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The Busy Java Developer's Guide to Java Concurrency (Workshop)

A session at JAX London 2013

Monday 28th October, 2013

1:30pm to 5:00pm (GMT)

Java was the first "mainstream" platform to include threading as a core facility of the JVM, which means that it also incorporates a synchronization mechanism. In this workshop, we go over the core Java threading support, the historical difference of "native" vs "green" threads (and why it matters today), and how Java5 introduced a number of useful abstractions to help make spinning up and using Threads much, much easier than the basic Thread class provides. Of course, multiple threads means concurrent access, and that means potential corruption if we don't protect the code somehow. We'll explore Java's object monitors, and how they provide atomic access, before examining Java's wait/notify signaling mechanism, built on top of the monitor concepts. Once we're through the basics, it'll be self-evident that this kind of low-level approach is sometimes awkward to use, and how the Java5 concurrent library offers up some higher-level--and easier-to-use--facilities.

About the speaker

This person is speaking at this event.
Ted Neward

Ted Neward is an Architectural Consultant with Neudesic, LLC as well as the Principal with Neward & Associates.

Ted Neward is an Architectural Consultant with Neudesic, LLC as well as the Principal with Neward & Associates. He speaks on the conference circuit discussing Java, .NET and XML service technologies, focusing on Java-.NET interoperability, programming languages, and virtual machine technologies. He has written several widely-recognized books in both the Java and .NET space, including the recently- released "Professional F#" and widely-acclaimed "Effective Enterprise Java".

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JAX London 2013

England England, Victoria

28th30th October 2013

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When

Time 1:30pm5:00pm GMT

Date Mon 28th October 2013

Short URL

lanyrd.com/schpwp

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Books by speaker

  • Server-Based Java Programming
  • Professional F# 2.0
  • Effective Enterprise Java

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