Sessions at NACIS 2013 on Thursday 10th October Regular program

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  • A Practical Introduction to D3 Web Maps

    by Carl Sack and Carl Sack

    For years, we Cartographers have suffered the burden of watching the high standards of our practice eroded on the Internet by shoddy mash-up after shoddy mash-up. Like Sisyphus we have labored to explain to our bewildered friends and colleagues that, in fact, Web Mercator is not a proper projection for a choropleth map (it isn’t even on an ellipsoid, for god sakes!). Yet, like Plato’s cave men, they merely answer back, “choro-what?” and go on publishing their data on top of Flat-Earth-Society raster tiles. Well, no more shall we sit idly by! Today, thanks to some clever chaps who care about how maps are made on the Web, we have the tools to do better. The presenter, who by no means claims to be an expert, will nevertheless bravely delve into the realm of Mike Bostock’s Data-Driven Documents library, and demonstrate how, with a little learning curve, it can be fun to use and create state-of-the-art, all-vector, good interactive web maps.

    At 8:15am to 9:05am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage link

  • Maps in Honduran Mosquitia for Collaborative Local Expressions of Territoriality and the Environment

    by John Kelly

    From 2007 through 2013, students at the University of Kansas, under the supervision of Dr. Peter Herlihy, have worked with indigenous leaders from the Miskitu and Tawahka regions of Honduras to create maps which express the territorial concepts of local peoples through local-language toponyms (place names) and land use locations. Data sources included extensive participatory mapping work conducted in the late 1990s as well as recent remote sensing imagery. The maps, in both paper and digital form, are already proving to be valuable tools as the region's residents interact with Honduran government agencies and other stakeholders during the present time of important land tenure (ownership) changes and clarifications, including changes regarding the role of conservation protected areas (e.g., the Rio Platano Biosphere Reserve).

    At 8:15am to 8:40am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • MINI WORKSHOP: Cartography 101 – Back to Basics

    by Sarah Bennett, Martin Elmer and Dylan Moriarty

    Take a break from the cutting edge of cartography to spend a little time learning about the fundamentals of mapmaking. Revisiting the basics is essential for the established professional. It is only when you've had some experience that you can truly appreciate and fully understand all that stuff that they were trying to teach you in school (and given that people only remember a fraction of what they hear in lecture, you might re-learn a few useful things you've forgotten). So come by for a refresher, or feel free to join us for your first go-around if you're a beginner! We'll touch on projections, typography, aesthetics, and more.

    TOPICS:
    What is a map?
    Visual Variables
    Visual Hierarchy / Layout

    NOTE: Brian Davidson withdrew as speaker on 30 Sept 2013.

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Thursday 10th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: New Views on Old Places

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: Online tools and templates

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Mapping in Early American Urban Sociology

    by Jonathan Lewis

    Maps were often at the center of early American urban sociological studies. In the late 1890s, both Jane Addams and W.E.B. DuBois created maps depicting minority neighborhoods. This paper examines the appearance, rise, and fall of maps created by University of Chicago sociologists who developed urban ecology. These maps employed concentric circles to argue that industrial development created common patterns of land use which fit a wide range of cities. Urban ecologists also invested the concentric zones with cultural and psychological significance, attracting individuals from some groups and generating distinct patterns of life captured by writers and artists residing in those areas. Briefly influential, urban ecology’s concentric zone maps met with intense criticism which led to a split between urban ecologists (who developed alternative mapping schemes) and sociologists (who saw urban ecology as too specialized to provide insight into emerging social and cultural developments).

    At 8:40am to 9:05am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • NEW TIME: Mapping as Digital Public Work: New California Water Atlas

    by chachasikes and Laci Videmsky

    We will talk about the New California Water Atlas, a project to make water understandable for Californians. This is a new kind of digital public work. We will talk about collaborative mapping, what we have learned about the state of open water data, and how we are using open government strategies to work with government agencies for improving data for journalists, community organizations, non-profits and others. http://ca.statewater.org @CAWaterAtlas

    At 9:05am to 9:30am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • The Interwoven Relationship Between Cartography and Dialectology: New Perspectives

    by Costanza Asnaghi

    Dialectologists have been employing cartographic representations of dialect areas since the beginning of their explorations at the end of the nineteenth century. Their main focus has usually been to accurately and practically report collected linguistic data behavior on a map, which seldom left space to refined map design. The goal of this paper is to draw an overview of current trends in cartographic representations for dialect research as well as as to provide new perspectives in the integration of dialect data and beautiful representations of effective linguistic maps. Innovative visualization models of regional linguistic variation in California English and in Italian will be discussed.

    At 9:05am to 9:25am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • Pictorial Maps in the Clark Library, University of Michigan

    by Tim Utter

    Pictorial representation has been used on maps for hundreds if not thousands of years, yet its use as a cartographic device has waned. The Clark Library has a collection of several hundred pictorial maps, many of which are heavily used including “Europe as a Woman” (ca. 1550), the maps of Jo Mora, the murals by Miguel Covarubbias, and those of the art deco style to name a few. The presentation will cover a brief history of pictorial maps using important maps from the Clark Library's collection.

    At 9:25am to 9:45am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • A Bathymetric Book: adventures in non-digital media

    by Caroline Rose

    In my ‘Bathymetric Book,’ mapping meets book arts, where the book is treated as a three dimensional space for creative communication. Representing the underwater relief of Crater Lake in stacked layers of paper, it’s a piece with a tactile quality that no digital map could offer. I will discuss the making of the book and the evolution of its design, as well as the future of the project. Thanks to the positive response that it sparked, I hope to take the design from a unique object to an edition of 50 to 100 copies. I’m tackling this challenge by joining a collaborative makerspace in Madison, Wisconsin, where I have access to a laser cutter and other technology as well as a community for sharing expertise. I’ll describe my progress and the challenges, solutions, and insights generated by this adventure in non-digital cartography.

    At 10:15am to 10:35am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • Designing a slippy map base layer for Humantiarian and Developing countries' Context using OSM Data

    by Will Skora, Yohan Boniface, Brian Wolford, Severin Menard and Jaakko Helleranta

    The HDM Map (Humanitarian Data Model) by HOT is a multi-zoom level base map that is designed to display OpenStreetMap data used in humanitarian contexts and developing countries. Since its creation in 2010 in response to the Haitian Earthquake, HOT (Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team) facilitates the creation and distribution of free geographic data remotely for humanitarian response and economic development.

    The HDM Map highlights features not typically found in online base maps including road smoothness and surface, craftsmen, service agencies, NGO offices, sanitation facilities, and SRTM terrain. With its open-source license and design written in CartoCSS (used in Tilemill), it's able to be easily customized and deployed for specific humanitarian crises. https://github.com/hotosm/HDM-Ca...

    At 10:15am to 10:35am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • MINI WORKSHOP: More than just coloring in: building maps with a solid analytical foundation

    by Linda Beale

    Useful maps require more than good cartography. Without a good understanding of the data; and how it needs to be processed and analysed even a good-looking map becomes compromised. Over time, more tools have become available for spatial analysis whilst the line between analyst and cartographer has blurred so, it becomes important to understand what analysis can offer to support better mapping.
    This workshop will look at a number of different of statistical and geostatistical approaches for spatial analysis. Using ArcGIS, we will explore many of the different approaches available for spatial analysis, look at assumptions that should be met and understand how to choose appropriate techniques. The workshop will include statistical descriptors, proximity analysis, distributions and comparisons and, surface and interpolation analysis. Some tips and tricks will be also discussed so that cartographers have a better understanding of what is available and how it supports their map-making endeavors.

    At 10:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: Experimental Practices

    At 10:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: Open source web mapping

    At 10:15am to 12:00pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • NEW: Principles of UI/UX Design for Cartography

    by Robert E. Roth

    At 10:35am to 10:55am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • Photographic Georeferencing: Finding the Unseen in Historical Views of the Grand Canyon

    by Nicholas Bauch

    Enchanting the Desert is a research initiative that uses an early-twentieth-century narrated, photographic slideshow of the Grand Canyon as its departure point. The project revives and augments the slideshow in an online, interactive format. Within the photographs themselves, geo-coded information from a variety of disciplines – e.g. folklore, biology, geology, art history – are merged to “enchant” the region of the Grand Canyon, turning the photos from a set of disorienting (if beautiful) images into a collection of places imbued with meaning and history that can be controlled and understood by the end user. The aims of the project are theoretical, technical, pedagogical, and artistic. In this presentation I will show my process of photographic georeferencing, as well as a printed viewshed map of the Grand Canyon based on the photographer’s original station points. These two outcomes emerged from the research process, and contribute to the final online product.

    At 10:35am to 10:55am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • SHUTDOWN: An Open Source Workflow for Building Online Maps

    by Mamata Akella

    At the National Park Service, we are implementing an open source workflow for the maps we create for the web. During this presentation I will discuss the suite of tools that we’ve adopted for our maps including tools we use for data management and design. In addition, I will discuss the Park Service’s adoption of OpenStreetMap and how we are incorporating these data into our mapping products and overall data collection efforts.

    At 10:35am to 10:55am, Thursday 10th October

    In Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • CANCELED: Speedy Delivery: Vector Tiles from Open Data

    by Michal Migurski

    Pre-rendered Bitmap tiles are old news. Vector data tiles rendered right in your browser are emerging from the open source software community, catching up to the high-speed, beautiful and low-bandwidth cartography already available in mobile map applications like Google and Apple Maps. The OpenStreetMap US Foundation is supporting work on global, up-to-date tiled vector data available now. This is a speculative talk about a possible near future for digital maps. I’ll cover data formats like GeoJSON and TopoJSON, free data sources like OpenStreetMap and Natural Earth Data, rendering environments like D3 and WebGL, and new rendering community experiments pushing the boundaries of digital cartography and data distribution.

    At 10:55am to 11:15am, Thursday 10th October

    In Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Lessons Learned from Experimental Film

    by Eric Theise

    During the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, American avant-garde filmmakers expanded the boundaries of cinema by experimenting with perception, duration, and narrative expectations. The libraries and frameworks for online mapping have evolved to a point where an examination of how these experimental film strategies might be applied to interactive cartography seems ripe. This presentation will pair maps with canonical film works of the American avant-garde, and might well form the core of an impractical cartography day.

    At 10:55am to 11:15am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • NEW: Guidelines for Consistently Readable Topographic Vectors and Labels with Toggling Backgrounds

    by Paulo Raposo

    At 10:55am to 11:15am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • CANCELED: Chesapeake Bay Story Maps

    by John Wolf

    The Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) is a unique regional partnership that leads and directs Chesapeake Bay restoration and protection. The leaders of the CBP Partnership, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2013, are developing a new Chesapeake Watershed Agreement outlining a series of goals and outcomes to guide conservation and restoration actions over the next decade. As one of the most studied ecosystems in the world, the CBP has a wealth of environmental and socioeconomic data to support this effort. To coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Partnership, we have been developing a range of data driven story maps to help communicate both technical and non-technical concepts relating to water quality, habitats and watersheds, sustainable fisheries, and public recreation opportunities throughout the Bay watershed. This presentation will highlight a few of those data-driven map stories, including cooperative visualization projects with both Stamen and ESRI.

    At 11:15am to 11:35am, Thursday 10th October

    In Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Imagery Painting in Maps

    by Bruce Daniel

    An expanding look at base imagery in maps. To date the advancement of map imagery has been defined by one factor: resolution. What about palette, atmosphere, texture and lighting? Once we get past "accurate" representation, what about evocative imagery that has a visual or emotional point of view? Techniques for imagery painting include use of additional Landsat bands (the "natural" color bands are only a subset of the tools we have at our disposal, IMHO); adding highlights and shadows generated from DEMs; using land cover data to apply texture in defined areas; using Lidar first return data to enhance edges and textures. Integrating aerial imagery into basemaps, moderating the need to choose between Standard, Satellite, or Terrain. Embracing imagery as a cartographic *design* tool can change the future look of maps.

    At 11:15am to 11:35am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • NEW: Building Land Cover Texels for Basemaps

    by Matthew Hampton

    The term ‘texel’ is borrowed from computer graphics lexicon and is a portmanteau of the words ‘texture’ and ‘pixel’ thus meaning – ‘textured pixel.’ Applying this term within the context of mapmaking can imply a type of ‘cartographic realism.’ This cartographic style utilizes light, shading and texture to more realistically depict map elements – typically natural landscape features. Starting with 30m landcover data, see how adding texture increases its 'resolution' and use at a variety of scales. This talk presents the process and technique used to create a ‘naturally’ textured basemap using land cover data in an automated cartographic workflow.

    At 11:15am to 11:35am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • Mapping the News

    by Jeff Larson

    Maps and news have long been best friends. At ProPublica, we have mapped everything from redistricting plans to flood maps. We've created our own mapping framework and have wrangled 100 of gigabytes of data to make 3d maps. Jeff will take you on a tour of ProPublica's maps.

    At 11:35am to 11:55am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • The Arabian Peninsula Symbolized on Maps, Medieval to Modern

    by Naeema Alhosani

    Until the modern era the people of the Arabian Peninsula had little need for maps and created few, since most of them depended on traditional knowledge of desert landmarks, the movements of the stars, and the directions of the winds for wayfinding. In contrast, Europeans created many maps of Arabia for various reasons ranging from intellectual curiosity to political, economic, and military interests. This paper trace sand seeks to explain the changing representation of the Arabian Peninsulaon maps from the medieval period to the modern day. It considers the historical development of map symbols, like writing, from pictures to conventional pictorial signs to abstract symbols.It looks at the differences between Arabian and European mapmakers and their underlying cultural biases.It explores how the maps were designed to serve different purposes. Out of this study of map symbolization emerges a multi-faceted view of the Arabian Peninsula and its history as seen through the eyes of many mapmakers, medieval to modern.

    At 11:35am to 11:55am, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • Thursday lunch provided

    NACIS business lunch, all encouraged to attend. New board members from the 2013 ballot announced.

    At 12:00pm to 2:00pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency C, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Achieving Aesthetics in Cartography

    by George F. McCleary, Jr.

    Arthur Robinson introduced, informally, a simple appraisal approach. He pointed out that when the map has “snap” … he snapped his fingers … in the initial visual appraisal, it “looks right.” There is nothing that is problematic in the visual impression … all of the pieces and parts are working together, and nothing assumes a position of inappropriate importance. If you explore the work in graphic arts, you find that such a map has “harmony” and “unity,” two of the basic principles of design (along with balance, contrast, emphasis, and more). Maps with “snap” have an aesthetic characteristic. In fact, much of the literature about aesthetics suggests that the aesthetic experience with an object occurs early in the human information processing activity … at the outset, before there is a “perceptual image” (Kosslyn) and definitely before the temporally and intellectually consuming consideration of the map within the cognitive process.

    At 2:00pm to 2:20pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • New Balls Please

    by Hans van der Maarel

    Several years ago Red Geographics was involved in the production of the Oolaalaa Globe Chairs. We are now working on a new set of maps for a similar product, using our experience as well as new datasets and software to make a better product.

    At 2:00pm to 2:20pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Questions Facing Map Design in the Age of Mobility and Siri

    by Ryan Mullins

    Mobile devices present distinct interaction and design challenges for cartographers and developers. As these technologies continue evolve, interaction will more easily be facilitated by multi-modal interfaces driven by a person's touch and voice, giving rise to new interface design questions. How do we design a symbol that visually cues a user to interact with it using touch or voice? How do we design an experience that smoothly transitions between touch and voice? In addition, there are important questions of symbol ambiguity and content accessibility that will drive not only how we design maps, but how people engage with and create content. I will discuss these questions, and examine how existing projects and future research are positioned to address them.

    At 2:00pm to 2:20pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • SESSION: Aesthetics, Emotion, Design

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Thursday 10th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

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