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USETDA 2013 schedule

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Wednesday 24th July 2013

  • Registration & Vendor Fair

    On-site registration and the vendor materials will be available all day in the Claremont McKenna College Kravis Center, Lower Court 63.

    At 7:30am to 4:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Breakfast

    Breakfast will be available to pick-up from Scripps Malott Hampton Room (15A).

    At 8:00am to 9:00am, Wednesday 24th July

    In Scripps Hampton Room, The Claremont Colleges

  • Workshop: Copyright and Authoring Issues for ETD Professionals

    Located in Claremont McKenna College Kravis Center, Lower Court 62.

    Presented by Gail Clement, Outreach Librarian and Associate Professor, Digital Services & Scholarly Communication, University Libraries, Texas A&M University

    This highly interactive workshop focuses on the copyright and authoring issues encountered by stakeholders in the ETD submission, management and publication process. Building on copyright essentials such as copyright ownership and inclusion of third party works in the ETD (which were covered in the USETDA 2012 pre conference session, this program will consider additional questions such as ownership of copyright in multi-authored articles produced by the ETD author and inclusion of previously published articles in the ETD submission. A case study approach will provide the opportunity to consider and question issues such as negotiating with publishers and the ethics of authorship in multi-authored works.

    At 9:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Workshop: ETD Life Cycle Management

    Roberts Hall North 15

    Presented by Matthew Schultz, Program Manager, Educopia Institute

    This is a first-of-its-kind opportunity for ETD stakeholders and professionals (both new and advanced) to benefit from the latest research and development regarding the full lifecycle management of ETDs. The outcomes from this workshop will include comprehensive awareness-raising of the full range of activities required for the curation and preservation of ETDs, an introduction to various modular curation tools for ETD programs, as well as a rich opportunity to make rewarding connections with other ETD stakeholders and professionals through focused interactions and discussion. This research and workshop is supported by a 2011-2013 Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) grant.

    The workshop will include two Sessions:

    Session 1: Overview of ETD curation practices

    Topics covered will be based on the project’s Guidance Documents for the Lifecycle Management of ETDs, including:

    Access Levels & Embargoes
    Copyright Issues & Fair Use
    Complex ETD Formats
    Metadata for ETDs
    ETD Program Options
    ETD Program Implementations
    ETD Program Costs
    ETD Usage Metrics

    Session 2: Overview of ETD curation tools

    Attendees will also have the opportunity to learn about a number of modular curation tools that have been investigated and enhanced during this research project and discover ways that they can begin implementing and using them in their local ETD programs.

    Both of these Overview Sessions will include ample opportunity for attendees to pose follow-up questions of interest from their local ETD program perspectives, as well as respond to targeted questions for feedback.

    The University of North Texas Libraries, together with the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, the Educopia Institute/MetaArchive Cooperative, and the libraries of Virginia Tech, Rice University, Boston College, Indiana State University, Pennsylvania State University, and University of Arizona are pleased to be able to offer this USetdA 2013 pre-conference workshop.

    At 9:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Roberts Hall North, The Claremont Colleges

  • Workshop: ETDs for Beginners

    Location: Claremont McKenna College Kravis Center 102

    Presented by John H. Hagen, Scholarly Communications Consultant, Renaissance Scholarly Communications

    The successful implementation of electronic thesis and dissertation programs on campus can at first, seem to be a daunting task. This United States Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Association primer will prove extremely helpful in assisting you through this process. Armed with a team of experts, the “ETDs for Beginners” session will introduce you to concepts such as the myriad of free resources available through the USETDA AND NDLTD. Topics will include ETD implementation and political strategies, discussion of various models of homegrown ETD systems versus pre-packaged open source and commercial repository systems, ETD office automation strategies, the role of University libraries and graduate school in ETD program implementation and archiving, intellectual property issues as well as explore the usefulness of and approaches to consortia and networking to build ETD programs. This 3-hour workshop is open to rookies as well as veterans who would like a refresher on latest basic ETD concepts and resources. Get more out of attending the USETDA Conference by attending this free session.

    At 9:00am to 12:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Lunch

    Pick up your lunch in Scripps Malott Servery Dining Room (15A Ground level) and go upstairs to join us for the official welcome to USETDA 2013 and announcements. We will be eating in 15 A Hampton Room upstairs.

    At 12:00pm to 1:30pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Malott Servery Dining Room, The Claremont Colleges

  • Best Practice: Integrating Learning Management Systems to Facilitate ETD Workflow and Student Training

    Kravis Center 102

    Speakers: Larry Tague, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Graduate Health Sciences, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    David Armbruster, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Graduate Health Sciences, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    Shirley Hancock, Graduate School at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    LMS(s) can facilitate ETD workflows and student training/assistance. After proposing an LMS for managing ETD workflow (NDLTD ETD Symposium 2000), we started adapting our campus BlackBoard (Bb) to our ETD workflow needs (2005). Bb and Adobe Connect (AC) integration has become the center of everything ETD; document management, email, training, and student assistance across the entire ETD workflow. Before mandating ETDs in 2008 (2005 to 2007), Bb contributed to an exponential increase in the number of ETDs submitted (4, 9, 29). Our current ETD load (49/yr) has necessitated our adaption of individual Bb student groups. Each group has private email, file exchange, discussion functions, and includes the student and all members of our review team. The Assistant Dean monitors all group communications and student progress. Bb automatic email subject coding and controlled user subject naming helps reviewers track reviews. Students use their group discussion board from which ETD FAQs can be extracted. All ETD instruction, document templates, and graduate survey forms now reside in our ETD Bb training site. Student ETD training is monitored with the Bb user utilities. Face-to-face ETD workshops have been moved to Adobe Connect (AC) to better serve remote students. AC workshops are recorded and linked to our ETD Bb training site. AC is also used to assist students in real-time. The conclusion, after reviewing 270+ ETDs, is that single or multiple LMS(s) an be used to improve ETD workflow and student training.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Preliminary Findings from a Comprehensive Study of National ETD Programs and Practices

    Kravis Center Lower Court 62

    Revealed for the first time: data about ETD programs and practices at academic institutions nationwide.

    Presented by: Gail McMillan, Director, Center for Digital Research and Scholarship Services; Professor, University Libraries, Virginia Tech

    Shannon Stark, Strategic Projects Librarian, University of North Texas

    Dr. Martin Halbert, Dean of Libraries, Associate Professor, College of Information, University of North Texas

    While ETD programs are now longstanding and well accepted in academia, there has not been a comprehensive baseline or ongoing survey of ETD programs. The leadership of the NDLTD (the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations), Virginia Tech, and the University of North Texas partnered to conduct a broad study of programs and practices at academic institutions nationwide regarding ETDs. This study supplements prior surveys that have not been as comprehensive in studying ETD trends and issues. The authors created a survey that document current programs, practices, and problem areas reported by institutions, whether they are building a new ETD initiative or have established programs. This is the first year of what is intended to be a longitudinal study that will recurrently document the progress of ETD programs. It is our goal to repeat this survey every two years and to post the results widely in easily accessible open access repositories such as that of the NDTLD. This presentation will provide the first public look at comparative information for all ETD stakeholders in the form of more comprehensive information regarding ETD issues in the field. This survey is an outgrowth of a two-year grant funded by the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library Science.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Searching for Safe Harbor: Investigating LOCKSS as a Digital Preservation System for ETDs

    Roberts Hall North 15

    Speaker: Michele Wyngard, Digital Repository Coordinator, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo

    In fall of 2012, the Robert E. Kennedy Library (REKL) began investigating long term digital preservation methods as an alternative to microfiche for the preservation of their growing electronic theses and senior project collections.

    Michele Wyngard led the investigation, which resulted in a report discussing REKL digital preservation requirements for ETDs, as well as purchased and locally-created digital content, the digital preservation options currently available, and the pros, cons, and costs of each option, with a strong emphasis on LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe).

    The presenter will discuss the process used to determine REKL's need for digital preservation and the digital networks available, focusing on LOCKSS.

    The audience will gain an understanding of LOCKSS, its opportunities and limitations as they apply to the digital preservation of ETDs, and the knowledge of how to conduct a similar investigation at their own organization.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Roberts Hall North, The Claremont Colleges

  • Break

    At 2:30pm to 2:45pm, Wednesday 24th July

  • A Bigger Splash: Enhancing Discoverability of Theses via Digital Commons

    Kravis Center 102

    Speakers:

    Stacey Knight-Davis, Head of Technology, Booth Library, Eastern Illinois University

    Todd Bruns, Institutional Repository Librarian, Eastern Illinois University

    Eastern Illinois University, a medium-sized public comprehensive university, has offered digitized Masters theses since 2008. Deposited these are fully cataloged in the local online catalog, a shared state-wide catalog, and in WorldCat.

    In 2011 Booth Library launched the EIU institutional repository, The Keep. The Keep is built upon the bepress Digital Commons platform, and is being utilized as a research and scholarship showcase as well as an electronic University Archives for EIU. The digitized Masters theses collection presented a ready-made early document collection for the repository, giving The Keep a “jump start” in scholarly content. Early discussions about the collection included arguments about increased access via The Keep’s search engine optimization, arguments that were initially treated with some skepticism: Since the theses were already discoverable via local, consortial, and worldwide catalogs, having them in The Keep as well couldn’t increase access by that much, could it?

    Analysis of server logs and Digital Commons reports has in fact shown a dramatic increase in discoverability of the theses due to the institutional repository. Some theses have seen download increases by factors of ten. Also of interest, the topics of theses retrieved through the institutional repository are quite different than those retrieved through the catalog. This presentation will highlight this increase by looking at real numbers and statistics, giving some weight to the common assumption that institutional repository open access does dramatically improve discoverability.

    At 2:45pm to 3:45pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Beyond Traditional Theses and Dissertations: Nontraditional Approaches to Organizing an ETD

    Roberts Hall North 15

    Speakers:
    Nathalia Bauer, Coordinator of Information and Publications, College of Graduate Studies, University of Central Florida

    Debra Winter, Director, Graduate Financial Assistance and Publications, College of Graduate Studies
    University of Central Florida

    Nearly two decades after their emergence, ETDs are now widely embraced. However, despite their forward-sounding moniker, many ETDs still mimic their paper counterparts in function and appearance. This begs the question, what changes are leading to the next revolution in theses and dissertations?

    Pressures to increase student publication, improve retention rates, shorten time to degree completion, and the desire to produce more relevant theses and dissertations, are all influences shaping the future of ETDs. Some programs and faculty members are also guiding students to create theses and dissertations more relatable to non-academic careers.

    ETDs have been mandatory at the University of Central Florida (UCF) since 2004 and while publication has always been a desired academic goal, many graduate programs at UCF are now seeking ways to integrate publication as part of the thesis/dissertation process, and in some cases requiring it as a matter of policy. One UCF program is also requiring students to conduct dissertation research in conjunction with a “real world” scenario to be more applicable to their careers. Other examples of nontraditional ETDs include graphics-based and entirely digital formats.

    Academic institutions must begin to consider how to react to the changing needs nontraditional ETDs present. This presentation will provide an overview of the influences leading to an increase in nontraditional ETDs, the results of research conducted on nontraditional ETDs at UCF, and the possible implications and issues nontraditional ETDs pose. This session is intended for those who advise students on the preparation of ETDs for submission.

    At 2:45pm to 3:45pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Roberts Hall North, The Claremont Colleges

  • CSU Northridge ETD Workflow System

    Kravis Center Lower Court 62

    Speakers:
    Jeff Wiegley, Associate Professor, Computer Science, California State University, Northridge

    Steven Fitzgerald, Associate Professor, Computer Science, California State University, Northridge

    Kate Vigna, California State University, Northridge

    At 2:45pm to 3:45pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Break

    At 3:45pm to 4:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

  • Copyright Consultation for ETD Authors at the UCLA Library

    Kravis Center Lower Court 62

    Speakers: Angela Riggio, Head, Scholarly Communication and Licensing , UCLA Library, University of California, Los Angeles

    Martin Brennan, Copyright and Licensing Librarian, UCLA Library, University of California, Los Angeles

    Diane Gurman, Scholarly Communication and Licensing Librarian, UCLA Library, University of California, Los Angeles

    Angela Riggio, Martin Brennan and Diane Gurman are part of the Scholarly Communication (SCL) unit at the UCLA Library. Although administration of ETDs has moved from the UCLA Library to the Graduate Division as of April 2012, the library remains part of the process in several ways, and SCL librarians regularly offer consulting services to ETD authors regarding copyright concerns. In this presentation we will explore the most frequently asked questions of such authors, and the policy and procedural challenges resulting from this change to electronic submission. Discussion will follow to explore strategies for outreach and expert consulting, drawing on the experiences of librarians from other institutions in attendance.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Making Today's ETDs Available to Future Scholars

    Kravis Center 102

    Speaker: William J. Donovan, Digital Imaging & Curation Manager/ETD administrator, Boston College

    Unlike physical dissertations for which secure and environmentally hospitable archival storage may suffice, ETDs have special stewardship needs. As technology evolves, today's computing environment will someday become obsolete. A file format that is ubiquitous now, may one day become unreadable. Environmental disasters may damage the servers where ETDs are stored. Or, simple poor organization or metadata may effectively make an ETD hard to find or hard to be sure of its authenticity. These are predictable risks and can be mitigated by the curatorial practices discussed in this talk.
    Specifically, we will address topics such as: file formats; data wrangling; distributed digital preservation; migration; complex content objects; and versioning. In the not so distant future, our handling of these issues will determine whether a researcher can still find a particular ETD, whether they can still open the file(s), whether their viewing experience will still be faithful to the author’s original work, and will still encompass the totality of the scholarly work, i.e. the ETD and any supplementary material.
    It is hoped that this presentation will result in a deeper understanding and appreciation for the curation and digital preservation of ETDs and will motivate debate within the ETD community about what are the best practices and the tools needed to effectively curate ETDs.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Vireo 2.0: An Evolving Partnership in the Service of ETDs

    Roberts Hall North 15

    Speakers: Ryan Steans, Director of Operations, Texas Digital Library

    Laura Hammons, Director, Thesis Office, Office of Graduate Studies, Texas A&M University

    Kristi Park, Program Coordinator, Texas Digital Library

    Micah Cooper, Software Applications Developer, Texas A&M University

    Vireo Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission and Management software, developed by the Texas Digital Library as an open-source application, is a leading tool for graduate offices and academic libraries who accept, manage, and publish theses and dissertations online. During 2012, an evolving partnership among the TDL, the Vireo Users Group, and an emerging open-source community of developers produced two new versions of the Vireo software. These updates provide users with improved usability, greater customization options, and powerful new publishing features.

    In this presentation, several stakeholders in the Vireo project will discuss the capabilities and limitations of Vireo, share the progress made with the application over the past year, and briefly discuss the new features and improvements in Vireo 1.8 and 2.0. The panel will also discuss the Texas Digital Library’s relationship to Vireo as (1) a development partner on the project, (2) a Vireo hosting solution for its member institutions, and (3) an organizer, in collaboration with the Vireo Users Group, of the growing open-source community around Vireo. Finally, the panel will reflect on the evolution of Vireo and share a vision for future collaborative work on the software.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Roberts Hall North, The Claremont Colleges

  • Break

    At 5:00pm to 5:30pm, Wednesday 24th July

  • Opening Reception

    At 5:30pm to 7:00pm, Wednesday 24th July

    In Seal Court, The Claremont Colleges

Thursday 25th July 2013

  • Breakfast and Networking Session

    Pick up your breakfast in Scripps Malott Servery Dining Room (15A Ground level) and go upstairs to the Hampton Room to eat and network.

    At 8:00am to 9:15am, Thursday 25th July

    In Malott Servery Dining Room, The Claremont Colleges

  • Registration & Vendor Fair

    On-site registration and Vendor Fair
    Kravis Lover Court 63

    At 8:00am to 4:00pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Introduction to USETDA 2013 and Keynote - Pedagogical Impact of OA on Undergraduate Work

    Char Miller is director of the environmental analysis program at Pomona College and the W. M. Keck Professor of Environmental Analysis. He received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University and B.A. from Pitzer College. He is author of the award-winning Deep in the Heart of San Antonio: Land and Life in South Texas and Gifford Pinchot and the Making of Modern Environmentalism. Most recently, Miller published Public Lands, Public Debates: A Century of Controversy (2012) and is co-editor of Between Ruin and Restoration: An Environmental History of Israel (2013). His latest books include On the Edge: Water, Immigration, and Politics in the Southwest (2013) and Seeking the Greatest Good: The Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot (2013) and the co-authored Death Valley National Park: A History (2013). Miller is a regular contributor of essays, commentary, and reviews to professional journals, newspapers, and online media; his blog, Golden Green, explores environmental issues in California and the West for KCET.org.

    Miller joined the Environmental Analysis Program in 2007, after a 26-year stint at Trinity University in San Antonio. This five-college major is deeply interdisciplinary in its focus – which means that we have seniors writing theses in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Working closely with the Honnold Library staff has been essential to the wrangling of this array of disciplines and topics into some coherence, giving the students a much sharper understanding of the work that they have embarked on. In his keynote address, Miller explores how knowing that their work is going to be archived with public access provides a clarifying urgency to the students research and writing.

    At 9:15am to 10:45am, Thursday 25th July

    In Scripps Hampton Room, The Claremont Colleges

  • Poster Session

    Kravis Center, Lower Court 63

    Nash/Creating a User-centric ETD
    Experience: How Small Changes...

    Dromgoole /Analyzing Student Satisfaction
    with the Texas A&M...

    Ho, Price, Garrett/Sailing to a Better
    Place: Changing from a CD-based ETD...

    Kunda/Helping Graduate Students Make
    Sense of Fair Use in Their...

    Green/Land Ho!: Navigating the Rocky
    Shoals of ETD Preparation...

    Newell, Pena/Moving to New Repository
    Software

    Higgins, Collie, Mak, Nicholson/Opportunities
    Abound: ETDs as Harbingers of Institutional...

    At 10:45am to 11:15am, Thursday 25th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Break

    At 11:15am to 11:30am, Thursday 25th July

  • Emerging Trends in ETD Publishing Models: A Bird's Eye View

    Kravis Center 102

    Speaker: David Seitz, Consultant, bepress Consulting Services

    Big changes are afoot at graduate schools around the country. They are not just changing how they collect and provide access to theses and dissertations; they are also streamlining the submission and review workflows themselves. In this presentation, bepress’s ETD expert Dave Seitz will provide an overview of the ETD publishing landscape culled from the bepress Digital Commons community (280 institutions). The presentation will consider the “life cycle” of an ETD in its myriad forms, ranging from standard processes such as administrator-submitted batch uploads, to more progressive workflows, such as those utilizing student-submission and peer-review tools. Dave will share how these different approaches to the workflow, organization, and presentation of ETDs meet unique needs on campus. Paths to the inclusion of undergraduate work (capstones, honors projects, etc.) will also be discussed.
    The presentation is intended for both graduate office administrators and library professionals. Attendees will come away with not just an understanding of the top models that are emerging for capturing, reviewing, and presenting ETDs but also a set of considerations for optimizing their own ETD “life cycle”.

    At 11:30am to 12:30pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • One Tool to Rule Them All

    Kravis Center Lower Court 62

    Speaker: Gail Clement, Associate Professor & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries

    This paper presents preliminary findings of research investigating the completeness of various search and retrieval services that purport to provide bibliographic control of American theses and dissertations. The coverage of each respective search tool is compared against the known output of 20th century dissertations. Model searches run in each service demonstrate that no single tool currently provides comprehensive access to American theses and dissertations; rather, each provides a particular slice, offering both strengths and limitations. The conclusion of this research suggests that the need for an all-inclusive portal of American ETD's is greater than ever, as students exercise their options to submit their graduate works to an ever-expanding range of Web discovery services.

    At 11:30am to 12:00pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Riding the Waves: Handling the Ebb and Flow within an ETD Office without letting the Undertow Overtake You

    Roberts Hall North

    Speaker: Stacy Wallace, Coordinator, Graduate School Editorial Office, University of Florida

    Here at UF, we have participated in the ETD arena for nearly fifteen years. Along the way, we learned a great deal about the best ways to handle electronic documents and, unfortunately, we have also learned a great deal about the paths we no longer want to take. Our team is tasked with reviewing between 500 and 600 master’s theses and doctoral dissertations each term. During this process, we not only provide tips regarding formatting guidelines and direction but also provide a wide range of grammatical and editorial comments as well. With only two editors and the propensities of students to wait until deadlines to surrender documents for our review, we have found, we literally have only a few business days to review hundreds of documents.
    Adhering to these protocols within our constricted time frame has proven to be quite a difficult task. For this reason, we developed ways to quickly meet the needs of our students without sacrificing the quality of the documents of which we oversee. We not only have a template for all of our students to use, but most effectively, I developed a standard review template for our editors to use.
    During our time, I plan to show you the tools and the custom database systems we use and the methods that we have found can speed up the “reviewing/editing” processes for anyone who deals with electronic documents. I hope by sharing these with you, you will find ways to streamline your processes as well.

    At 11:30am to 12:30pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Roberts Hall North, The Claremont Colleges

  • OATD.org - A Harvested Discovery Service for Open Access Theses and Dissertations

    Kravis Center Lower Court 62

    Speaker: Thomas Dowling, Director of Technologies, Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest University

    The first decade (or so) of the ETD movement was necessarily focused on issues related to advocacy, policy, and production logistics. Our energies have gone towards educating colleagues and students on electronic publishing, IP rights, open access models, embargo options, and even how to generate good PDF files. We have implemented institutional repositories, submission systems, and long-term archiving strategies. We have taken a unique and valuable body of research that in the past was typically locked away, and made much of it accessible to the world.

    However, we have often done little to help researchers and scholars discover this content. At a time when libraries are putting unprecedented effort into improving the ability of their researchers to find and use their catalogs, journals, and other resources, not enough effort has gone into making the body of open access theses and dissertations easier to find and use.

    This presentation introduces Open Access Theses and Dissertations (OATD - http://oatd.org), a harvested discovery service for the open access content in the ETD literature. OATD harvests ETD collections from over 600 universities, with both OAI-PMH metadata harvesting and web crawling; makes site-specific rules to differentiate between open- and closed-access ETDs; and adds full-text search highlights and sample images from a growing number of ETDs. Goals for OATD include community involvement through a steering committee of ETD professionals, continual refinement of the user experience, and exhaustive, global coverage of open access theses and dissertations.

    At 12:00pm to 12:30pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Kravis Center, The Claremont Colleges

  • Lunch (Hosted by Aries)

    Pick up a lunch in the Scripps Malott Servery Dining Room (15A Ground level) and go upstairs to the Hampton Room for announcements. (15 A)

    At 12:30pm to 1:30pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Malott Servery Dining Room, The Claremont Colleges

  • Designing for Dual Submission of ETDs: Finding What Works

    Roberts Hall North 15

    Speaker: Philip Bolton, Jr., Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Coordinator, Graduate School, Florida International University

    At FIU, after deciding on a mandatory ETD Policy in July 2011, we considered moving from a payment/snail mail submission to altogether scrapping submission to ProQuest; however, our librarians made a case for keeping at least an option for ProQuest submission. After consideration of all the options, implementing the UMI ETD Administrator seemed the most logical because it relieves payment, paperwork, and snail mail.

    Unfortunately, the UMI ETD Administrator creates as many problems as it solves e.g., the dual submission. We felt the university should offer to make additional deposits outside of the institutional repository. Thus, we sought to find a way for the students to only submit once to our DigitalCommons Institutional Repository even though this path required staff time to submitting to the Administrator.

    Attendees, with institutions considering the ETD Administrator, should expect to anticipate and solve several issues associated with implementing the system in conjunction with an institutional repository. Attendees, who work with both the ETD Administrator and an Institutional Repository, should expect to gain new ideas for eliminating a dual submission for students, a quicker publication turn around, and/or decreased workflow time.

    At 1:30pm to 2:30pm, Thursday 25th July

    In Roberts Hall North, The Claremont Colleges