Sessions at SUNYLA 2013 on Thursday 13th June Session A-C

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  • Breakfast

    At 7:00am to 8:30am, Thursday 13th June

    In Residential Dining, Student Union at Buffalo State

  • Registration

    At 7:00am to 8:30am, Thursday 13th June

    In E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • Welcome and Keynote Speaker David Wiley 8:30AM - 10:00AM

    by David Wiley

    "Reclaiming Open: The Many Benefits of Truly Open Education"

    The term "open" has recently been co-opted by for-profit "MOOC"
    providers, much to the chagrin of open education advocates. What does
    "open education" really mean? Can it actually succeed in saving money?
    improving outcomes? empowering faculty? Come learn about the many
    benefits of truly open education and how you can get involved.

    At 8:30am to 10:00am, Thursday 13th June

    In Rockwell Hall Performing Arts Center, SUNY Buffalo State

    Coverage video

  • A12. Cataloging in RDA -- what to do?

    by Sandy Card, Kimmy Szeto, Maggie Horn, Daniel Kinney and Dave Ritchie

    RDA is upon us. What is it? How does RDA relate to AACR2rev, metadata, FRBR, ISBD, LC rule interpretations? What (hopefully few), principles should we know? Are there simple schemes which will allow us to survive, until things are clearer? (And clearer when? Would that be next year, 2014?), How will it change our cataloging? What are libraries doing? What do we need to do to manage the changes? What should we tell our cataloging staff? This program consists of short presentations, examples, practicalities -- and LOTS of discussion. Join us to discuss this watershed change in cataloging, and how we might manage RDA for our libraries.

    Highlights:

    • Principles necessary to using RDA.
    • Practical ways to continue cataloging and comply.
    • Hints for making the changes functional for all levels of cataloging staff.

    Facilitator:
    Dave Ritchie

    At 10:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 208, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A13. Social Networking for Professionals (SN4P)

    by Justina Elmore and Tracy Paradis

    Learn about how our social networking workshop has evolved over the past four years. Hear about how student feedback has reshaped our lesson. Join in a discussion about how professional networking has changed/will change in the future. We will share our own lesson plan for use as a template at your own institution. We highly suggest bringing your own laptop (or google doc friendly device).

    Highlights:

    • Learn about librarians' experience teaching professional social networking skills in our campus leadership program.
    • Learn strategies for using social networking tools to develop a professional web presence.
    • Adapt a lesson plan template for use at your own institution.

    Facilitator:
    Ken Fujiuchi

    At 10:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 314, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A14. A Tale of Two Repositories

    by Joshua Beatty and Kim Myers

    Libraries are steadily growing more engaged with issues of open access and scholarly communication. One result of this emphasis is that institutional repositories are becoming more popular even among colleges that emphasize teaching as well as research. Even at similar schools, and using the same platform, it is possible to take quite divergent approaches towards managing the repository. In this session, repository managers at SUNY Plattsburgh and The College at Brockport share their experiences in getting their repositories up and running, including staffing, workflows and content decisions. Pick the model that works for you!

    Highlights:

    • Two different models for staffing and populating an institutional repository
    • Ways in which to engage faculty and students in the work of the repository
    • Ways in which the library can begin taking on a new role as publisher

    Facilitator:
    Greg Toth

    At 10:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 316, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A15. Super Class: Creating Engaging One-Credit, Fully Online Library Classes with Online Tools

    by Steven Ovadia and Ann Matsuuchi

    Discussions about future classrooms set up a divide between virtual (MOOCs), and face-to-face instruction. We wish to present a new approach for facilitating faculty-student contact online that mirrors the traditional classroom. We have recently begun teaching LaGuardia Community College'€™s fully online Internet Research Strategies class using the Ning social network. Ning enables us to not only host the class, but to combine our individual classes into one '€œsuper class'€. In 2011, as part of a Verizon-funded initiative, we taught a super class, in which students who successfully completed the program received grades that far exceeded similar courses and showed improved performance on the post-course assessment.

    Highlights:

    • How to keep an online classroom engaged
    • How tools like Ning can create an environment encouraging student reflection
    • How collaborative teaching can be a richer experience for all

    Facilitator:
    Michelle Bishop

    At 10:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger W, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A16. SUNY's E-Textbook Opportunity: Lessons from a Collaborative Pilot

    by Dean Hendrix, Mary Jo Orzech and Charles Lyons

    Textbook publishers'€™ business practices including annual price increases work against financially strapped students. As a result, a majority of students decide against purchasing all of the necessary textbooks for their courses. This panel presentation will describe an IITG funded project initiated by three SUNY libraries (Brockport, Delhi and the University at Buffalo), to exploit SUNY'€™s '€œsystemness'€ and study the utility and feasibility of a coordinated e-textbook initiative across SUNY. During the Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters, the team specifically collected data in four areas: (1), the implementation of a multi-campus e-textbook initiative; (2), the effect of e-textbooks and their technological features on student learning, success, and satisfaction; (3), faculty feedback related to instructor satisfaction, pedagogy, customization and academic choice; and (4), our collective purchasing power, contract terms, necessary campus infrastructure, and sustainable business models for students, publishers and SUNY campuses.

    Highlights:

    • Opportunities and challenges of implementing e-textbooks in libraries and across SUNY
    • Extent of academic and financial benefits that e-textbooks deliver to SUNY students
    • Faculty attitudes and pedagogy related to e-textbooks

    Facilitator:
    Keri Thomas-Whiteside

    At 10:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 318, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A17. Be Kind - €”Unwind: Finals Week Stress Relief @ Your Library

    by Karen Gelles, Jennifer Drake, Carrie Fishner, Susan Lieberthal, Lauren Marcus, Kathleen Quinlivan and Pauline Shostack

    As Final Exams near, do you notice students acting a little stressed out? Academic stress is part of every college experience, but there are small steps that we in libraries can take to help students relax. Representatives from 7 SUNY campuses (including Community Colleges, Colleges of Technology, 4 Year Colleges, and a University Center), will discuss ‘stress-busting’€ activities taking place at their home campuses'€”both inside and outside of the library. Attendees will hear details about planning a variety of activities, from offering free refreshments to hosting therapy dogs, from yoga to raves. Each presenter will also discuss student feedback and participation levels, funding issues, obstacles, successes, failures, and lessons learned. Attendees will have ample time to ask questions and share their own experiences with helping students to unwind.

    Highlights:

    • What activities other libraries are doing for finals week stress relief
    • What details to consider when planning an event
    • What to expect in terms of participation and feedback

    Facilitator:
    Katherine Brent

    At 10:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger E, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A18a. Open SUNY Update

    by Carey Hatch

    This presentation will update the status of Open SUNY. The Chancellor'€™s Online Education Advisory Team completed an interim report last fall, and Open SUNY is now moving toward implementation. Named as the top priority in her State of the University address, the Chancellor has begun working with faculty and staff across the system to realize Open SUNY as the largest source of online learning in the country. Open SUNY will include new degree offerings in high need areas, consortia agreements that will enable students to take better advantage of increased course offerings, and new pathways for students to obtain credit for prior learning (including participation in MOOCs). Libraries and librarians have an opportunity to play an important role in supporting students and faculty within the Open SUNY environments, while also establishing a leadership position in the identification, creation and discoverability of Open Resources to support teaching and learning.

    Highlights:

    • The process used to define and implement Open SUNY
    • The role open education resources will play in supporting Open SUNY
    • The current status of implementation at this point in time

    Facilitator:
    Bonnie Swogger

    At 10:30am to 11:15am, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • A18b. Looking Towards the Future: A SUNY Library Director'€™s Panel

    by Maryruth Glogowski, Mark A. Smith, Jenica Rogers, Beth Orgeron, Michelle L. Currier and Nancy Williamson

    A panel of library directors within SUNY will discuss with attendees their perspectives on the future of academic libraries within SUNY. We have always been great examples of how systemness can work within SUNY. Are there other opportunities for us to collaborate? What does Open SUNY mean for SUNY libraries and how can we work together to improve access to information for SUNY students?

    Highlights:

    • Participants will be able to ask questions to some of the visionary members of SCLD
    • An open conversation about Open SUNY and the role SUNY libraries play
    • A better understanding of the vision of SCLD

    Facilitator:
    Tor Loney

    At 11:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • LUNCH

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Thursday 13th June

  • Poster Sessions and Vendor Social

    At 1:45pm to 3:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 147, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • WGIL SIG

    At 3:00pm to 3:30pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 204, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B21/C31. Why Google First? Developing Engagement with Institutional Services to Meet the Needs of Digital Visitors and Residents

    by Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Donna Lanclos and Erin M. Hood

    [Note: This presentation spans block B and C].
    Today, it is important for academic institutions to provide services that provide the best value for the most use. Institutionally-provided resources, such as those provided by libraries, often are not the academic community'€™s first choice, often choosing the more convenient, easier to use open-access sources. Findings of the 3-year, Visitors and Residents project that tracks US and UK participants shifts in motivations and forms of engagement with technology and information http://www.oclc.org/research/act... will be presented. Attendees will be asked to identify different ways of engaging the community in the use of technology, the web, institutionally-provided sources, and open-access sources. Their ideas and suggestions will be documented and shared. After the session, session outputs will be disseminated to the library and educational technology communities as part of a free toolkit. The toolkit will be promoted through blog and Facebook postings and twitter feeds.

    Highlights:

    • Research that identifies how the academic community engage with technology.
    • The 4 educational stages that can be used as a basis for conceptualizing, designing and positioning serves in the context of the open web.
    • How academic institutions can better engage the community in the use of institutionally-provided technology and resources.

    At 3:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger S, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B22. Digitizing Deliberately: The Digital Thoreau Project

    by Joe Easterly and Paul Schacht

    Digital Thoreau (http://digitalthoreau.org), aims to (1), produce TEI-encoded editions of works by H.D. Thoreau (beginning with Walden); (2), facilitate public engagement with Thoreau's work through social reading; and (3), educate students about digital humanities through semester and summer courses. The TEI-encoded text at the heart of the project incorporates annotations by late Thoreau scholar Walter Harding in an interface built on the Versioning Machine (http://v-machine.org), enabling readers to examine versions side by side and gain a better understanding of Thoreau's revisions and the work's development. In our presentation, we'll focus on our working methods - and associated challenges - in producing a fluid text edition with the Versioning Machine; our attempt to build a social reading edition of Walden by modifying Digress.it (and hosting a regional THATCamp on social reading); and the rewards and challenges of collaborating with traditional scholarly/public service organizations.

    Highlights:

    • Methods in faculty / librarian / student collaboration
    • Integrating active scholarly publishing projects into a classroom setting
    • Teaching with TEI

    Keywords: TEI, XML, Digital Scholarship, Digital Humanities, Pedagogy, Digital Editions, IITG, Grant-funded projects, Library/Faculty Relations, Embedded Librarianship, Publishing

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 316, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B23. Herding Cats or Time Management Techniquest for Public Services Librarian

    by Ray Morrison

    Trying to take on all the responsibilities that Public Services Librarians face each day can be as difficult as herding cats. Not only do these librarians deal with their department responsibilities, they also work at the reference desk, participate in collection development, provide library instruction, attend meetings and perform research. Participants will gain an understanding of the skills and techniques needed for time management in an academic library setting. They will learn why it is necessary to manage their time more effectively, what attitudes contribute to efficient (and inefficient!), use of time and strategies available to help them do more in the workplace, with their co-workers and administrators and with life outside the library. Many of the techniques shared have been garnered from a recent survey of academic librarians. By the end of the session, librarians should be able to discover ways to complete tasks that need to be accomplished.

    Highlights:

    • Learn new techniques in time management for their library position.
    • Share their tips and tricks to time management with others in the workshop.
    • Learn why it is necessary to manage their time more wisely.

    Facilitator:
    Amy Glende

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 318, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B24. Development of a Knowledge Base for Incorporating Technology into Courses

    by Logan Rath

    This project resulted from a group of Faculty at the College at Brockport who wanted to create a Web site for best practices in teaching and technology. The project evolved into a knowledge base powered by WordPress. A subset of solutions were created to show the power of categories, tags and other taxonomies. This presentation will discuss the process of the project, and updates on deploying the site to campus.

    Highlights:

    • How to develop a similar site at one's campus.
    • The powerful, extensible nature of WordPress as a Web site.
    • Lessons learned from this project.

    Facilitator:
    Mary Timmons

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 314, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B25. Energizing the One-Shot: Blending Unique Activities and Multimedia to Create Dynamic Library Session

    by Johanna MacKay

    Explore a library session for freshmen students, which focuses on copyright, fair use, and the public domain. Learn how a lecture-based presentation can become dynamic with the combination of multimedia, unique activities, learning objects and even PowerPoint slides, creating a one-shot library session that engages students to critically think about a topic that directly impacts their personal and academic lives.

    Highlights:

    • How to incorporate multimedia seamlessly within a library session.
    • How to create unique activities that stimulate student's critical thinking.
    • How to use a topic like copyright to relate Information Literacy skills to students' personal and academic lives.

    Facilitator:
    Justina Elmore

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B26. Attitudes towards and uses of electronic books at Alfred University

    by Ellen Bahr, Brian Sullivan and Fang Wan

    The Libraries of Alfred University (AU), are conducting a survey to assess the usage of and attitudes towards electronic books among AU faculty, staff, and students. We will gather information about our users’™ knowledge and acceptance of electronic books; their awareness of the Libraies'€™ electronic book collections; their reading habits in terms of materials format; their preferences about book content in electronic format as opposed to print; and their thoughts about role of electronic books in the future. The results from the survey will help the Libraries to understand the preferences of the AU community and will assist with future purchasing decisions at the AU Libraries. This presentation will place the AU survey within the larger context of the role of electronic books in today'€™s collection development plans, touching on topics such as the role of patron drive acquisitions (PDA), programs and the future of print.

    Highlights:

    • What is the attitude of library users (students, faculty and staff), towards using electronic books?
    • What can libraries do with our collection development plans based on patrons' preferences?
    • What is the future of library collections in terms of materials format?

    Facilitator:
    Mike Curtis

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger E, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B27. Getting Undergrads into the Archives: Innovative Outreach at SUNY Potsdam

    by Matt Francis and Elizabeth Andrews

    Like other academic institutions Potsdam has a College Archives & Special Collections filled with valuable historical materials that are available to researchers of all levels. Unfortunately, despite the college'€™s focus on undergraduate research, few students take advantage of these resources. In an effort to increase awareness and usage by this important audience, the college archivist and outreach librarian recently teamed up to create a targeted, yearlong promotional campaign that included the creation of a new archives research award, events for student groups, and increased visibility of historic materials through physical displays and social media outlets. Additionally, we renovated the archives reading room in order to create a more welcoming environment for prospective researchers. This session will focus on the importance and difficulty of effectively promoting archives to undergraduates; we'€™ll also examine the qualitative and quantitative data that helped us evaluate the success of the recent outreach campaign.

    Highlights:

    • How to combine smaller outreach efforts into a sustained publicity campaign.
    • Develop your understanding of undergraduate perspectives on archives and special collections.
    • Be exposed to the variety of evaluation techniques used to assess outreach campaigns.

    Facilitator:
    Karen Gelles

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger W, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B28. Innovative Instruction Technology Grant Initiative Report

    by Lisa Stephens

    The '€œPower of SUNY'€ has been vigorously reinforced with the first round of Innovative Instruction Technology Grants! Individual project outcomes from the inaugural round are being reported out at CIT 2013. When Provost Lavallee and Chancellor Zimpher announced the awards just over one year ago, the vision for IITG was to inspire faculty and staff to leverage expertise across multiple campuses and build new bridges for adopting technology-enhanced solutions in service of pedagogy. This presentation will focus on IITG'€™s at the program level, highlighting some individual projects that illustrate themes demonstrating significant innovation within SUNY.

    Highlights:

    • The positive impact IITG's are having across SUNY
    • How to leverage collaboration outside of campus boundaries to support research projects
    • What to expect when applying for a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant

    Facilitator:
    Kim Hoffman

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 208, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • B29. EBSCO Discovery, EBSCO ebooks and Source Databases

    by Jim Kropelin and Amy Levine

    Join EBSCO to learn more about EBSCO Discovery Service. We will demonstrate how EDS searches more of your library’s content from a single search box, providing exceptional results for your end users. We will also explain the new EBSCO eBook subscription and purchase options, and review the very popular Patron Driven Acquisition program. Lastly, we will provide an overview of our new Source databases, which include both Wilson's and EBSCO's best content rolled into one easy-to-search resource.

    Highlights:
    * Discovery
    * ebooks
    * Source Databases

    Facilitator:
    Carol Anne Germain

    At 3:30pm to 4:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 210, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C32. Designing Library Publishing Services: a use case for development of an open journal publishing platform

    by Kate Pitcher

    Geneseo is working on the creation and implementation of a library publishing infrastructure, along with the development of expertise and knowledge in various publishing platforms and workflow. The design of library publishing services means new opportunities for traditional, alternative and open access publishing formats, but also requires best practices, sustainable business models and cultivation of collaborators and partners. This presentation will demonstrate a use case for publishing infrastructure, and will focus on one of our publishing platforms and service models as example: open journal publishing. Geneseo submitted an IITG grant to pilot the development of a scalable and system-wide model for open access journal publishing, in collaboration and partnership with SUNY faculty and libraries, using the Public Knowledge Project'€™s (PKP), Open Journal Systems (OJS), platform. In addition, the pilot attempts to develop new scholarly communication services and expertise across SUNY, while developing and documenting best practices for library journal publishing.

    Highlights:

    • Several key strategies for designing their own library publishing service models.
    • How they can collaborate and contribute to the open journal publishing pilot project.
    • Gain practical knowledge about developing best practices documentation for publishing projects.

    Facilitator:
    Wendy West

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 316, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C33. We need a Creative Commons expert, and you're it. Congratulations! Here's what you need.

    by Sarah Morehouse

    Libraries create content, and it often makes sense to make it available to everyone throughout SUNY and the world, not only to use, but to copy, share, adapt, and remix for their own purposes. In addition, as word about Open SUNY and Open Educational Resources spreads, faculty, staff, and students will increasingly come to us asking questions about how they can do this themselves. Here are the answers you need. You'll also get some informational materials you can share with your community.

    Highlights:

    • Learn the kinds of Creative Commons licenses there are and what the permissions and restrictions are for each kind
    • When you can put a Creative Commons license on your own work, and how to do it
    • How to find open (that is, Creative Commons licensed), works and how to use them without voiding the license

    Facilitator:
    Karen Gelles

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 208, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C34. Adding SMS Service to a Discovery System

    by Juan Denzer

    Many Libraries use SMS service to allow users to send call numbers from the Library'€™s discovery system to their mobile phones. The problem is that libraries use email to sms gateways. Users are required to enter their carrier, which is cumbersome. And sometimes certain pay-as-you-go services are not listed. A better implementation would be to have users just enter their mobile number. This session will show librarians how to implement a true SMS gateway using Google Voice or any other SMS gateway that has an API. The discovery system that will be demonstrated is Aleph. In this session you will learn how to implement a SMS gateway relay server. You will learn how to configure the Aleph front end using only javascript, HTML, and CSS.

    Highlights:

    • Be able to add SMS to Aleph or any other existing catalog or discovery system
    • Be able to implement Google Voice or any other sms gateway with API
    • Be able to customize your SMS overlay using Javascript and CSS

    Facilitator:
    Alvin Dantes

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 314, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C35. Tech-Savvy Tutorials: Teaching Critical Research Practices via Blackboard

    by Caryl Ward and Benjamin Andrus

    A survey of faculty and TAs confirmed that undergraduates at Binghamton need assistance with research. The knowledge, expertise and training of librarians has been leveraged by creating a series of library tutorials that instructors can assign to their students. They have visual, audio, gaming and subtitle components in order to address multiple learning styles.
    In this session, we will discuss collaboration with teaching faculty, the process of identifying topics, and integration into Blackboard. Audience members will be invited to brainstorm new ways to market library instruction to faculty.

    Highlights:

    • How to convince teaching faculty to include library instruction in course curricula.
    • How to select relevant topics in information literacy.
    • How to integrate interactive tutorials into course management systems.

    Facilitator:
    Amy Glende

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C36. Discuss Amongst Yourselves: Journal Clubs are they useful?

    by Anne Larrivee

    Journal clubs provide an opportunity for a practical conversation to begin. Without this conversation silos of information get trapped in the places where they should be spread the most, within the library. This presentation will provide an overview of how Binghamton University Libraries Journal Club was setup, its reasons for being, and plans for the future. The presenter will point out challenges to consider but also emphasize the observed benefits. A research analysis and comparison of journal clubs within other libraries will provide a through understanding of all the different approaches to organizing a journal club. Anyone who has ever thought about starting a journal club or has helpful input from their own experience is encouraged to attend.

    Highlights:

    • Understand the purpose of starting a journal club.
    • Determine which approach to journal clubs seems to be the most effective.
    • Learn how to start and promote a journal club.

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In BUTL 318, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C37. Everyone Has a Story to Share: Hosting a Human Library Event

    by Pauline Shostack

    Human Library events (http://humanlibrary.org), are taking place all over the world as a means of bringing communities together to share diverse experiences, challenge stereotypes, and encourage understanding. Event participants have an opportunity to borrow and engage in conversation with a '€œHuman Book.'€ '€œHuman Books'€ are volunteers who are willing to share their stories with others in a safe environment. At Onondaga Community College, we hosted a Human Library event during the Spring 2013 semester. We partnered with a variety of academic and administrative departments, student clubs, and even a local public library. This resulted in an overwhelming response to the event in terms of participants and '€œHuman Book'€ volunteers. This presentation will provide an overview of why we hosted this type of community program, and tips for planning and evaluating your own Human Library event.

    Highlights:

    • Why they may want to consider hosting a Human Library event.
    • Strategies for planning their own Human Library event
    • Evaluate a Human Library type event

    Facilitator:
    Carrie Fisher

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger E, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • C38. Empire Shared Collection: open your mind to a shared tomorrow, today

    by Jennifer Smathers and Nicole Colello

    A last copy repository is a long-range, cost-effective means to conserve valuable library resources by reducing unwanted duplication of, and long-term costs to shelve and care for, print materials that are seldom used but have value.
    Learn how the University at Buffalo, Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo State, and The College at Brockport, supported by WNYLRC and 2012/2013 RBDB grants, are collaborating to make a shared last copy repository a reality today.

    Highlights:

    • About the advantages of a last-copy repository
    • How efficient delivery to their patrons from remote storage can be
    • How to join this unique Academic/Public Library collaborative effort

    Facilitator:
    Susan Perry

    At 4:30pm to 5:15pm, Thursday 13th June

    In Bulger W, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

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