution channels (mobile, tablet, and desktop)

    At 1:00pm to 1:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Lightning talk: Drop the Widgets. Embrace HTML5.

    by Ryan Joy

    At 1:00pm to 2:00pm, Saturday 2nd February

  • Lightning Talks: Sharpen Your HTML5 Saw

    by Ryan Joy, Aaron Murray and Austin Hallock

    At 1:00pm to 1:40pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • Lightning Talks: The Softer Side of HTML5

    At 1:00pm to 1:40pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • Dodging Javascript Pitfalls

    by Aaron Murray

    Goal: Walk the audience through a series of common and mid-level Javascript gotchas that plague new/junior developers, or developers who don't have experience with scripting languages.

    Show some tips and techniques for writing and organizing code, files, and projects. Also cover various ways for getting Javascript code into a webpage, and the pros and cons for performance and maintainability.

    At 1:15pm to 1:25pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Lightning Talks: Adventures in Accessibility

    by Anne Epstein

    Curb cuts and TV captions - two accessibility features that fit so seamlessly into your world you may not even think about their origins in accessibility. Curious about how Accessibility might be relevant to you, the developer? A little accessibility can provide a richer experience for your users, help you reach a wider audience, and help you do something good for the world, too. This talk will approach accessibility from a developer’s perspective - what it is, how it fits into our daily work, and my lessons learned from competing in Austin AIR (Accessibility Internet Rally)

    At 1:15pm to 1:25pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Higher Education for Interaction Design: Preparing the designer of the 21st Century

    by William J. Moner

    The demand for college graduates well versed in all aspects of web design and development has risen in response to the proliferation of mobile devices, multiple screen sizes, web-based services, and advancements in HTML5 and associated industry standard technologies. Despite the push toward standardization, design firms continue to ask for graduates with skills teetering on obsolescence or ask for applicants with 5+ years experience in technologies that didn't exist five years ago. Several training companies and advisory groups have devised curricula to fill gaps in designer's technical skill sets, but user experience professionals require more than just software skills. In a down economy, employers face pressure to find college-educated employees with the ability to not only design but also develop Web sites and Web applications. Three university educators will discuss how one university currently integrates HTML5, mobile application design, and User Experience design into the curriculum, the pressures faced by universities to integrate these technologies into various programs, and how the growing field of interaction design might require a revolution in how courses are designed.

    At 1:30pm to 1:40pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • 10 things you didn't know a browser could do

    by Estelle Weyl

    It may feel like the HTML5, CSS3 and ECMAScript specifications are moving along at a snails pace, but browser capabilities are moving quickly, and it is difficult to keep up with all the new feature support. In this session we'll cover some brand spanking new and older but unknown features that make debugging, designing and developing more fun.

    At 1:50pm to 2:30pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Web Application Architecture – Lessons Learned from Brackets

    by Brian Rinaldi

    One of the best ways to learn is from other people’s code, and open source projects provide us with valuable coding examples. Using the architecture of Brackets, the open source code editor created by Adobe, as a guide, this session will examine some frameworks and practices for architecting applications using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. We’ll examine how this large-scale, open-source project built with web technologies and look for lessons you can apply to your own development projects.

    At 1:50pm to 2:30pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom B, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • What is Future Friendly?

    by Joe McCann

    Desktop. Laptop. Smartphone. Tablet. Phablet. Xbox. PS Vita. Smart TVs. That's a lot of places your content can live. Building specific experiences for each one of these simply doesn't scale. Let's find out why and how to tackle such an enormous problem.

    Being "Future Friendly" is not necessarily just a visual or interaction design decision, but an architectural decision as well. Furthermore, being "Future Friendly" is not about the web or native: it's both and more. We'll discuss why.

    At 1:50pm to 2:30pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • Front End Legos: Better Design with Reusable HTML & CSS

    by Shay Howe

    There are a million ways to write HTML and CSS, and everyone has their own, but is there a right way? Our code needs to be well structured, written in an organized manner, and performance driven. Sharing code with others should be a joyful experience, not absolute terror.

    In this session, Shay will cover some best practices and performance tips for writing the highest quality HTML and CSS possible. Writing code is the easy part, finding a practice and structure that works well across the board is the hard part. Shay will outline HTML and CSS conventions that can be applied to your everyday practice.

    At 2:40pm to 3:20pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • HTML5 on TV

    by Mike Taylor

    In this talk we'll cover the basics of of what it takes to develop an HTML5 webapp for connected TVs, covering UX, JS, CSS, and performance tuning.

    At 2:40pm to 3:20pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • Web Usability on a Budget

    by Tim G. Thomas

    Not all projects have the budget for UX designers; as a result, experience in disciplines such as user research, interaction design, and information architecture are often expected of all developers on a team. Fortunately, these arcane-sounding topics are far from impossible to grasp for mere programmer mortals. In this session, you'll learn some easy tricks to make your sites more approachable, discover ways to help develop an emotional connection between your apps and your users, and see some tools that can assist you with planning and designing your next masterpiece of usability.

    At 2:40pm to 3:20pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom B, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • JavaScript and Windows Store Apps - In the Trenches

    by Johnathan Hebert

    With the release of Windows 8, Microsoft has made it possible for developers to write native apps with JavaScript, HTML and CSS. There are lots of tutorials, videos and blog posts about getting started with JavaScript on Windows 8, so this talk will skip that stuff and focus on some of the real-world gotchas encountered while actually using the Windows Runtime (WinRT) APIs and running a native app in a browser sandbox. The talk will focus on differences between a regular browser app and a native Windows app, new host objects provided by WinRT, learning to love async promise APIs, making an app portable to a website, multi-touch and gestures in JavaScript and other interesting challenges unique to the Windows 8 environment.

    At 3:30pm to 4:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom A, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

    Coverage video

  • Model-View-Websockets

    by Garann Means

    Many front-end developers are familiar with MVC, and almost all are familiar with event-driven architectures (even if they call them something else). How do those two philosophies work together? And, more importantly, how can websockets help future applications become more responsive, more consistent, and easier to develop? We'll reexamine the Controller concept from MVC and figure out how to combine simple browser messaging and websockets to address our application needs and improve our user experiences.

    At 3:30pm to 4:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center

  • Unfolding the Box Model

    by Chris Ruppel

    CSS has long been an art of carefully positioning rectangles, allowing only a few properties like width, height, and x/y coordinates dictate where an element appears on a page. To add more depth you'd have to resort to images, JavaScript, or proprietary plugins in a pinch. However, the Open Web marches on, and CSS has become a rich tapestry of visual effects including animation, 3D, and even shaders.

    This session will highlight some of the amazing effects that are available using CSS 3D Transforms. Examples will be experimental in nature, and will hopefully inspire you to create your own beautiful works of CSS art!

    At 3:30pm to 4:10pm, Saturday 2nd February

    In Mabee Ballroom B, St. Edward’s University Ragsdale Center