Sessions at SUNYLA 2013 on Friday 14th June Session D-F

View as grid

Your current filters are…

  • Breakfast

    At 7:00am to 8:30am, Friday 14th June

    In Residential Dining, Student Union at Buffalo State

  • Registration

    At 7:00am to 12:00pm, Friday 14th June

    In E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D41. We’re Listening: Library Assessment, Creative Outreach, and Infographic

    by Eugene Harvey and Katherine Bertel

    In fall 2012, E. H. Butler Library (Buffalo State), implemented their triennial LibQUAL+(R), the nationally-normed survey developed by the ARL to gauge users' perceptions of library service. With a goal to improve survey response rate, an Assessment Librarian teamed up with a Communications Librarian to create a comprehensive plan for marketing and outreach. With minimal funding, these individuals utilized desktop publishing tools, social networking, prize incentives, and campus outreach to entice over 550 students and faculty members to complete the survey. Their collaborative efforts resulted in the second-highest number of campus respondents since 2003. Following completion of the survey and analysis of data, free infographic design tools were used to creatively present selected results to the Buffalo State community. Join Eugene Harvey and Katie Bertel as they summarize their experiences, share ideas for creative dissemination of data and outcomes, and inspire renewed interest in assessment and evaluation.

    Highlights:

    • Creative marketing and outreach ideas for library assessment.
    • Innovative methods for presenting survey data.
    • The connection of systematic assessment to library strategic planning.

    Facilitator:
    Wendy West

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D42. Best Practices for Library Publishing: the Library Publishing Toolkit

    by Kate Pitcher and Allison Brown

    In 2012, several university libraries issued a research report entitled "Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success", which outlines several important recommendations for how libraries can develop publishing services, specifically emphasizing the need for definition and development of best practices for these publishing strategies. Our presentation will introduce the audience to the Library Publishing Toolkit, a grant-funded project which is identifying, examining and curating opportunities for content creation and distribution in public and academic libraries. The presentation will report on project outcomes, including survey results and a preview of the forthcoming open access e-book. The Library Publishing Toolkit will serve as an essential guide and set of strategies for libraries of various types to get started or improve efficiency with publishing services.
    The Library Publishing Toolkit is sponsored by Rochester Regional Library Council (RRLC), 2013 Incubator funding and is a joint effort of SUNY Geneseo and the Monroe County Library System.

    Highlights:

    • Learn about the Library Publishing Toolkit's purpose and goals.
    • Learn how they can contribute to the next edition of the Library Publishing Toolkit.
    • Take suggested use cases & strategies back to home institutions for conversation with colleagues about library publishing strategies & best practices.

    Facilitator:
    Charles Lyons

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 316, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D43. Altmetrics: Assessing Research in the Online Academy

    by Dean Hendrix

    As scholarly communications increasingly occur on the web, data from the social networks, repositories and online research tools, known as altmetrics, have the potential to describe different dimensions of research impact outside of traditional citation analysis. In this presentation, I will introduce altmetrics, the tools to collect them, and their potential impact on peer review, scholarship and the open access movement. To close, I will report on my in-progress research which employs principal components analysis (PCA), a multivariate statistical technique, to analyze article-level data from two journals, PLoS Medicine and the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA), with the goal of characterizing associations between individual altmetrics indicators and citation metrics.

    Highlights:

    • The scope and definition of altmetrics
    • The potential impacts of altmetrics on scholarly communications
    • Current altmetrics research

    Facilitator:
    Kim Myers

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 318, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D44. Does the library work with my mobile device?

    by Heather Shalhoub

    Due to a need based on questions from students and faculty, a mobile device inventory project was started. A review of other libraries was done and then an inventory of all mobile help documentation from vendors was compiled. After information was gathered, items were tested on available mobile devices. All of this information was put together to create what is now the Empire State College Library's "Using the Library with Mobile Devices" website. The site contains tips for using mobile devices with library resources, links to available apps and links to all mobile device support information for the online collection.

    Highlights:

    • How Empire State College manages the needs of users with mobile devices without supporting those devices
    • What mobile device support and apps are available for SUNY-wide online library resources
    • Different ways users can access library resources via mobile devices

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 314, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D46. The Stubborn E-book: Discussion of E-books and Interlibrary Loan Accessibility

    by Anne Larrivee and Logan Rath

    In the past few years e-book collections have pushed their way into libraries throughout the world. Trends of e-book package deals, ease of purchase, and distance student demands are just a few of the persuasive reasons why libraries are increasing their purchase of e-book packages. However, as e-book collections increase what does this mean for SUNY libraries'€™ interlibrary loan lending programs? During this session a panel of librarians within the SUNY system will come together to discuss what this trend will mean for interconnectedness of the SUNY libraries and possibilities for the future.

    Highlights:

    • Increase knowledge of current practices
    • Discuss barriers of interlibrary loan and ebooks
    • Share thoughts on remedying this problem

    Facilitator:
    Karen Gelles

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger S, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D47. Bracketology: Tips for a March Madness Style Bracket at Your Library

    by Alvin Dantes

    In October of 2012 Oneonta promoted Banned Books Week with a March Madness style bracket to find Oneonta's favorite banned book. Each week, patrons were encouraged to vote on match ups until a winner was decided. Brackets were also available that patrons could fill out to win prizes. The culminating event was the Banned Book Read-in during banned books week where patrons could read from their favorite banned book and where the bracket winner was announced.
    This presentation will describe how SUNY Oneonta librarians and staff managed this bracket and tips for creating your own brackets for your own libraries.

    Highlights:

    • How to create a march madness bracket
    • How to create polls to determine match ups
    • How to promote library events

    Facilitator:
    Tina Chan

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger E, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D48. Developing a System-Wide Metaliteracy Collaborative Creating a Unified Vision of Metaliteracy Across the SUNY System

    by Christian Poehlmann

    This program describes exploratory initiatives that promote Metaliteracy and emerging frameworks for information literacy among a wide range of constituencies at the State University of New York. This Innovative Instruction Technology Grants (IITG), funded initiative tackles methods for infusing Metaliteracy throughout students' academic careers, opening dialogues among different educational groups, and exploring issues such as learning analytics, the creation of a badging system, and the semantic web.

    Highlights:

    • Development of open educational resources supporting metaliteracy
    • Role of badging as a signifier of metaliteracy/transliteracy learning
    • Developing metaliteracy/transliteracy learning objectives

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger W, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • D49. Faculty, Students, & Library Instruction: The Quest for Usage

    by Nanette Frost and Stacey Knibloe

    Libraries spend precious dollars on electronic and digital material to support faculty and students. How are faculty and students using these resources to support their classes and research? What are creative ways instructional librarians are reaching out to them to meet their needs? This panel discussion will look at the topic from the viewpoint of each constituent and provide insight and best practices for higher usage statistics. Discussion with the audience is encouraged.

    • Best Practices working with faculty to drive usage.
    • Best Practices working with students to drive usage.
    • What your publisher can do to support your needs.

    Facilitator:
    Amy Glende

    At 9:00am to 9:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 210, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • Archives Special Interest Group

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Friday 14th June

    In E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • E51. Five Ways to Inspire your Library’s Tomorrow, Today

    by Micquel Little and Kate Ross

    Academic libraries are learning how to demonstrate their value via evidence based assessment. This is a complex process for the long term road ahead, which is currently under heavy construction. In the meantime, this presentation will guide you through thinking about practices you are currently performing and how to evaluate them in order to provide a more immediate overview of your value and support of academic learning on your campus. Lavery Library has chosen five areas of service to share during this presentation. These five areas each demonstrate a different influence the library has on facilitating learning. They also demonstrate trends within the library which inform decisions for change as well as value sound bites to be shared with stakeholders. Learn how to take a creative and inspiring approach to the services you provide your patrons and show your library'€™s value at the same time!

    Highlights:

    • Gain an understanding for potential of current services.
    • How to creatively use statistics to inform decisions and demonstrate value.
    • How to relate every day and current services provided to support and value for academic learning.

    Facilitator:
    Eugene Harvey

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • E52. Technical Services Special Interest Group (SIG)

    by Marianne Muha and Susan Perry

    Marianne and Susan will host an open discussion of "hot topics" in Technical Services. Thinking about RDA? Discovery services? One bib record across SUNY? We are too. We want to hear where you've been and where you're headed. Participants will bring their own discussion topics, helping to set the agenda. This session is open to all librarians, in any department, willing to share ideas, challenges, solutions and questions with colleagues in cataloging, acquisitions, serials, resource sharing, systems. We may not have all the answers, but chances are someone else in the room will!

    Highlights:

    • What are the current issues within Technical Services?
    • How do the workflows in my department affect others in the library?
    • What is the best way for librarians to share problems/solutions with other libraries?

    Facilitator:
    Susan Perry

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger S, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • E53. Using Gimlet to Impact Reference Communication in Your Library

    by Tina Chan and Kathryn Johns-Masten

    Penfield Library at SUNY Oswego uses Gimlet to track and record reference questions. Come to our session to learn about how we use this data to make library staffing and collection development decisions. Gimlet can be used as a communication tool to keep librarians and social media followers informed. We will also tell you about creative ways to use the information to improve productivity and service to users.

    Highlights:

    • How to use data from Gimlet
    • Challenges and benefits of capturing reference statistics.
    • Ways to improve communication using Gimlet

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 314, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • E54. Engaging students through emerging technologies

    by Jessica Clemons

    There is a growing need to promote digital literacy as well as information literacy in library information classes. Faculty can assume that students already know how to use '€œtechnology'€ but often times they don'€™t know how to use hardware or software or they don'€™t understand how it works. Librarians at SUNY-ESF used iPod touches in the classroom to encourage free exploration of the library, from its physical collection and spaces to its people and online resources. Part of the exercise was to show students that it is okay if they do not currently know all about iPods or the library. Students are in the classroom is to learn and share their knowledge. This activity was a jumping off point to engage students in an information journey.
    This program was made possible through a SUNY IITG grant program. I will provide assessment data that I gathered for the program.

    Highlights:

    • An effective way to engage students in library orientation
    • Library instruction can be adapted to encourage new teaching styles (you don't have to start from scratch)
    • That creating an open, encouraging environment is important

    Facilitator:
    Elizabeth Andrews

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger E, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • E55. Making sense of UN open data for business and social science library instruction

    by Justina Elmore

    Finding and using global data is becoming increasingly important in many fields, including the social sciences. This session explores the data available from the various United Nations (UN), data sources. Learn about the nuances of navigating these resources through the lens of providing library instruction for the social sciences.

    Highlights:

    • Discover the benefits of using UN open data for business and social science classes
    • Understand what type of data is available
    • Learn about the functionality and interoperability of UN sources

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 316, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

    Coverage slide deck

  • E56. Meet Them Where They Are: Patron-Driven Ebooks in a Multi-Type Consortia

    by Kate Cunningham-Hendrix, Joe Riggie and Jennifer Smathers

    Ebooks are assisting SUNY libraries in meeting needs of disparate user levels and geographies. For all libraries, the landscape of ebook access models, content choices and platforms are changing with exponential speed. Simultaneously, library budgets continue to decrease. How can we keep up with this rapid change, make fiscally sound decisions and provide users with what they need as they need it?; provide content to geographically distributed SUNY users? The NY3Rs have been exploring patron-driven acquisition (PDA), of ebooks in a consortial framework as a way to address some of these issues and amidst other experimental content and access models. Hear several SUNY colleagues across the state and SUNY sectors share their experiences with one of the only programs created to provide ebooks on demand in a multi-type consortia. Can a PDA model be used to build a sustainable shared collection, and provide content to geographically distributed SUNY users?

    Highlights:

    • Models for licensing electronic collections in a demand-driven environment
    • New ways to share collections and access across SUNY sectors and library types
    • Options for negotiating lending models and price points with vendors, particularly ebook vendors

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger W, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • E57. Change and Creativity in the Curriculum Materials Center

    by Lisa Czirr

    Library learning spaces must constantly adapt to remain relevant to their users. This is especially true within Curriculum Materials Centers (CMCs), specialized library collections that serve the faculty and students of Education programs. The Teaching Materials Center (TMC), at SUNY Cortland has been reaching out to its users through focus groups and surveys in order to determine their needs. An examination of similar CMCs has also been conducted, exploring the trends within these centers. Particular interest has been paid to their web presences and the services that they offer. The TMC will become even more user-centered in the future, based on the findings of these studies. Among these changes are a more accessible web presence, updated instruction sessions, and the addition of a creative space within the TMC. The creative space in particular will encourage the hands-on processes of lesson planning, and promote an active engagement with the collection.

    Highlights:

    • The current trends in Curriculum Materials Centers, particularly focusing on how CMCs are influenced by changes in teacher education.
    • The process of updating a specialized area within a library- from simple, immediate changes to longer-term plans.
    • Ways in which a library's collection can become more "hands-on", through adapting the creative "makerspace".

    At 10:00am to 10:45am, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 318, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F61. How Usability Testing Shapes the Future of a Library

    by Patrick Patterson

    With libraries serving as vibrant communities we share knowledge and information with people through a variety of different ways and most of them are in electronic formats. As we look at creative ways to provide people with the information they need it requires us to understand how they interact and use a libraries website. By understanding how people search and look for information electronically helps us create usable interfaces; Thus, allowing us to explore future endeavors that remove the barriers that get in the way. This presentation will focus on the process and the things that were learned along the way. Usability testing is about watching people actually try to use something that we are building, so we can detect and fix the parts that confuse or frustrate them. It also allows you to understand how library patrons search for information.

    Highlights:

    • How to conduct a usability study
    • How the data you collect can improve library services
    • Impact on future decisions

    Facilitator:
    Matt Francis

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger E, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F63. Improving Student Learning at the Reference Desk? Taking Notes During Reference Transactions

    by Bonnie Swoger and Kimberly Davies Hoffman

    During the Fall 2011 semester Geneseo surveyed students after reference transactions to ask them '€œWhat did you learn during your meeting with the librarian?'€ Based on student responses, we identified some areas for improvement and set out to close the loop on our assessment. After a pilot phase at the end of the Fall 2012 semester, we implemented a system for taking notes during reference transactions in Spring 2013. Librarians recorded the keywords, search strategies and resources discussed during the transaction. The library kept a copy of this page of notes for later analysis and the student was able to take a copy with them. At the same time, we repeated our survey of student learning, and asked students if they found the pages of notes useful. We will discuss our survey results, our analysis of the notes taken, and librarians'€™ thoughts about the note-taking strategy.

    Highlights:

    • Strategy developed by Geneseo for taking notes at the reference desk
    • Text coding techniques used to analyze the notes taken
    • Research skills students felt they learned during a reference transaction

    Facilitator:
    Amy Glende

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger W, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F64. Refocusing Emerging Technologies on the Patron

    by Emily Thompson

    The position of an Emerging Technologies Librarian often works more closely with technical services than with the patrons. At SUNY Oswego, we have re-imagined this position as the "Learning Technologies" Librarian, someone who seeks out new technologies and teaches classes in how to use them. In addition, this person also provides a valuable resource as students (and faculty), navigate the waters of multimedia assignments.

    Highlights:

    • Students appreciate having a resource to turn to when they have a multimedia project
    • Faculty are more willing to give innovative assignments when they know the have support
    • A librarian who is actively seeking out new applications and technology helps his or her library stay on the cutting edge.

    Facilitator:
    Kathleen Quinlivan

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger S, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F65. Information Literacy + Blackboard = A great way to reach on and off campus student!

    by Jane Verostek

    Wondering how to teach information literacy completely online using Blackboard.
    Come to this session to see how SUNY ESF has been using Blackboard since 2009 to teach a 5 week 1 credit information literacy course. Our online course is taught to students during the regular semesters/on campus and during the summer to remote/distance students. This presentation will show real world examples from the class and will give steps on how to set up and organize the course within Blackboard. Ideas on how to get the students excited and involved in class blogs will also be given. Helpful online links and tips for different research tools will be also given with regards to teaching about library catalogs, serial literature databases, the Internet and creating bibliographies.

    Highlights:

    • How to use and setup and organize a course in Blackboard.
    • Seeing a real information literacy course taught in Blackboard.
    • Ideas for getting students involved in online classes and links to resources to use in an online information literacy course.

    Facilitator:
    NJ Wolfe

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 316, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F66. DCC@MCC Learning Commons Flip

    by Katherine Jenkins and Mary Timmons

    The Damon City Campus Library and the Electronic Learning Center at Monroe Community College has merged in name and in physical space into DCC Learning Commons in August 2012. participants will learn what changes we made to our physical space to enhance the learning needs of the students. As a result of the makeover, we received high compliments for all that we have done to improve the space.
    Learn what we did to make it work and the lessons learned from this experience!

    Highlights:

    • Practical tips for integrating traditional library with electronic learning center.
    • Learn focus group tips.
    • Open discussion on lessons learned.

    Facilitator:
    Nancy Kennedy

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 314, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F67. IL Fox '€“The Information Literacy Virtual Toolbook'€“ Research Process

    by Tor Loney, Carole Anne Germain and John Pardavila

    This presentation focuses on an IITG-funded project which entailed conducting preliminary research into the development of IL Fox, an online toolbook to promote information literacy and digital fluency. Currently, no comprehensive reference source exists to support students'€™ information literacy needs. This tool was designed to fill a void for students as well as faculty at the statewide, national, and international levels.
    The presentation includes an introduction to the grant, the goals of IL Fox, the research process, and intended next steps of the project. The researchers will outline the challenges and rewards of this research endeavor, including identification of experts and appropriate technological requirements for implementation. They will share their findings and offer insights for undertaking similar projects. In addition, they will discuss opportunities for SUNYLA member collaborations and extend a call for participants to join in the next phase of the project.

    Highlights:

    • Awareness of the IITG grant process, from the Tier One call through the opportunity to apply for the second phase of the IITGs.
    • Discover the intricacies of creating an online educational resource '€“ from a simple idea to the complex reality.
    • Developing collaborations, IT tools, and interface/usability strategies.

    Facilitator:
    Keri Thomas-Whiteside

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In BUTL 318, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

  • F68. “That was then, this is now:” Transforming Shared Services

    by Maureen Zajkowski, Sandy Card, Marianne Muha, Maggie Horn, Angela Rhodes and Cindy Francis

    In 2000 when the Aleph migrations were first underway, John Edens from the University at Buffalo, wrote '€œas opportunities for distance learning increase, students and faculty will need to view themselves as part of SUNY, not just part of one SUNY unit. As the number of electronic resources available to all of SUNY increases and lesser used print material moves out of individual libraries and into SUNY storage facilities, access to these resources and holdings needs to be through the union catalog.'€ Flash forward to April 2012 when the library directors from the Comprehensive Colleges, Colleges of Technology, and Community Colleges requested that OLIS develop a shared catalog. As a result, a taskforce was created to consider the impact of workflow in a shared environment. This session will highlight the recommendations of the Shared Cataloging and Authorities Task Force and present the benefits of a shared environment.

    Highlights:

    • Opportunities resulting from developing a shared cataloging environment
    • Challenges in developing a shared environment
    • Challenges in not developing a shared environment

    Facilitator:
    Angela Rhodes

    At 11:30am to 12:15pm, Friday 14th June

    In Bulger N, E. H. Butler Library, SUNY Buffalo State

Schedule incomplete?

Add a new session

Filter by Day

Filter by coverage

Filter by Topic

Filter by Venue