Sessions at NACIS 2013 on Friday 11th October Regular program

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  • CANCELED: MINI WORKSHOP: The Contemporary Web Mapping Application

    by Eric Theise

    This workshop will be a front-to-back-to-front-again examination of a contemporary approach to building web mapping applications. Moving briskly, we'll cover sources of open data (Natural Earth & OpenStreetMap), a client-side mapping library (Leaflet), tile creation (TileMill), and geospatial databases (PostgreSQL and PostGIS), as well as enhancements for performance and maintainability, such as TopoJSON, JavaScript model-view-controller frameworks, and tools and strategies for caching. Participants should be prepared to do some work in advance of the workshop--downloading recommended software and doing some background reading--and should bring a laptop to the workshop.

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Friday 11th October

    In Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • NEW ROOM: Small Cartography Shop Round Table

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Friday 11th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: New Visualizations for Old Data

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SPECIAL SESSION: Cartographies of the South (general)

    At 8:15am to 10:00am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Symbol Sharing Tools for Cartographers at NASA

    by Susan Hulsey

    NASA consists of ten specialty research centers that are located in eight states. Each center hosts GIS users who produce maps to support a wide variety of programs. Many areas have overlapping mapping needs within the agency, but one that requires consistent map design is emergency management mapping. Emergency maps are likely to be shared between NASA centers during disasters. The ability to standardize how an emergency is represented on maps in a timely manner is critically important. The Symbol Store is a web-based symbol sharing tool designed to help users discover, download, upload, and review point symbols. This presentation discusses recent extensions to the Symbol Store and the results of an evaluation with NASA mapmakers of new symbol reviewing tools. Using a task analysis and survey evaluation methodology with members of the NASA GIS users group, we hope to inform the next phase of Symbol Store development.

    At 8:15am to 8:40am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • The Civil War in Four Minutes

    by Valerie Krejcie

    "The Civil War in Four Minutes" follows the course of the war with moving battle lines ranging across a map of the eastern United States. Explosions occur to denote battles, and an "odometer of death" keeps a running total of Union and Confederate casualties as the war progresses. The presentation graphically illustrates war strategy, campaigns, and the high cost in human lives of the Civil War. I will provide background information on who was involved in developing the map for the museum and the public's response. The film is from the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield, IL.

    At 8:15am to 8:40am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage video

  • CANCELED: Mapping the Border War in Kansas, 1855-1856

    by Karen Cook

    This map represents the first step in a project to study the spatial and temporal patterns of bushwhacker raids in Territorial Kansas during the period Nov. 1, 1855-Dec. 1 1856. The data comes from Kansas Claims, a publicly available but little known document presented to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1861. This preliminary map locates the 183 damage claims made by residents of Douglas County, where Lawrence, a center of the anti-slavery movement, was a magnet for pro-slavery raiders from Missouri. The ultimate goal is to map all 487 Kansas claims and show not only the dates and dollar amounts of the claims but also the types of property destroyed or stolen. The resulting Internet-accessible map will be accompanied by biographical details about the victims, whose statements vividly evoke the hardships of frontier life. Such eye-witness accounts offer unique insights into early Kansas history.

    HISTORY: Abstract withdrawn at author's request on Sept. 4th.

    At 8:40am to 9:05am, Friday 11th October

    In Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • ArcGIS Bivariate Mapping Tools

    by Aileen Buckley

    Bivariate maps show two themes on the same map. The graphic marks used to represent the themes may be different, as with proportional symbols on a choropleth map, or they may be the same. Bivariate choropleth and bivariate point symbol maps fall into the latter category. Although ArcGIS does not have any out of the box tools to make these same-symbol bivariate maps, in this presentation I introduce a new set of tools that can be used to ease the compilation of these maps. Combined with standard tools, it is now easier and faster to make these bivariate maps in ArcGIS.

    At 8:41am to 9:04am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Kenneth Slessor, John Speed, and the “Southerne Sea”

    by Adele J. Haft

    Midway through composing his five-poem sequence The Atlas in 1930, Australian poet Kenneth Slessor suddenly wrote “Southerne Sea” in his journal (bit.ly/16wfIGK). He’d just chosen John Speed’s famous world map A New and Accurat Map of the World, 1651/1676, as the epithet of his fourth poem “Mermaids.” Unlike the cartographic epigraphs introducing the other poems, however, Speed’s map has little to do with “Mermaids”―a riotous romp through seas of fantastic creatures, and a paean to the maps that gave such creatures immortality. The map features a vast “Southerne Unknowne Land” and “Mar del Zur,” but no mythical beasties. And while it names “Southerne Sea” obliquely, in a legend, neither “Mermaids” nor The Atlas mentions Australia or “Southerne Sea.” Moreover, although Slessor’s sailors are “staring from maps in sweet and poisoned places,” it’s “portulano maps” that “Mermaids” describes. My paper retraces Slessor’s creative process to reveal why he chose Speed’s map.

    HISTORY: Moved to morning session (was afternoon) on 7 Sept 2013.

    At 8:41am to 9:04am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • CANCELED: Mapping the Future Patagonia National Park

    by Ross Donihue and Marty Schnure

    As we speak, a team of philanthropists, biologists, ecologists, and trail builders are hard at work creating the future Patagonia National Park in southern Chile. Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue, co-founders of Maps for Good, spent the 2013 austral summer in Patagonia collecting content to create maps that tell the unique story of the future park and its conservation mission. Learn about their expedition mapping this remote paradise on a shoestring budget out of a tent at the bottom of the earth.

    At 8:50am to 9:15am, Friday 11th October

    In Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Relating Hill Shading to Terrain Metrics

    by Patrick Kennelly and James Stewart

    Hill shading assigns shades of gray to terrain elements based on an illumination vector and the orientation of surfaces, which can be expressed in terms of slope and aspect. Surfaces with steeper slopes and aspects oriented away from the direction of illumination are generally hill shaded in darker shades of gray. Traditional hill shading , however, does not account for the elevation of surface elements, or the effect of nearby terrain elements. Using illumination throughout the sky (sky models) for hill shading results in surrounding terrain blocking some sky illumination, generally following the principle of “the less sky visible, the darker.” The resulting hill shadings show some correlation of shades of gray to elevation, as well as different patterns of shades of gray to slope and aspect.

    At 9:05am to 9:30am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • The Coast, contours, and Colors of Greenville

    by John Cloud

    NOAA is descended from the Coast Survey. Given the agency’s name, it may be surprising that the American south including Greenville has been the focus of some of the Survey’s best and most important cartography. This began with the Survey’s 1861 map of the distribution and density of slave populations in the slave-holding states, based on the suppressed data from the 1860 Census. Later, the Survey initiated a new map series of the terrain of the Confederacy east of the Mississippi, beginning with the Blue Ridge mountains immediately north of Greenville, based on the pioneering work of Arnold Guyot, the Swiss immigrant, first American geographer. In 1925 the Survey received responsibility for all civilian aviation mapping in the United States. One of the very first of these aeronautical charts presents Greenville in regional context on the eve of the modern era of highways and great changes in American life.

    At 9:05am to 9:55am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Storm Uncertainty Representation: User Responses to Novel Visualization

    by Jennifer Mason, jason dykes, Jo Wood and Aidan Slingsby

    Numerous existing hurricane visualizations represent spatial uncertainties (e.g. uncertainty in magnitude, the central track, etc.) that vary for different upcoming points in time. Several studies have evaluated current hurricane visualizations and found common misinterpretations among the general public. We present new hurricane visualizations that utilize existing data from the National Hurricane Center Database aiming to represent hurricane track and magnitude uncertainty in ways that make these misinterpretations less likely. This study evaluates these new designs and their effect on users including preferences, readability, and behavioral intention. The uncertainty visualizations are inspired by existing cartographic and uncertainty techniques with the goal of: 1) increasing the readability of maps so that users can more accurately identify and compare spatial uncertainties among different locations with increased confidence and 2) assessing how these visualizations impact user perceptions and behavioral intention for an approaching hurricane.

    At 9:30am to 9:55am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

    Coverage slide deck

  • "Congregational Watersheds" in Atlanta, 1928

    by Matthew Lawrence Pierce

    I propose a paper for NACIS 2013 on the Atlanta Maps Project and its potential use in congregational/religious studies. The Atlanta Maps Project of Woodruff Library at Emory University has recreated both the road network of and an absolute geocoder for Atlanta in 1928 based upon historic maps of the city owned by the library. My research combines the geocoder with church directories and census data in order to examine “congregational watersheds”—the area from which a congregation drew its membership. Determining a congregation’s watershed, in turn, allows us to analyze the impact of public and private transportation on church membership patterns. Because the first round of analyses uses five contiguous churches of the same denomination, the “boundaries”—both physical and social—between congregational watersheds may be determined. Incorporation of census data allows for a consideration of the relationship between social class and the size and density of congregational watersheds.

    At 10:15am to 10:40am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Exploratory visualization of movement patterns in Twitter data

    by Alexander Savelyev, Alan MacEachren and Alexander Savelyev

    The cartographic display of movement has a long history and has produced a number of well-known artifacts, including Minard’s flow maps and Hagerstrand’s space-time models. The volume of data associated with modern-day geospatial datasets makes many well-established movement visualization techniques impractical. Multiple new approaches have already been identified, including automated flow map construction, density mapping and edge bundling. However, good cartography depends as much on understanding the properties of data under investigation as it does on development of novel visualization approaches, and understanding millions of records of movement data presents a formidable challenge of its own. In this talk I attempt to address this challenge and will demonstrate a geovisualization environment that supports the free-form exploration of spatial movement patterns in large (millions of records) collections of Twitter data. The resulting environment combines small multiple technique, dynamic, user-controlled animation and on-the-fly filtering of movement data.

    At 10:15am to 10:40am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • MINI WORKSHOP: Projections – An Introduction to (or Refresher on) Map Projections

    by Daniel P. Huffman

    For many cartographers, novice and veteran alike, map projections remain a mysterious, confusing, and sometimes intimidating subject. We might know a few rules of thumb to help us make choices, but many of us don't always understand the reasoning behind them. Good mapmaking requires good projections, and knowing a bit more about how projections work makes it easier for us to make the right choice. In this short introductory course, we'll go over the basics of projections: their many varieties, properties, and parameters, and why all this stuff matters. It will put you on a solid footing to make smarter decisions in your next map, with a minimum of fuss and confusion.

    At 10:15am to 12:00pm, Friday 11th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: Big data and the crowd

    At 10:15am to 12:00pm, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SPECIAL SESSION: Cartographies of the South (Atlanta)

    At 10:15am to 12:00pm, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • ATLMaps - Building a research and community focused mapping platform

    by Jack Reed

    ATLMaps is a collaborative research and community focused mapping tool which aims to bring together disparate information types for visualization in a single web accessible experience. The platform integrates historical maps, user generated content, and quantitative information to provide new interactions and relationships for seemingly unrelated geospatial content.

    At 10:40am to 11:05am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Getting Rid of Consumers of Furry Pornography*, or How to Find Small Stories With Big Data

    by Ate Poorthuis

    Although the onset of Web 2.0 and the Geoweb has given geographers and cartographers a myriad of novel and rich spatial data sources, it remains a challenge to use that data in meaningful ways. Not helped by the limited capabilities of the early online mapping frameworks, many maps based on Geoweb data fall prey to xkcd’s pet peeve #208*: they are basically reflecting underlying population. Although this is not necessarily a problem, it often obscures much more interesting smaller spatial phenomena. Partly based on DOLLY, an ongoing effort to collect, analyze and visualize spatial big data in meaningful ways at the University of Kentucky, I present a methodology that allows one to visually tease out these smaller, interesting, spatial phenomena from large (millions of data points) spatial datasets in an interactive environment.

    At 10:40am to 11:05am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Crowdsourcing map data

    by Steve Spindler

    Steve Spindler Cartography created a crowdsourcing web application called WikiMapping to improve bike planning and make better bike maps. It doesn't have fancy graphics, but several bike planners use it daily to collect and process public input. Wikimapping is being used for city bike plans, bike share planning, and grassroots mapping for a gubernatorial campaign.

    Steve will demonstrate how a WikiMapping project improves his ability to help clients make better maps, communicate with constituents, and improve bicycle opportunities. Prior to the presentation, people are welcome to register and set up a project using WikiMapping.com so they can see how it functions.

    Links to some WikiMapping projects

    http://wikimapping.net/wikimap/C...
    http://wikimapping.net/wikimap/N...
    http://wikimapping.net/wikimap/H...

    At 11:05am to 11:30am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Enabling Spatial Narratives: The Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s – 1990s Collection

    by Joseph Hurley

    The Georgia State University Library provides students and researchers with material to tell compelling spatial narratives through a new and innovative digital collection of over 1900 historical Atlanta city planning maps, aerial photographs, publications, and unique demographic data. Designed as an educational digital humanities platform, “Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s – 1990s” is utilized in courses across a wide spectrum of disciplines including Geography, History, Sociology, Public Policy and English. With the goal of promoting innovative use of this material, the Planning Atlanta collection follows open data principles and provides free access to various file types, such as GeoTiffs, high resolution JPEGs, CSVs, and KMZ and PNG overlays. Built to be an interactive digital collection for research, educators, and the general public, the Planning Atlanta collection provides a vivid portrait of the city’s built environment and depicts structural conditions of buildings, segregated neighborhoods, and land use patterns.

    At 11:05am to 11:30am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Mapping with Communities in Atlanta, Georgia to Understand Sustainability

    by Timothy Hawthorne

    The growing subfield of community geography places explicit emphasis on identifying the spatial thinking and local knowledge that emerge from neighborhood residents’ experiences and seeks to affect positive community change in a variety of ways. As an integrated research and education framework dedicated to community-engaged scholarship and citizen science, the subfield holds much promise for developing a more inclusive and societal relevant discipline of geography. In this presentation, I discuss community geography as a way to broaden participation of under-represented groups in geographic research and to increase spatial knowledge production in local neighborhoods around Atlanta, Georgia. The talk focuses specifically on the development and implementation of participatory smart phone mapping applications and crowd-sourced mapping platforms to understand urban sustainability issues around Atlanta, Georgia.

    At 11:30am to 11:55am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Markets, Neighborhoods, and CartoDB

    by Nick Martinelli

    During the last year I have been using CartoDB to help me make some maps! It has been great fun and I would like to share some ways in which I have incorporated it into work and play projects over the last year. For work, CartoDB has facilitated the move to mobile friendly sites for our clients. An interesting speed bump for us was the loss of hover interaction on touch devices. I will discus our solution for that problem, and how, with CartoDB, we used it for a simple geo selection and market building tool. For fun, I used CartoDB to store and display data at a site I built to collect neighborhoods drawn by volunteer contributors in three Pacific Northwest cities. The site can be found at pnwmaps.com/neighborhoods. This was a really fun project, which was both a success and a failure. I'll talk about what worked, and what didn't collecting volunteer data, and the use of CartoCSS and CartoDB to live render neighborhoods nicely using what I called opacity stacks.

    At 11:30am to 11:55am, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • LUNCH BUNCH: Dine out with your favorite cartographers. (Signup, $)

    Optional, cheap and informal. There will be a list of ~10 famous cartographers to dine with. Meet in the hotel lobby and ambulate to a nearby restaurant for informal conversation over lunch.

    At 12:00pm to 2:00pm, Friday 11th October

    In Downtown Greenville, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • Cartography for a Changing Map

    by AJ Ashton

    Global online basemap design is hard: Taking into account display at multiple zoom levels, regional languages, unique geographical features, high and low density data, and tradeoffs between design and performance creates major challenges for the cartographer. And now, with fast growing and constantly improving sources of data like OpenStreetMap available the challenge, and opportunity, for living basemaps is expanding. This talk asks the question: what techniques can be used to design for changing data?

    At 2:00pm to 2:20pm, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • EnvisionTheJames.org: A National Geographic Living Atlas

    by Frank Biasi and David Lambert

    Overview of National Geographic's "Living Atlas" platform using the example of EnvisionTheJames.org. This multimedia publishing and engagement platform combines collections of interactive maps, articles, multimedia "geostories" and map-based "geopolls" to support an initiative to engage communities across Virginia's James River watershed in creating a collective vision for protecting, restoring, and promoting the region's natural and cultural heritage.

    At 2:00pm to 2:20pm, Friday 11th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • PANEL: Two Approaches to a Deep Map of Atlanta

    by Brennan Collins and Michael Page

    The concept of deep maps comes from a literary tradition focused on small rural areas, but new technologies in GIS and database driven interfaces allow for incredibly rich interdisciplinary explorations of cities. Two such projects are currently being built in Atlanta. Georgia State University’s ATLmaps project combines archival maps, geospatial data visualization, and multimedia location “pinpoints” to allow users to layer an increasing number of interdisciplinary data about Atlanta so that material can be cross-compared in novel ways. Emory’s Center for Digital Scholarship is developing an application similar to Google Maps for Atlanta from the late 1920s through the early 1950s that has the potential to change the way Jim Crow Atlanta is studied. In this panel, speakers will briefly explain these two projects and their different approaches to deep maps, and then discuss the ways schools can work together to create robust tools for university and community researchers.

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Friday 11th October

    In Regency F, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: Mapping Living Environments

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Friday 11th October

    In Redbud, Hyatt Regency Greenville

  • SESSION: On Web Maps: Multiscale and Radical

    At 2:00pm to 3:30pm, Friday 11th October

    In Regency D, Hyatt Regency Greenville

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